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Dr Don Van Ravenzwaaij

DECRA Fellow

School of Psychology

Career Summary

Biography

My name is Don van Ravenzwaaij and I am a lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Cognitive  and Computational Psychology at the University of Newcastle. I obtained my PhD in Quantitative Psychology at the University of Amsterdam in 2012. After graduating, I have worked as a post-doc at the University of New South Wales on developing computational models of judgment and decision making processes until July 2013. For more information on my research and my teaching, please visit my website at http://www.donvanravenzwaaij.com/Home.html

Research Expertise
The first pillar of my research has been the advancement and application of response time models, such as the drift diffusion model, to speeded decision making. In the past, I have published both theoretical and applied work on response time models in the fields of mathematical psychology, statistics, neurophysiology, intelligence research, social psychology, psychopharmacology, and clinical psychology. The second pillar of my research has been the application of Bayesian decision-making models to data from non-speeded decision environments. My interest is in developing computational models aimed at examining how decision makers gather information in new and uncertain decision environments. I have also worked on developing computational models for tasks that assess risk taking behavior.

Teaching Expertise
I am currently the course co-ordinator of Psyc3000, the third year statistics and methodology course of psychology. I have also taught classes on cognitive science, Bayesian statistics, R and Matlab, and the typesetting program LaTeX.

Administrative Expertise
CoursI am currently the course co-ordinator of Psyc3000, the third year statistics and methodology course of psychology. I was also co-organizer of the annual Mathematical Psychology Conference, which was hosted in Amsterdam in August 2009.

Collaborations
Response time modeling with Prof. Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, A/Prof. Scott Brown, and Prof. Francis Tuerlinckx.

Qualifications

  • PhD (Behavioural Science), University of Amsterdam - Netherlands
  • Master of Science (Psychology), University of Amsterdam - Netherlands

Keywords

  • Bayesian modeling
  • Cognitive Science
  • Judgment and decision making
  • Response time modeling
  • Statistics

Languages

  • German (Fluent)
  • Dutch (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
170202 Decision Making 40
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
DECRA Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 - 31/12/2017 Membership - Australian Council Grant Australian Council
Australia
1/01/2014 -  Membership - Psychonomic Society Psychonomic Society
Australia
1/04/2012 - 1/07/2013 Post-doc The University of New South Wales
School of Psychology
Australia
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2012 Editorial Board - ANZAScA Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA)
Australia
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2013 Membership - ANZAScA Australian and New Zealand Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA)
Australia
1/01/2008 - 1/12/2011 PhD Student University of Amsterdam
School of Psychology
Netherlands
1/01/2008 -  Membership - Society of Mathematical Psychology Society of Mathematical Psychology
Australia

Awards

Research Award

Year Award
2014 DECRA
Australia Research Council
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (3 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Wetzels R, van Ravenzwaaij D, Wagenmakers EJ, 'Bayesian analysis', The Encyclopedia of clinical psychology, Wiley¿Blackwell, US . (2015)
2013 van Ravenzwaaij D, Lee MD, Wagenmakers EJ, 'The BART model of risk taking', Bayesian cognitive modelling: A practical course, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 207-212 (2013)
Schulze C, van Ravenzwaaij D, Newell BR, 'Match me if you can: How smart choices are fuelled by competition', Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, Cognitive Science Society [E3]

Journal article (27 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Schulze C, van Ravenzwaaij D, Newell BR, 'Of matchers and maximizers: How competition shapes choice under risk and uncertainty', Cognitive Psychology, 78 78-98 (2015)

In a world of limited resources, scarcity and rivalry are central challenges for decision makers-animals foraging for food, corporations seeking maximal profits, and athletes trai... [more]

In a world of limited resources, scarcity and rivalry are central challenges for decision makers-animals foraging for food, corporations seeking maximal profits, and athletes training to win, all strive against others competing for the same goals. In this article, we establish the role of competitive pressures for the facilitation of optimal decision making in simple sequential binary choice tasks. In two experiments, competition was introduced with a computerized opponent whose choice behavior reinforced one of two strategies: If the opponent probabilistically imitated participant choices, probability matching was optimal; if the opponent was indifferent, probability maximizing was optimal. We observed accurate asymptotic strategy use in both conditions irrespective of the provision of outcome probabilities, suggesting that participants were sensitive to the differences in opponent behavior. An analysis of reinforcement learning models established that computational conceptualizations of opponent behavior are critical to account for the observed divergence in strategy adoption. Our results provide a novel appraisal of probability matching and show how this individually 'irrational' choice phenomenon can be socially adaptive under competition.

DOI 10.1016/j.cogpsych.2015.03.002
2015 Schulze C, van Ravenzwaaij D, Newell BR, 'Of matchers and maximizers: How competition shapes choice under risk and uncertainty. Manuscript submitted for publication', in press, . (2015)
2015 van Ravenzwaaij D, Mulder MJ, Tuerlinckx F, Wagenmakers E-J, 'Paradoxes of optimal decision making: a response to Moran (2014)', PSYCHONOMIC BULLETIN & REVIEW, 22 307-308 (2015)
DOI 10.3758/s13423-014-0679-1
2015 Van Ravenzwaaij D, Cassey P, Brown SD, 'A Simple Introduction to Markov Chain Monte-Carlo', Manuscript submitted for publication, - (2015)
2015 Donkin C, Van Ravenzwaaij D, Hawkins GE, 'Developing a Program for Teaching Bayesian Statistics to Psychologists', Manuscript submitted for publication, - (2015)
2015 Campbell L, Hanlon M-C, Cherrie G, Harvey C, Stain HJ, Cohen M, et al., 'Severity of Illness and Adaptive Functioning Predict Quality of Care of Children Among Parents with Psychotic Disorders: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis.', Manuscript submitted for publication, - (2015)
2015 Schulze C, Van Ravenzwaaij D, Newell BR, 'Hold it! The Influence of Lingering Rewards on Choice Diversification and Persistence.', Manuscript submitted for publication., --- (2015)
2015 Schulze C, van Ravenzwaaij D, Newell BR, 'Of matchers and maximizers: How competition shapes choice under risk and uncertainty', Cognitive Psychology, 78 78-98 (2015)

In a world of limited resources, scarcity and rivalry are central challenges for decision makers-animals foraging for food, corporations seeking maximal profits, and athletes trai... [more]

In a world of limited resources, scarcity and rivalry are central challenges for decision makers-animals foraging for food, corporations seeking maximal profits, and athletes training to win, all strive against others competing for the same goals. In this article, we establish the role of competitive pressures for the facilitation of optimal decision making in simple sequential binary choice tasks. In two experiments, competition was introduced with a computerized opponent whose choice behavior reinforced one of two strategies: If the opponent probabilistically imitated participant choices, probability matching was optimal; if the opponent was indifferent, probability maximizing was optimal. We observed accurate asymptotic strategy use in both conditions irrespective of the provision of outcome probabilities, suggesting that participants were sensitive to the differences in opponent behavior. An analysis of reinforcement learning models established that computational conceptualizations of opponent behavior are critical to account for the observed divergence in strategy adoption. Our results provide a novel appraisal of probability matching and show how this individually 'irrational' choice phenomenon can be socially adaptive under competition.

DOI 10.1016/j.cogpsych.2015.03.002
2014 Luckman A, Newell BR, van Ravenzwaaij D, Kary A, Lewandowsky S, 'Discounting subjective and objective time: Implications for the immediacy, sign and magnitude effects. Manuscript submitted for publication', in press, . (2014)
2014 Cramer AOJ, van Ravenzwaaij D, Matzke D, Steingröver H, Wetzels R, Grasman RPPP, et al., 'Hidden multiplicity in multiway ANOVA: Prevalence, consequences, and remedies. Manuscript submitted for publication', in press, . (2014)
2014 van Ravenzwaaij D, Boekel W, Forstmann BU, Ratcliff R, Wagenmakers E-J, 'Action Video Games Do Not Improve the Speed of Information Processing in Simple Perceptual Tasks', JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-GENERAL, 143 1794-1805 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1037/a0036923
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2014 Van Ravenzwaaij D, Moore CP, Lee MD, Newell BR, 'A hierarchical bayesian modeling approach to searching and stopping in multi-attribute judgment', Cognitive Science, (2014) [C1]

In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. Ho... [more]

In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. How do decision makers determine in what sequence to collect information and when to stop? In two experiments, we administered a version of the German cities task developed by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996), in which participants had to decide which of two cities had the larger population. Decision makers were not provided with the names of the cities, but they were able to collect different kinds of cues for both response alternatives (e.g., "Does this city have a university?") before making a decision. Our experiments differed in whether participants were free to determine the number of cues they examined. We demonstrate that a novel model, using hierarchical latent mixtures and Bayesian inference (Lee & Newell, ) provides a more complete description of the data from both experiments than simple conventional strategies, such as the take-the-best or the Weighted Additive heuristics. © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

DOI 10.1111/cogs.12119
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2014 van Ravenzwaaij D, Moore CP, Lee MD, Newell BR, 'A hierarchical bayesian modeling approach to searching and stopping in multi-attribute judgment', Cognitive Science, 38 1384-1405 (2014) [C1]

In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. Ho... [more]

In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. How do decision makers determine in what sequence to collect information and when to stop? In two experiments, we administered a version of the German cities task developed by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996), in which participants had to decide which of two cities had the larger population. Decision makers were not provided with the names of the cities, but they were able to collect different kinds of cues for both response alternatives (e.g., "Does this city have a university?") before making a decision. Our experiments differed in whether participants were free to determine the number of cues they examined. We demonstrate that a novel model, using hierarchical latent mixtures and Bayesian inference (Lee & Newell, 2011) provides a more complete description of the data from both experiments than simple conventional strategies, such as the take-the-best or the Weighted Additive heuristics.

DOI 10.1111/cogs.12119
Citations Scopus - 2
2014 Huizenga HM, van Duijvenvoorde AC, van Ravenzwaaij D, Wetzels R, Jansen BR, 'Is the unconscious, if it exists, a superior decision maker?', Behav Brain Sci, 37 32-33 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.1017/S0140525X13000769
2013 Newell BR, van Ravenzwaaij D, Donkin C, 'A quantum of truth? Querying the alternative benchmark for human cognition', Behavioral Brain Sciences, 36 300-302 (2013) [C3]
2013 Newell BR, Koehler DJ, James G, Rakow T, van Ravenzwaaij D, 'Probability matching in risky choice: The interplay of feedback and strategy availability', MEMORY & COGNITION, 41 329-338 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.3758/s13421-012-0268-3
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2012 van Ravenzwaaij D, Mulder MJ, Tuerlinckx F, Wagenmakers EJ, 'Do the dynamics of prior information depend on task context? An analysis of optimal performance and an empirical test', Frontiers in Cognitive Science, 3:132 1-15 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2012 van Ravenzwaaij D, Dutilh G, Wagenmakers EJ, 'A diffusion model decomposition of the effects of alcohol on perceptual decision making', Psychopharmacology, 219 1017-2025 (2012)
2012 Dutilh G, van Ravenzwaaij D, Nieuwenhuis S, van der Maas HLJ, Forstmann BU, Wagenmakers EJ, 'How to measure post-error slowing: A confound and a simple solution', Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 56 208-216 (2012) [C1]
2012 van Ravenzwaaij D, van der Maas HLJ, Wagenmakers EJ, 'Optimal decision making in neural inhibition models', Psychological Review, 119 201-215 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 10
2012 Huizenga HM, Wetzels R, van Ravenzwaaij D, Wagenmakers EJ, 'Four empirical tests of Unconscious Thought Theory', Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 117 332-340 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.obhdp.2011.11.010
Citations Scopus - 11
2011 van Ravenzwaaij D, van der Maas HLJ, Wagenmakers EJ, 'Does the Name-Race Implicit Association Test Measure Racial Prejudice?', Experimental Psychology, 58 271-277 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1027/1618-3169/a000093
Citations Scopus - 12
2011 Van Ravenzwaaij D, Brown SD, Wagenmakers E-J, 'An integrated perspective on the relation between response speed and intelligence', Cognition, 119 381-393 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.cognition.2011.02.002
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 14
Co-authors Scott Brown
2011 van Ravenzwaaij D, Dutilh G, Wagenmakers EJ, 'Cognitive model decomposition of the BART: Assessment and application', Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 55 94-105 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.jmp.2010.08.010
Citations Scopus - 15
2009 van Ravenzwaaij D, Oberauer K, 'How to use the diffusion model: Parameter recovery of three methods: EZ, fast-dm, and DMAT', Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 53 463-473 (2009) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 18
2009 Keye D, Wilhelm O, Oberauer K, van Ravenzwaaij D, 'Individual differences in conflict-monitoring: Testing means and covariance hypothesis about the Simon and the Eriksen Flanker task', Psychological Research, 73 762-776 (2009) [C1]
2006 van Ravenzwaaij D, Hamel R, 'De Nederlandstalige WAIS-III na hernormering', De Psycholoog, 5 268-271 (2006)
Show 24 more journal articles

Conference (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 van Ravenzwaaij D, Newell BR, Moore CP, Lee MD, 'Using recognition in multi¿attribute decision environments', COGSCI 2013, Berlin (2013) [E2]
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 4
Total funding $396,883

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20143 grants / $392,883

How Do Our Past Decisions Affect Our Present Decisions? – An Innovative Model$384,183

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Don Van Ravenzwaaij
Scheme Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA)
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301274
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

How is Response Competition Implemented in the Brain? – A Critical Test and an Innovative Model$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Don Van Ravenzwaaij
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301325
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

How do our past decisions affect our present decisions? – An innovative model$3,700

Funding body: Keats Endowment Research Fund

Funding body Keats Endowment Research Fund
Project Team Doctor Don Van Ravenzwaaij
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400276
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20121 grants / $4,000

Faculty ECR Visiting Fellowship 2013$4,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Science & IT
Project Team Doctor Don Van Ravenzwaaij
Scheme ECR Visiting Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1401120
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

Commenced Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 How do our Past Decisions Affect our Present Decisions? An Innovative Model
Psychology, Faculty of Science and Information Technology
Principal Supervisor
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Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Netherlands 10
Australia 8
Belgium 2
Germany 2
United Kingdom 2
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Dr Don Van Ravenzwaaij

Position

DECRA Fellow
-
School of Psychology
Faculty of Science and Information Technology

Contact Details

Email don.vanravenzwaaij@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5662
Mobile -

Office

Room AVG11
Building Aviation Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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