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Associate Professor Grant Webber

Associate Professor

School of Engineering (Chemical Engineering)

Career Summary

Biography

Although only a junior academic, I have made significant contributions to the fields of polymeric surface coatings and atomic force microscope (AFM) colloid probe force measurements, as evidenced by my solid record of publishing in international journals of high impact factor. I pioneered the use of AFM to image in-situ the development of films of polymer micelles adsorbed from aqueous solution onto solid substrates. I was the lead author of the first report to observe in-situ morphological changes in an adsorbed film of copolymer micelles in response to a change in aqueous solution pH. A subsequent article, again as lead author, was the first-ever report of reversible stimulus-responsive behaviour of micellar thin-films where the behaviour was in reaction to a simple aqueous solution based trigger. The novelty of this work in the context of coatings for controlled surface interactions cannot be underestimated.

My research methodolgy for understanding the properties of polymer adsorption is the combined application of a number of specialised scientific methods, such as atomic force microscopy, quartz crystal microbalance, electrophoretic mobility, contact angle and surface tension, and dynamic and static light scattering. This holistic approach has extracted significant new knowledge on the fundamental processes of polymer adsorption, and has enabled rigourous investigation of the link between microscopic changes in the morphology of polymer films and macroscopic properties such as wettability. I have recently started investigating ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are composed entirely of ions, and yet are liquid at room temperature, offering intriguing properties such as a wide solubility window and a high degree of molecular ordering when confined at a solid interface. Along with Dr Rob Atkin, for the Chemistry department at the University of Newcastle, we are investigating the properties of colloidal dispersions is ionic liquids, and probing important frictional and hydrodynamic forces. Previous work at the University of Melbourne focused on the use of atomic force microscopy to measure the interactions between deformable interfaces. Here I overcame the extreme technical difficulties of using an oil drop as a colloid probe, demonstrating my skills as an experimentalist.

I am skilled in atomic force microscopy, both imaging and colloidal probe force measurements, quartz crystal microbalance, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic mobility and rheological measurements. My current H-Index is 8, I have over 230 citations, and I have three articles with 40 or more citations (ISI Web of Science, February 2010). Below is a shortlist of some of my most important publications: 1. Webber, Grant B., Wanless, Erica J., Armes, Steven P., Baines, Fiona L., Biggs, Simon, Adsorption of Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymer Micelles at the Mica/Solution Interface. Langmuir, 17, 5551-5561 (2001) 2. Webber, Grant B., Wanless, Erica J., Bütün, Vural, Armes, Steven P., Biggs, Simon, Self-Organized Monolayer Films of Stimulus-Responsive Micelles. Nano Letters, 2, 1307-1313 (2002) 3. Webber, Grant B., Wanless, Erica J., Armes, Steven P., Tang, Yiqing, Li, Yuting, Biggs, Simon, Nano-anemones: Stimulus-responsive copolymer-micelle surfaces. Advanced Materials, 16, 1794-1798 (2004) 4. Webber, Grant B., Manica, Rogerio, Edwards, Scott A., Carnie, Steven L., Stevens, Geoffrey W., Grieser, Franz, Dagastine, Raymond R., Chan, Derek Y. C., Dynamic Forces between a Moving Particle and a Deformable Drop. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 112, 567-574 (2008) 5. Smith, Jacob A., Werzer, Oliver, Webber, Grant B., Warr, Gregory G. and Atkin, Rob, Surprising particle stability and rapid sedimentation rates in an ionic liquid. Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 1, 64-68 (2010)

Research Expertise
My research uses engineered surfaces and interfaces to control material properties. By combining the disciplines of chemical engineering and physical chemistry my research aims to solve real-world problems through the application of fundamental science. I have an extensive track record in the production and characterisation of stimulus-responsive polymer thin-film coatings. These coatings change their structure at a molecular level in response to external stimuli such as solution pH, temperature or salt concentration. The nanoscale switches in morphology impact macroscale behaviour, such as contact angle and wettability. Recent research has investigated the production of stimulus-responsive polymer coatings via a process known as surface initiated polymerisation. This process is water-based, has low energy requirements, and offers enhanced control of the three-dimensional structure of the coating. In this way we are able to better engineer a surface or interface to meet a specific end-use application, such as a temperature dependent rheology modifier. Another are of research is examining the effect of mixed stabilisers on the stability and rheology of emulsions, in particular highly-concentrated emulsions. Here, a combination of surfactant and particles are used to stabilise the oil-water interface. We are using dynamic and equilibrium surface tension measurements to characterise structure of the interface and relating this to emulsion stability during shear. I have recently started working in an exciting emerging field; ionic liquids. Ionic liquids have quite unusual physical and chemical properties, and are seen by many as ideal designer solvents for a range of industrial applications. My research is investigating the properties of dispersions of microscale solid particles in ionic liquids; a proposed application of ionic liquids is as solvents for catalytic reactions. We have discovered some unusual behaviour, such as high stability in conjunction with rapid settling, and are using a combination of friction, hydrodynamic and rheological measurements to further understand these remarkable class of materials. My research spans a wide range of length scales, from the nano- to micro- and up to the macroscale. As such I use an array of instruments and techniques in the course of my research: - atomic force microscopy for imaging, including soft-contact imaging in fluids, and force work - quartz crystal microbalance and optical reflectometry techniques to quantify adsorption of material at solid interfaces - dynamic and static light scattering for measuring particle sizes - electrophoretic techniques to measure particle surface charge (zeta potential) - surface and interfacial tension - contact angle - rheology

Teaching Expertise
I am course coordinator and sole lecturer for the 2nd year chemical engineering course Particle Processing. This course covers are range of topic related to particle and mineral processing, from small scale inter-particle interactions to industrial scale unit operations. I introduce students to the fundamental processes that control the interactions between two particles, such as the Deryagin-Landau and Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory that quantifies the effect of surface charge and van der Waals forces. We also examine the effect of surfactant and polymer adsorption at surfaces and interfaces, and discuss the stability and application of emulsions. The course also details unit operations important to particle processing, such as crushing and grinding, pneumatic conveying, storage hopper design, and fluidised beds. I am also strongly committed to ensuring that our chemical engineering students have adequate laboratory and practical skills, coupled with the ability to prepare coherent technical reports. To this I am course coordinator of the 2nd year laboratory course. This course uses bench-scale equipment to give the student practical demonstrations of theories they have learnt in lecture courses. These experiments include a forced air cooling tower, fluidised bed, and concentric tube heat exchanger. In this course the students are also expected to prepare technical reports, from which extensive feedback is provided so that the students are able to improve their skills in this often underrated component of engineering.

Administrative Expertise
Since starting at the University of Newcastle in late 2007 I have been a member of the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment (FEBE) Marketing Committee. I see this role as an important component of my job as a Chemical Engineering academic, as I believe there is great scope for increasing the profile of chemical engineering in the wider community. I am particularly dedicated to educating secondary students of the role of chemical engineers in todays society. To this I organise regular visits of my academic colleagues to high schools, as well as attending larger events, such as Careers Days, where I am able to reach a broader range of potential students. I have recently become a member of the FEBE Research Committee, which meets regularly to discuss issues that impact on research-active members of the Faculty.

Collaborations
My research uses engineered surfaces and interfaces to control material properties. By combining the disciplines of chemical engineering and physical chemistry my research aims to solve real-world problems through the application of fundamental science. I have an extensive track record in the production and characterisation of stimulus-responsive polymer thin-film coatings. These coatings change their structure at a molecular level in response to external stimuli such as solution pH, temperature or salt concentration. The nanoscale switches in morphology impact macroscale behaviour, such as contact angle and wettability. Recent research has investigated the production of stimulus-responsive polymer coatings via a process known as surface initiated polymerisation. This process is water-based, has low energy requirements, and offers enhanced control of the three-dimensional structure of the coating. In this way we are able to better engineer a surface or interface to meet a specific end-use application, such as a temperature dependent rheology modifier. Another are of research is examining the effect of mixed stabilisers on the stability and rheology of emulsions, in particular highly-concentrated emulsions. Here, a combination of surfactant and particles are used to stabilise the oil-water interface. We are using dynamic and equilibrium surface tension measurements to characterise structure of the interface and relating this to emulsion stability during shear. I have recently started working in an exciting emerging field; ionic liquids. Ionic liquids have quite unusual physical and chemical properties, and are seen by many as ideal designer solvents for a range of industrial applications. My research is investigating the properties of dispersions of microscale solid particles in ionic liquids; a proposed application of ionic liquids is as solvents for catalytic reactions. We have discovered some unusual behaviour, such as high stability in conjunction with rapid settling, and are using a combination of friction, hydrodynamic and rheological measurements to further understand these remarkable class of materials. My research spans a wide range of length scales, from the nano- to micro- and up to the macroscale. As such I use an array of instruments and techniques in the course of my research: - atomic force microscopy for imaging, including soft-contact imaging in fluids, and force work - quartz crystal microbalance and optical reflectometry techniques to quantify adsorption of material at solid interfaces - dynamic and static light scattering for measuring particle sizes - electrophoretic techniques to measure particle surface charge (zeta potential) - surface and interfacial tension - contact angle - rheology


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Mathematics, University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Newcastle
  • Bachelor of Science, University of Newcastle

Keywords

  • Atomic Force Microscope
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Chemistry
  • Colloid
  • Ellipsometry
  • Functional
  • Interface
  • Ionic Liquid
  • Laboratory
  • Particle
  • Particle Processing
  • Rheology
  • Surface
  • Tribology

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
030603 Colloid and Surface Chemistry 50
090406 Powder and Particle Technology 10
091499 Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy not elsewhere classified 40

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/11/2007 - 31/12/2011 Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Engineering
Australia
1/11/2005 - 1/11/2007 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow The University of Melbourne
Particulate Fluids Processing Centre
Australia
1/05/2004 - 1/10/2005 Post-Doctoral Research Fellow University of Leeds
Institute of Particle Science and Engineering
United Kingdom
1/05/2003 - 1/05/2004 Royal Academy of Engineering Anglo-Australian Post-Doctoral Research Fellow University of Leeds
Institute of Particle Science and Engineering
United Kingdom
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (50 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Jarrett E, Ireland PM, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, 'Particle-liquid structures formed by electric fields', Powder Technology, 297 1-7 (2016)

© 2016.We report the manufacture of complex structures of silica, coal or sphalerite particles around a water droplet, driven by an electrostatic field. A particle bed was deposi... [more]

© 2016.We report the manufacture of complex structures of silica, coal or sphalerite particles around a water droplet, driven by an electrostatic field. A particle bed was deposited on an electrically biased substrate and an earthed water drop brought close, such that the particles jumped to the drop. These structures' shape and internal composition were determined by a combination of the particles' wettability and electrical properties, and other attributes such as shape, size and density were also thought to play a role. Hydrophilic particles tend to be internalised by the drop, while hydrophobic ones tend to form a layer or shell on the surface. Thus, one example of these structures was a 'complex liquid marble', with a hydrophilic particle suspension core and a stabilising shell of hydrophobic particles.

DOI 10.1016/j.powtec.2016.04.021
Co-authors Peter Ireland, Erica Wanless
2016 Humphreys BA, Willott JD, Murdoch TJ, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, 'Specific ion modulated thermoresponse of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes.', Phys Chem Chem Phys, 18 6037-6046 (2016)
DOI 10.1039/c5cp07468a
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2016 Riazi H, Murphy T, Webber GB, Atkin R, Tehrani SSM, Taylor RA, 'Specific heat control of nanofluids: A critical review', International Journal of Thermal Sciences, 107 25-38 (2016)

© 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.Specific heat is a key thermal property in energy systems and is directly linked with heat storage and transfer. Concentrated sola... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.Specific heat is a key thermal property in energy systems and is directly linked with heat storage and transfer. Concentrated solar thermal (CST) power plants which incorporate thermal storage show promise to deliver affordable, renewable and reliable electricity without harmful emissions. As compared to wind and photovoltaic installations, which are intermittent, CST systems (with thermal storage) represent a technology which can be dispatched to provide a good match with energy demand - or at least to maximize revenue. At present, molten salts represent the dominant thermal storage medium. However, the low specific heat value of molten salts severely limits their applicability. Increasing the specific heat of molten salts could allow for a sizable reduction in storage volume, or for more energy to be stored in the same volume. Recently, researchers have shown that the specific heat of fluids can be altered through the addition of nanoparticles, although the fundamental governing mechanisms for the observed changes in this property have not yet been agreed upon. This paper provides a comprehensive review of recent, albeit sometimes contrary, nanofluid specific heat studies. Since a critical review of the ongoing work in this field has not yet been compiled, this paper provides insights into the range and magnitude of specific heat changes. This review also discusses possible underlying enhancement mechanisms, the impacts of colloidal stability, and uses these to rationalize the diverse range of results seen in the literature. Through reviewing the salient literature, it is hoped that this paper will help to guide future efforts in controlling the specific heat of nanosalts.

DOI 10.1016/j.ijthermalsci.2016.03.024
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2016 Chen Z, McLean B, Ludwig M, Stefanovic R, Warr GG, Webber GB, et al., 'Nanostructure of Deep Eutectic Solvents at Graphite Electrode Interfaces as a Function of Potential', Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 120 2225-2233 (2016)

© 2016 American Chemical Society.Atomic force microscopy (AFM), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and contact angle measurements have been used to investigate the liq... [more]

© 2016 American Chemical Society.Atomic force microscopy (AFM), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and contact angle measurements have been used to investigate the liquid-highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrode interface for three deep eutectic solvents (DESs) as a function of applied potential. The DESs examined are 1:2 mixtures of choline chloride and urea (ChCl:urea), choline chloride and ethylene glycol (ChCl:ethylene glycol), and choline chloride and glycerol (ChCl:glycerol). DFT calculations reveal that in all cases the molecular component is excluded from the graphite interface at all potentials, while chloride and choline are attracted into the Stern layer at positive and negative potentials, respectively. AFM force curves confirm these trends and also show that the first near surface liquid layer in contact with the Stern layer is rich in the molecular component. The extent of near surface layering increases with potential and the hydrogen bonding capacity of the molecular component. The variation in the macroscopic contact angle with potential is consistent with changes in the Stern layer composition.

DOI 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b10624
Co-authors Alister Page, Rob Atkin
2016 Sweeney J, Webber GB, Atkin R, 'Poly(ethylene oxide) Mushrooms Adsorbed at Silica-Ionic Liquid Interfaces Reduce Friction.', Langmuir, 32 1947-1954 (2016)
DOI 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b04503
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2016 Willott JD, Murdoch TJ, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, 'Nature of the Specific Anion Response of a Hydrophobic Weak Polyelectrolyte Brush Revealed by AFM Force Measurements', Macromolecules, 49 2327-2338 (2016)

© 2016 American Chemical Society.Complementary interaction force measurements between an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip or colloid probe and a weak polybasic brush have been s... [more]

© 2016 American Chemical Society.Complementary interaction force measurements between an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip or colloid probe and a weak polybasic brush have been shown to yield a number of fundamental characteristics of the brush and its response to the presence of specific anions in aqueous solution. Stretching of the poly(2-diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PDPA) chains physisorbed to the AFM tip and modeling the resultant force curves allowed the persistence and contour lengths, molecular weight, and thus grafting density of the brush to be determined. In kosmotropic acetate, high osmotic forces associated with the swollen PDPA brush repelled the colloid probe during both approach and retraction. For mildly chaotropic nitrate the behavior was similar, but at high ionic strength and during retraction, the interaction was strongly adhesive partly because of decreased brush solvation. For strongly chaotropic thiocyanate, the interaction was adhesive over the entire concentration range studied. Here, physical contact between the poorly solvated brush and the colloid resulted in an attractive force.

DOI 10.1021/acs.macromol.5b02656
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2016 Morse AJ, Giakoumatos EC, Tan SY, Webber GB, Armes SP, Ata S, Wanless EJ, 'Giant pH-responsive microgel colloidosomes: preparation, interaction dynamics and stability.', Soft Matter, 12 1477-1486 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c5sm02450a
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2015 Willott JD, Humphreys BA, Murdoch TJ, Edmondson S, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, 'Hydrophobic effects within the dynamic pH-response of polybasic tertiary amine methacrylate brushes.', Phys Chem Chem Phys, 17 3880-3890 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c4cp05292g
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2015 Sweeney J, Webber GB, Atkin R, 'Near surface properties of mixtures of propylammonium nitrate with n-alkanols 2. Nanotribology and fluid dynamics', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 17 26629-26637 (2015) [C1]

This journal is © the Owner Societies.Colloid probe friction force microscopy (FFM) has been used to study the lubricity of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) mixed with n-alkanols con... [more]

This journal is © the Owner Societies.Colloid probe friction force microscopy (FFM) has been used to study the lubricity of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) mixed with n-alkanols confined between sliding silica and mica surfaces. Mixtures of PAN with butanol, hexanol, octanol and dodecanol were investigated for various n-alkanol volume fractions to elucidate the effect of n-alkanol hydrocarbon chain length and concentration on shear forces. For all n-alkanols friction decreases with n-alkanol vol%. The trends in friction reduction with n-alkanol vol% do not correlate with changes in the bulk phase viscosity or the near surface nanostructure, and colloid probe atomic force microscope (AFM) fluid dynamic measurements showed that none of the mixtures shear thin. Thus, the reduction in friction is attributed to the n-alkanol disrupting solvophobic interactions between boundary layer propylammonium ions adsorbed to the mica and near surface liquid layers. The lowest friction is obtained for pure dodecanol, which is attributed to the dodecanol forming a robust boundary layer. Friction for the other pure n-alkanols is higher because the lateral attractions between adsorbed n-alkanols are too weak to facilitate the formation of a strong boundary layer, commensurate with the decreased hydrocarbon chain length.

DOI 10.1039/c5cp04787k
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2015 McLean B, Li H, Stefanovic R, Wood RJ, Webber GB, Ueno K, et al., 'Nanostructure of [Li (G4)] TFSI and [Li (G4)] NO 3 solvate ionic liquids at HOPG and Au (111) electrode interfaces as a function of potential', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 17 325-333 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/C4CP04522J
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Hua Li, Alister Page
2015 Willott JD, Murdoch TJ, Humphreys BA, Edmondson S, Wanless EJ, Webber GB, 'Anion-specific effects on the behavior of pH-sensitive polybasic brushes.', Langmuir, 31 3707-3717 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00116
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2015 Chen Z, Kobayashi Y, Webber GB, Ueno K, Watanabe M, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Adsorption of Polyether Block Copolymers at Silica-Water and Silica-Ethylammonium Nitrate Interfaces.', Langmuir, 31 7025-7031 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b01500
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2014 Willott JD, Murdoch TJ, Humphreys BA, Edmondson S, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, 'Critical salt effects in the swelling behavior of a weak polybasic brush.', Langmuir, 30 1827-1836 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la4047275
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 8
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2014 Sweeney J, Webber GB, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'Effect of ion structure on nanoscale friction in protic ionic liquids.', Phys Chem Chem Phys, 16 16651-16658 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c4cp02320j
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2014 Morse AJ, Tan SY, Giakoumatos EC, Webber GB, Armes SP, Ata S, Wanless EJ, 'Arrested coalescence behaviour of giant Pickering droplets and colloidosomes stabilised by poly(tert-butylaminoethyl methacrylate) latexes.', Soft Matter, 10 5669-5681 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c4sm00801d
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2014 Smith JA, Webber GB, Warr GG, Zimmer A, Atkin R, Werzer O, 'Shear dependent viscosity of poly(ethylene oxide) in two protic ionic liquids', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 430 56-60 (2014) [C1]

Steady shear viscosity measurements have been performed on 100. kDa poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) dissolved in the protic ionic liquids ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and propylammonium... [more]

Steady shear viscosity measurements have been performed on 100. kDa poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) dissolved in the protic ionic liquids ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and in water. The zero shear viscosity in all three solvents increases with polymer concentration, falling into three concentration regimes corresponding to dilute, semi-dilute and network solutions. Huggins plots reveal three distinct solvent conditions: good (water), good-theta (EAN) and theta (PAN). However, differences in the transition concentrations, power law behaviour of the viscosities, and relaxation times arising from shear thinning in the two ILs can be directly related to the effects of solvent nanostructure. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2014.05.006
Citations Scopus - 8
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2014 Liyanaarachchi KR, Webber GB, van Netten K, Moreno-Atanasio R, Galvin KP, 'Selective collection of fine particles by water drops', Advanced Powder Technology, (2014) [C1]

This study was concerned with the interaction between a gaseous dispersion of fine particles travelling in the horizontal direction and discrete drops of water falling vertically ... [more]

This study was concerned with the interaction between a gaseous dispersion of fine particles travelling in the horizontal direction and discrete drops of water falling vertically through the dispersion. A simple analytical model of the particle-drop collision was developed to describe the particle recovery by the drops as a function of the water flux, covering two extremes of relative velocity between the particles and drops. The Discrete Element Method was used to validate the analytical model. Further validation of the model and insights were obtained through experimental studies. The physical process of wetting was observed to be important in influencing the tendency of particles to become engulfed by the drops of water, or to either adhere to the drops or by-pass the drops altogether. Hydrophilic particles were readily engulfed while hydrophobic particles, at best, adhered to the surface of the drop, or failed to attach. Moreover, the recovery of the hydrophilic silica particles was significantly higher than the recovery of hydrophobic coal particles, with the selectivity ratio approximately 1.5. Spherical ballotini particles were the most sensitive, with a notable increase in recovery when cleaned, and evidence of increased recovery with increasing particle size. The recovery of irregular shaped silica flour particles, however, was largely independent of the particle size. A similar result was observed for irregular coal particles, though the recoveries were all lower than relatively more hydrophilic ballotini or silica flour. Crown Copyright © 2014.

DOI 10.1016/j.apt.2014.03.009
Co-authors Kevin Galvin, Roberto Moreno-Atanasio, Kim Vannetten
2014 Murphy T, Varela LM, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Nanostructure-thermal conductivity relationships in protic ionic liquids', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 118 12017-12024 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Chemical Society.The thermal conductivities of nine protic ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated between 293 and 340 K. Within this range, the thermal conduc... [more]

© 2014 American Chemical Society.The thermal conductivities of nine protic ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated between 293 and 340 K. Within this range, the thermal conductivities are between 0.18 and 0.30 W·m-1·K-1. These values are higher than those typically associated with oils and aprotic ILs, but lower than those of strongly hydrogen bonding solvents like water. Weak linear decreases in thermal conductivity with temperature are noted, with the exception of ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN) where the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The dependence of thermal conductivity on IL type is analyzed with use of the Bahe-Varela pseudolattice theory. This theory treats the bulk IL as an array of ordered domains with intervening domains of uncorrelated structure which enable and provide barriers to heat propagation (respectively) via allowed vibrational modes. For the protic ILs investigated, thermal conductivity depends strongly on the IL cation alkyl chain length. This is because the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the IL bulk nanostructure, which consists of charged (ordered domains) and uncharged regions (disordered domains). As the cation alkyl chain controls the dimensions of the disordered domains, it thus limits the thermal conductivity. To test the generality of this interpretation, the thermal conductivities of propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and PAN-octanol mixtures were examined; water selectively swells the PAN charged domain, while octanol swells the uncharged regions. Up to a certain concentration, adding water increases thermal conduction and octanol decreases it, as expected. However, at high solute concentrations the IL nanostructure is broken. When additional solvent is added above this concentration the rate of change in thermal conductivity is greatly reduced. This is because, in the absence of nanostructure, the added solvent only serves to dilute the salt solution.

DOI 10.1021/jp507408r
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2014 Addicoat MA, Stefanovic R, Webber GB, Atkin R, Page AJ, 'Assessment of the density functional tight binding method for protic ionic liquids', Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 10 4633-4643 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 American Chemical Society.Density functional tight binding (DFTB), which is ~100-1000 times faster than full density functional theory (DFT), has been used to simulate the... [more]

© 2014 American Chemical Society.Density functional tight binding (DFTB), which is ~100-1000 times faster than full density functional theory (DFT), has been used to simulate the structure and properties of protic ionic liquid (IL) ions, clusters of ions and the bulk liquid. Proton affinities for a wide range of IL cations and anions determined using DFTB generally reproduce G3B3 values to within 5-10 kcal/mol. The structures and thermodynamic stabilities of n-alkyl ammonium nitrate clusters (up to 450 quantum chemical atoms) predicted with DFTB are in excellent agreement with those determined using DFT. The IL bulk structure simulated using DFTB with periodic boundary conditions is in excellent agreement with published neutron diffraction data.

DOI 10.1021/ct500394t
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Alister Page
2014 Smith J, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Silica particle stability and settling in protic ionic liquids', Langmuir, 30 1506-1513 (2014) [C1]

Silica particle suspensions of 10 wt % have been investigated in the protic ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN), propylammonium nitrate... [more]

Silica particle suspensions of 10 wt % have been investigated in the protic ionic liquids (ILs) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), ethanolammonium nitrate (EtAN), propylammonium nitrate (PAN), and dimethylethylammonium formate (DMEAF). Static and dynamic light scattering reveal that single particles coexist in dynamic equilibrium with flocculated networks at room temperature. These types of systems are classified as weakly flocculated and are quite rare. As weakly flocculated systems generally exist only within a narrow range of conditions, the effect of temperature was probed. When temperature is increased, the thermal motion of suspended particles increases, favoring dispersion, but in ILs suspensions, heating reduces the stabilizing effect of the interfacial structure of the IL. When subjected to a small increase in temperature, particle suspensions in ILs become unstable, indicated by the absence of a peak corresponding to single particles in the light scattering data. For EAN and DMEAF, further increasing temperatures above 40 C returns the systems to a weakly flocculated state in which thermal energy is sufficient to break particles away from aggregates. Weakly flocculated suspensions in EAN and EtAN settle more rapidly than predicted by the Stokes equation, as the particles spend a significant portion of time in large, rapidly settling flocs. Surprisingly, suspensions in PAN and DMEAF settle slower than predicted. Oscillatory rheology indicates that these suspensions are viscoelastic, due to a persistent, long-range structure in the suspension that slows settling. In aggregated systems, settling is very rapid. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

DOI 10.1021/la403978b
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2013 Liyanaarachchi KR, Ireland PM, Webber GB, Galvin KP, 'Electrostatic formation of liquid marbles and agglomerates', APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, 103 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1063/1.4817586
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Kevin Galvin, Peter Ireland
2013 Cheesman BT, Neilson AJG, Willott JD, Webber GB, Edmondson S, Wanless EJ, 'Effect of Colloidal Substrate Curvature on pH-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Brush Growth', LANGMUIR, 29 6131-6140 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la4004092
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2013 Elbourne A, Sweeney J, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Warr GG, Rutland MW, Atkin R, 'Adsorbed and near-surface structure of ionic liquids determines nanoscale friction', CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS, 49 6797-6799 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c3cc42844c
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Erica Wanless
2013 Cheesman BT, Smith EG, Murdoch TJ, Guibert C, Webber GB, Edmondson S, Wanless EJ, 'Polyelectrolyte brush pH-response at the silica-aqueous solution interface: a kinetic and equilibrium investigation', PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY CHEMICAL PHYSICS, 15 14502-14510 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/c3cp52281d
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2013 Smith JA, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Rheology of Protic Ionic Liquids and Their Mixtures', JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY B, 117 13930-13935 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jp407715e
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 15
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2012 Wakeham D, Eschebach DS, Webber GB, Atkin R, Warr GG, 'Surface composition of mixtures of ethylammonium nitrate, ethanolammonium nitrate, and water', Australian Journal of Chemistry, 65 1554-1556 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2012 Carstens T, Hayes RL, Abedin SZE, Corr BJ, Webber GB, Borisenko N, et al., 'In situ STM, AFM and DTS study of the interface 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate/Au(1 1 1)', Electrochimica Acta, 82 48-59 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.electacta.2012.01.111
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 18
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2012 Sweeney JT, Hausen F, Hayes RL, Webber GB, Endres F, Rutland MW, et al., 'Control of nanoscale friction on gold in an ionic liquid by a potential-dependent ionic lubricant layer', Physical Review Letters, 109 155502 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.155502
Citations Scopus - 68Web of Science - 51
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2012 Thompson KL, Giakoumatos EC, Ata S, Webber GB, Armes SP, Wanless EJ, 'Direct observation of giant pickering emulsion and colloidosome droplet interaction and stability', Langmuir, 28 16501-16511 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 11
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2012 MacPherson SA, Webber GB, Moreno-Atanasio R, 'Aggregation of nanoparticles in high ionic strength suspensions: Effect of Hamaker constant and particle concentration', Advanced Powder Technology, 23 478-484 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Roberto Moreno-Atanasio
2012 Hayes RL, Borisenko N, Corr BJ, Webber GB, Endres F, Atkin R, 'Effect of dissolved LiCl on the ionic liquid-Au(111) electrical double layer structure', Chemical Communications, 48 10246-10248 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 25
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2012 Cheesman BT, Willott JD, Webber GB, Edmondson S, Wanless EJ, 'pH-responsive brush-modified silica hybrids synthesized by surface-initiated ARGET ATRP', ACS Macro Letters, 1 1161-1165 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/mz3003566
Citations Scopus - 20Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2010 Smith JA, Werzer O, Webber GB, Warr GG, Atkin R, 'Surprising particle stability and rapid sedimentation rates in an ionic liquid', Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, 1 64-68 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jz9000642
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 43
Co-authors Rob Atkin
2010 Dagastine RR, Webber GB, Manica R, Stevens GW, Grieser F, Chan DYC, 'Viscosity Effects on Hydrodynamic Drainage Force Measurements Involving Deformable Bodies', LANGMUIR, 26 11921-11927 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la1012473
Citations Scopus - 19Web of Science - 16
2008 Webber GB, Edwards SA, Stevens GW, Grieser F, Dagastine RR, Chan DYC, 'Measurements of dynamic forces between drops with the AFM: novel considerations in comparisons between experiments and theory.', Soft Matter, 4 1270-1278 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b717303b
Citations Scopus - 34Web of Science - 29
2008 Webber GB, Manica R, Edwards SA, Carnie SL, Stevens GW, Grieser F, et al., 'Dynamic Forces between a Moving Particle and a Deformable Drop.', The Journal of Physical Chemistry Part C: Nanomaterials and Interfaces, 112 567-574 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jp076215d
Citations Scopus - 17Web of Science - 16
2008 Sakai K, Webber GB, Vo C-D, Wanless EJ, Vamvakaki M, Butun V, et al., 'Characterization of layer-by-layer self-assembled multilayer films of diblock copolymer micelles', Langmuir, 24 116-123 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la7021006
Citations Scopus - 24Web of Science - 22
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2008 Webber GB, Stevens GW, Grieser F, Dagastine RR, Chan DYC, 'Variations in properties of atomic force microscope cantilevers fashioned from the same wafer.', Nanotechnology, 19 1-6 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1088/0957-4484/19/10/105709
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2007 Biggs S, Labarre M, Hodges C, Walker LM, Webber GB, 'Polymerized rodlike micelle adsorption at the solid-liquid interface', LANGMUIR, 23 8094-8102 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/1a700708g
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
2007 Biggs S, Sakai K, Addison T, Schmid A, Armes SP, Vamvakaki M, et al., 'Layer-by-layer formation of smart particle coatings using oppositely charged block copolymer micelles', ADVANCED MATERIALS, 19 247-+ (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/adma.200601553
Citations Web of Science - 55
2007 Smith EG, Webber GB, Sakai K, Biggs S, Armes SP, Wanless EJ, 'Direct visualization of a self-organized multilayer film of low T g diblock copolymer micelles', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 111 5536-5541 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jp072231z
Citations Scopus - 16Web of Science - 16
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2007 Sakai K, Smith EG, Webber GB, Baker MJ, Wanless EJ, Butun V, et al., 'pH-responsive behavior of selectively quaternized diblock copolymers adsorbed at the silica/aqueous solution interface', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 314 381-388 (2007) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2007.06.018
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2006 Sakai K, Smith EG, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Butun V, Armes SP, Biggs S, 'Effects of copolymer concentration and chain length on the pH-responsive behavior of diblock copolymer micellar films', Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 303 372-379 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jcis.2006.07.077
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 10
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2006 Sakai K, Smith EG, Webber GB, Baker MJ, Wanless EJ, Butun V, et al., 'Characterizing the pH-responsive behavior of thin films of diblock copolymer micelles at the silica/aqueous solution interface', Langmuir, 22 8435-8442 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la061708f
Citations Scopus - 35Web of Science - 33
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2006 Sakai K, Smith EG, Webber GB, Schatz C, Wanless EJ, Butun V, et al., 'pH-responsive diblock copolymer micelles at the silica/aqueous solution interface: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies', Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 110 14744-14753 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/jp062830q
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2006 Sakai K, Smith EG, Webber GB, Schatz C, Wanless EJ, Butun V, et al., 'Comparison of the adsorption of cationic diblock copolymer micelles from aqueous solution onto mica and silica', Langmuir, 22 5328-5333 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la060662n
Citations Scopus - 27Web of Science - 24
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2005 Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Armes SP, Biggs S, 'Tunable diblock copolymer micelles-adapting behaviour via subtle chemical modifications', FARADAY DISCUSSIONS, 128 193-209 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1039/b403180f
Citations Scopus - 30Web of Science - 26
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2004 Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Armes SP, Tang Y, Li Y, Biggs S, 'Nano-Anemones: Stimulus-Responsive Copolymer-Micelle Surfaces', Advanced Materials, 16 1794-1798 (2004) [C1]
DOI 10.1002/adma.200400086
Citations Scopus - 74Web of Science - 69
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2002 Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Butun V, Armes S, Biggs SR, 'Self-organized monolayer films of stimulus-responsive micelles', Nano Letters, 2 1307-1313 (2002) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 57Web of Science - 57
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2001 Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Armes SP, Baines FL, Biggs S, 'Adsorption of amphiphilic diblock copolymer micelles at the mica/solution interface', Langmuir, 17 5551-5561 (2001) [C1]
DOI 10.1021/la010335+
Citations Scopus - 54Web of Science - 55
Co-authors Erica Wanless
Show 47 more journal articles

Conference (15 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Murdoch TJ, Johnson E, Edmondson S, Wanless EJ, Webber GB, 'Synthesis, optimisation and characterisation of thermoresponsive polymer brushes', Proceedings of APCCHE 2015 Congress Incorporating Chemeca 2015 (2015) [E1]
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2015 Ireland PM, Webber GB, Jarrett ED, Galvin KP, 'Interaction of a particle bed with a droplet under an applied electric field', Journal of Physics: Conference Series (2015) [E1]

Transport of dry solid particles to a liquid is relevant to a number of emerging applications, including 'liquid marbles'. We report experiments where the transport of dry particl... [more]

Transport of dry solid particles to a liquid is relevant to a number of emerging applications, including 'liquid marbles'. We report experiments where the transport of dry particles to a pendent water droplet is driven by an external electric field. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials (silica, PMMA) were studied. For silica particles (hydrophilic, poorly conductive), a critical applied voltage initiated transfer, in the form of a rapid 'avalanche' of a large number of particles. The particle-loaded drop then detached, producing a metastable spherical agglomerate. Pure PMMA particles did not display this 'avalanche' behaviour, and when added to silica particles, appeared to cause aggregation and change the nature of the transfer mechanism. This paper is largely devoted to the avalanche process, in which deformation of the drop and radial compaction of the particle bed due to the electric field are thought to have played a central role. Since no direct contact is required between the bed and the drop, we hope to produce liquid marble-type aggregates with layered structures incorporating hydrophilic particles, which has not previously been possible.

DOI 10.1088/1742-6596/646/1/012027
Co-authors Kevin Galvin, Peter Ireland
2014 Jarrett ED, Galvin KP, Ireland PM, Webber GB, 'Collection of Fine Particles by a Water Droplet under an Applied Electric Field.', Chemeca 2014: Processing excellence; Powering our future (2014)
Co-authors Peter Ireland, Kevin Galvin
2014 Wanless EJ, Smith J, Bournival G, Tan SY, Webber GB, Ata S, 'High speed video observations of alumina-coated air bubble coalescence', Chemeca 2014: Processing excellence; Powering our future (2014) [E1]
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2014 Morse AJ, Tan S-Y, Giakoumatos EC, Webber GB, Armes SP, Ata S, Wanless EJ, 'Coalescence behavior of giant Pickering droplets and colloidosomes stabilized by poly(tert-butylaminoethyl methacrylate) latexes', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2014 Atkin R, Li H, Sweeney J, Elbourne A, Webber G, Rutland M, Warr GG, 'Effect of surface nanostructure and ion structure on the nanotribology of the graphite: Ionic liquid interface', ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Rob Atkin, Hua Li
2013 Asencio RÁ, Cranston ED, Wakeham D, Niga P, Werzer O, Sweeney J, et al., 'Nanotribology: Tribotronics, ionic liquids and control of surface interactions', 5th World Tribology Congress, WTC 2013 (2013)

The interfacial ordering of Ionic liquids leads to interesting nanotribological properties as revealed by colloid probe studies. The first of these is the clear correlation betwee... [more]

The interfacial ordering of Ionic liquids leads to interesting nanotribological properties as revealed by colloid probe studies. The first of these is the clear correlation between the number of ion pairs trapped in the tribological contact and the friction coefficient displayed. The second is the fact that the surface electrical potential can be used to control the composition of the boundary layer and thus tune the friction. Thirdly, the interfacial ordering appears to significantly affect the fluid dynamics over large distances.

Co-authors Rob Atkin
2012 Liyanaarachchi KR, Webber GB, Galvin KP, 'Selective collection of fine particles by water drops', 2012 AIChE Annual Meeting (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Kevin Galvin, Kim Vannetten
2011 Webber GB, MacPherson SA, Moreno-Atanasio R, 'The kinetics of colloidal aggregation - Effect of bimodal Hamaker constant distribution and Brownian forces', Abstract Booklet. UK Colloids 2011: An international Colloid & Surface Science Symposium (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Roberto Moreno-Atanasio
2011 MacPherson SA, Webber GB, Moreno-Atanasio R, 'The kinetics of colloidal aggregation: Influence of the van der Waals forces', Chemeca 2011: Engineering a Better World (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Roberto Moreno-Atanasio
2011 Neville FC, Murphy TI, Webber GB, Wanless EJ, Jameson GJ, 'Fabrication and characterisation of biomimetic silicate nanoparticles', Chemeca 2011: Engineering a Better World (2011) [E1]
Co-authors Graeme Jameson, Erica Wanless, Frances Neville
2010 Galvin KP, Webber GB, Mason M, Liyanaarachchi KR, 'Inverse flotation - A new method of fine particle beneficiation', Chemeca 2010: Proceedings of the 40th Australasian Chemical Engineering Conference (2010) [E1]
Co-authors Kevin Galvin
2006 Harbottle D, Webber GB, Fairweather M, Rhodes D, Biggs S, 'Applying the quartz crystal microbalance technique to determine the stability of colloidal suspensions.', Conference Proceedings of the AIChE Spring National Meeting (2006) [E1]
2005 Webber GB, Sakai K, Wanless EJ, Armes SP, Vamvakaki M, Butun V, Biggs S, 'Preparation, Characterisation and utilisation of Diblock Copolymer Michelle Thin-Films and Multilayers', Proceedings of 7th World Congress of Chemical Engineering (2005) [E1]
Co-authors Erica Wanless
2005 Sakai K, Webber GB, Butun V, Vamvakaki M, Armes SP, Biggs S, 'Self-assembled diblock copolymers as nanomaterial building blocks', Proceedings of the 7th World Congress of Chemical Engineering (2005) [E1]
Show 12 more conferences
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 19
Total funding $1,448,112

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20171 grants / $7,500

Confinement effects on the stimulus response of polymer brushes$7,500

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding body AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project Team Mr Ben Humphreys, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Postgraduate Research Award (PGRA)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2017
Funding Finish 2019
GNo G1600659
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20151 grants / $13,750

Structure-stimulus relations in responsive polymer brushes$13,750

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding body AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project Team Mr Timothy Murdoch, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Erica Wanless
Scheme Postgraduate Research Award (PGRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500636
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20144 grants / $119,001

Surface and Colloid Characterisation Facility$60,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Vincent Craig, Dr Shannon Notley, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Peter Kingshott, Professor Erica Wanless, Professor Sally McArthur, Professor Rob Atkin, Associate Professor Paul Stoddart, Associate Professor Andrew Clayton
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1300566
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Surface and Colloid Characterisation Facility$41,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Vincent Craig, Dr Shannon Notley, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Peter Kingshott, Professor Erica Wanless, Professor Sally McArthur, Professor Rob Atkin, Associate Professor Paul Stoddart, Associate Professor Andrew Clayton
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400581
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Controlled Interactions in Multiphase Fluids$10,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Erica Wanless
Scheme Near Miss Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301393
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Critical salt effects in polymer brushes$8,001

Funding body: AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)

Funding body AINSE (Australian Institute of Nuclear Science & Engineering)
Project Team Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme AINSE Award
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1401383
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20132 grants / $335,000

Functional mesostructured materials in ionic liquids$180,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Gregory Warr, Professor Rob Atkin, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1300041
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Nano-Optical Microscopy, Characterization and Fabrication Facility$155,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Andrew Fleming, Doctor John Holdsworth, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Erich Kisi, Professor Dirk Van Helden
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1200167
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $31,200

A Raman facility for advanced research supporting Australia's natural gas, oil, coal and minerals industries$30,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Eric May, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Michael Stockenhuber, Associate Professor Marian Radny, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1100662
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

International Association of Colloid and Interface Scientists (IACIS) Conference, Sendai, Japan, 13 - 18 May 2012$1,200

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment
Project Team Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200614
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20116 grants / $640,800

Next-generation polymer films for control of material interactions$300,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Dr Steve Edmondson
Scheme Discovery Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1000042
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Interfacial Mapping Facility$180,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Professor Paul Dastoor, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor Deborah Kane, Dr James Downes, Dr Gregory Wilson, Doctor Chris Fell
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000635
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

Interfacial Mapping Facility$90,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Paul Dastoor, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Equipment Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000466
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Interfacial Mapping Facility$40,000

Funding body: CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

Funding body CSIRO - Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
Project Team Professor Paul Dastoor, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor Deborah Kane, Dr James Downes, Dr Gregory Wilson, Doctor Chris Fell
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF) Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100411
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Interfacial Mapping Facility$30,000

Funding body: Macquarie University

Funding body Macquarie University
Project Team Professor Paul Dastoor, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Professor Erica Wanless, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Ewa Goldys, Professor Deborah Kane, Dr James Downes, Dr Gregory Wilson, Doctor Chris Fell
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF) Partner Funding
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100872
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

UK Colloids, Canary Wharf, London UK, 4 - 6 July 2011$800

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment
Project Team Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1100777
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20103 grants / $300,861

A Step Change in Fine Particle Beneficiation - Inverse Flotation$136,400

Funding body: Australian Coal Research Limited

Funding body Australian Coal Research Limited
Project Team Laureate Professor Kevin Galvin, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor John Ralston, Dr Catherine Whitby
Scheme Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2011
GNo G1000115
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

Soft matter and responsive materials characterisation facility$135,535

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Dr Raymond Dagastine, Laureate Professor Graeme Jameson, Associate Professor Grant Webber, Professor Rob Atkin, Professor Erica Wanless
Scheme Linkage Infrastructure Equipment & Facilities (LIEF)
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G1000397
Type Of Funding Scheme excluded from IGS
Category EXCL
UON Y

A new combined Atomic Force Microscopy and computer-simulation approach for improved modelling of particulate solids behaviour $28,926

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Engineering & Built Environment
Project Team Doctor Roberto Moreno-Atanasio, Associate Professor Grant Webber
Scheme Pilot Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo G0900065
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed4
Current8

Total current UON EFTSL

Masters0.6
PhD3

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Hofmeiester Effects in Ionic Liquid Bulk and Interfacial Structure
PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Exploring the Electrostatic Formation of Liquid Marbles
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Understanding Structural Changes in Responsive Polymer Brushes
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Structure and Property Relationships in Ionic Liquids and Deep Eutectic Solvents
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Polymeric Materials as Additives to Low Melting Point Salt Lubricants
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2015 PhD Synthesis, Characterisation and Optimisation of Thermoresponsive Polymer Brushes
PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 Masters Understanding Structural Changes in Responsive Polymer Brushes
, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Next-Generation Polymer Films for Control of Material Interactions
PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2016 PhD Self-Assembly and Structure in Ionic Liquids and their Mixtures
PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2016 PhD Nanoscale Friction Mechanisms in Ionic Liquid Systems
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
2015 PhD Selective Collection of Fine Particles by Water Drops
PhD (Chemical Engineering), Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
2014 PhD Molecular Structure, Flow Properties and Particle Stability in Protic Ionic Liquids
PhD (Chemistry), Faculty of Science and Information Technology, The University of Newcastle
Co-Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 53
United Kingdom 26
Turkey 7
Germany 5
Sweden 5
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Associate Professor Grant Webber

Position

Associate Professor
School of Engineering
Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment

Focus area

Chemical Engineering

Contact Details

Email grant.webber@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4033 9067
Fax (02) 4033 9095

Office

Room A238
Building NIER - A Block
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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