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Associate Professor Deb Loxton

Associate Professor

Faculty of Health and Medicine (Public Health)

Career Summary

Biography

AProf Deborah Loxton’s health research focuses on women’s health and wellbeing with a particular emphasis on the impact of major life events. AProf Loxton has a strong interest in women’s reproductive health and has examined health behaviour during pregnancy, cervical cancer screening and abuse, maternal health in the first years of motherhood, and antenatal behaviours associated with negative birth outcomes. She is recognised as an expert in women’s health with particular knowledge of intimate partner abuse. Longitudinal methodology remains one of AProf Loxton’s primary research interests, as reflected by her work describing the methods and outcomes of longitudinal data collection and analysis.

She has used both quantitative and qualitative and is now undertaking various projects that link longitudinal survey data with other datasets, such as the Midwives Data Collection in NSW, the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). AProf Loxton has pursued new methods for examining longitudinal qualitative data. She has chaired two symposia on this topic at an international conference, as well as chairing and convening the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) Qualitative Health Research Group. AProf Loxton is the Deputy Director and member of the Steering Committee of the ALSWH at the Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing. The ALSWH is a longitudinal cohort study conducted with three age groups (aged 18-23, 45-50 and 70-75 in 1996) of over 40,000 Australian women. AProf Loxton leads the team in currently recruiting a new cohort of 18-23 year olds.

She has been responsible for operational oversight of the ALSWH since 2006 including survey design, cohort maintenance, data collection, budget and staff management. AProf Loxton’s ALSWH research responsibilities include contributing to the design and conduct of ALSWH major reports, publications and other forms of dissemination. The most recently released ALSWH report described women’s adherence to health guidelines, including pregnancy specific guidelines. AProf Loxton co-led another ALSWH report which focussed on women’s reproductive health. The latter was used extensively to develop the National Women’s Health Policy of 2010. Other government reports authored by AProf Loxton have covered such topics as the health impact of abuse, domestic violence programs, and barriers to service delivery for young pregnant women and mothers. AProf Loxton is a chief investigator on two projects: an ARC Linkage Grant (partnered with Family Planning NSW & Bayer Healthcare) that is exploring contraceptive use and access, and a Bupa Foundation grant examining maternal health outcomes in relation to mental health screening.

Throughout her career AProf Loxton has been awarded $1,321,881 million in competitive external grant funding, $564,772 in competitive internal grants, and over $14.5 million in government and external consultancy funding. AProf Loxton has built a national and international profile in her area of research, being an invited speaker and chairing symposia at international and national conferences. She has presented at nine international conferences and has been invited to speak on 15 different occasions at NGO and government events. Her research efforts have resulted in 43 journal publications (six in press), multiple conference presentations, one peer reviewed journal special edition, and ten major research reports for government. In recognition of her expertise in intimate partner abuse, the Sax Institute commissioned AProf Loxton to produce quarterly reports concerning recent research in domestic and family violence for distribution to NSW state government policy agencies in 2009-10. Additionally, her research on domestic and family violence and sole motherhood has generated significant media interest.

Research Expertise
AProf Loxton’s main areas of expertise are the impact of abuse on women’s health, women’s reproductive health, and longitudinal research methods. Her research reputation is largely built upon the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women’s Health (ALSWH). The research outputs of this study are substantive in their own right, as well as being a national resource recognised and used by the Australian government and used and valued by over 400 research collaborations. AProf Loxton’s work has had a significant impact on national policies relating to women’s health and wellbeing.

Teaching Expertise
AProf Loxton is currently supervising 11 PhD students, three of whom are examining facets of pregnancy and childbirth (postnatal depression, alcohol use during pregnancy, and perinatal mental health assessment). AProf Loxton also has a mentoring role within the research centre, leading paper writing and participating in grant writing workshops. In addition, AProf Loxton co-designed a statistics workshop for academics from non-statistics oriented backgrounds who wish to gain experience in epidemiological investigations.

Collaborations
AProf Loxton belongs to the Management and Leadership Group of the Priority Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing, and conducts seminars and workshops that contribute to the centre’s core business. Her involvement with the ALSWH includes collaborating with staff at the Universities of Queensland and Newcastle. AProf Loxton is a member of the NSW Population and Health Services Research Ethics Committee and has a keen interest in this area. AProf Loxton has recently formed collaborations between the centre and the USA Academy of Violence and Abuse and is in the process of formalising a collaboration with the Korean Women’s Development Institute. A number of research projects have provided AProf Loxton with the opportunity to work with researchers from the University of New South Wales, la Trobe University, University of Melbourne and the University of New England.


Qualifications

  • PhD, University of New England
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), University of New England
  • Diploma of Management, GE Consultancy Pty Ltd (RTO)

Keywords

  • Psychology - assessment
  • Psychology - research methods
  • Women's health
  • domestic violence
  • health service use
  • maternal health and wellbeing
  • mental health
  • reproductive health
  • social and economic wellbeing and health

Fields of Research

CodeDescriptionPercentage
111799Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified100

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
14/03/2014 - 30/06/2015Associate ProfessorUniversity of Newcastle
Faculty of Health and Medicine
Australia
26/02/2012 - 30/06/2012Casual AcademicUniversity of Newcastle
School of Psychology
Australia

Academic appointment

DatesTitleOrganisation / Department
1/01/2010 - Membership - NSW Population Health Services Research Research Ethics CommitteeNSW Population Health Services Research Research Ethics Committee
Australia
1/01/2009 - Membership - Australian Women's Health NetworkAustralian Women's Health Network
Australia
1/01/2008 - 31/12/2010Membership - Medical Outcomes Database Project Scientifica Advisory CommitteeMedical Outcomes Database Project Scientifica Advisory Committee
Australia
1/01/2008 - Membership - USA Academy of Violence and AbuseUSA Academy of Violence and Abuse
United States
1/01/2004 - 1/12/2005Research ManagerUniversity of Newcastle
Research Centre for Gender Health and Ageing
Australia
1/06/2003 - 1/12/2004Senior Research Officer
<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="83"><colgroup><col width="83" /></colgroup><tbody><tr height="19"><td height="19" style="height:14.4pt;width:62pt;" width="83">Women's health</td></tr></tbody></table>
University of Newcastle
Research Centre for Gender Health and Ageing
Australia

Awards

Research Award

YearAward
2008Faculty Research Award
University of Newcastle
2001Keith and Dorothy McKay Travelling Scholarship
University of New England
1999APA PhD Scholarship
University of New England

Invitations

Participant

YearTitle / Rationale
2007Women's Health Summit, Sydney Town Hall
Organisation: Women's Health NSW Description: This summit was attended by over 500 health workers, academics and stakeholders with an interest in women's health. I was invited to speak about the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health and about my research into intimate partner violence and sole motherhood.
2005Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Organisation: Department of Health and Ageing Description: Invited presentation for the Department of Health and Ageing to present ALSWH findings on the health and wellbeing of women who had experienced intimate partner violence, attended by around 50 representatives from government departments in Canberra, 2005. This presentation was recorded on DVD and will be available for electronic distribution.
2004Health and economic wellbeing of Australian sole mothers.
Organisation: Office of the Status of Women Description: I was invited to present findings from a year long investigation I conducted into the health and economic wellbeing of sole mothers, at the Office of the Prime Minister and Cabinet by the Office of the Status of Women. Over 50 representatives from various government departments attended.
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2007Loxton DJ, Stewart Williams JA, Adamson LR, Barriers to Service Delivery for Young Pregnant Women and Mothers: Report to the National Youth Affairs Research Scheme (NYARS), National Youth Affairs Research Scheme, Canberra, 147 (2007) [A2]

Journal article (76 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2015Coles J, Lee A, Taft A, Mazza D, Loxton D, 'Childhood sexual abuse and its association with adult physical and mental health: results from a national cohort of young Australian women.', J Interpers Violence, 30 1929-1944 (2015)
DOI10.1177/0886260514555270Author URL
2015Loxton D, Powers J, Anderson AE, Townsend N, Harris ML, Tuckerman R, et al., 'Online and Offline Recruitment of Young Women for a Longitudinal Health Survey: Findings From the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1989-95 Cohort.', J Med Internet Res, 17 e109 (2015)
DOI10.2196/jmir.4261Author URL
Co-authorsAmy Anderson, Melissa Harris, Julie Byles
2015May-Ling JL, Loxton D, McLaughlin D, 'Trauma exposure and the subsequent risk of coronary heart disease among mid-aged women', JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 38 57-65 (2015)
DOI10.1007/s10865-014-9577-2Author URL
2015Coles J, Lee A, Taft A, Mazza D, Loxton D, 'General practice service use and satisfaction among female survivors of childhood sexual abuse', AUSTRALIAN FAMILY PHYSICIAN, 44 71-76 (2015)
Author URL
2015Coles J, Lee A, Taft A, Mazza D, Loxton D, 'General practice service use and satisfaction among female survivors of childhood sexual abuse', Australian Family Physician, 44 71-76 (2015)

Background: Because childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and adult violence are associated with poorer physical and mental health of women, our aim was to investigate the associations between CSA, adult violence experiences and general practice service use and satisfaction in a community sample of Australian women aged 28-33 years. Methods: Data of 9058 women from the 1973-78 cohort who completed Survey 4 of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were analysed. Results: Logistic regressions conducted indicated that after controlling for demographic variables, women with experiences of lifetime violence were more likely to have higher general practice service use compared to those without violence experiences. CSA was not associated with an increase in service use but was significantly associated with a decrease in service satisfaction. This finding remained significant even when they visited the general practice more frequently. Discussion: Implementing trauma-informed care is suggested as a way to improve the satisfaction of this patient group with complex needs.

2015Powers J, Tavener M, Graves A, Loxton D, 'Loss to follow-up was used to estimate bias in a longitudinal study: A new approach', Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, (2015)

Objectives: To examine bias arising from loss to follow-up due to lack of contact. Study Design and Setting: The 1973-1978 cohort of Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health was first surveyed in 1996 and followed up in 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009. At the 2000 survey, 9,688 women responded (responders), 2,972 could not be contacted, of whom 1,515 responded subsequently (temporary no contact) and 1,457 did not (permanent no contact). Characteristics were compared for these groups at baseline and follow-up in 2003, 2006, or 2009. Relative risk ratios were used to estimate bias. Results: No-contacts were younger, more likely to live in cities, to be less educated and stressed about money than responders. No-contacts were more likely to be in de facto relationships, separated, divorced, or widowed, to have experienced partner violence and be smokers. Compared with temporary no contact, permanent no contact were less educated, less likely to be studying or employed. Despite differences in prevalence estimates, relative odds ratios were close to one and had confidence intervals that included one, indicating little effect of bias. Conclusion: Although various characteristics were related to loss to follow-up, the relative risks estimates did not indicate serious bias due to loss to follow-up in this cohort of young women.

DOI10.1016/j.jclinepi.2015.01.010
2015Hure AJ, Chojenta CL, Powers JR, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Validity and Reliability of Stillbirth Data Using Linked Self-Reported and Administrative Datasets', JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, 25 30-37 (2015)
DOI10.2188/jea.JE20140032Author URL
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Jenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta, Julie Byles
2015Powers JR, Anderson AE, Byles JE, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, 'Do women grow out of risky drinking? A prospective study of three cohorts of Australian women', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2015)

Introduction and Aims: To examine women's drinking behaviour relative to Australian guidelines and identify associated factors over the lifespan. Design and Methods: Data came from three prospective cohorts of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health aged 18-23 (n=14247), 45-50 (n=13715) and 70-75 years (n=12432) when first surveyed in 1996. The same women were re-surveyed at roughly 3-year intervals until 2012. At each survey, four drinking behaviours were based on two guidelines: long-term drinking (no more than two standard drinks per day) and episodic drinking (no more than four standard drinks on an occasion): (i) no risk (within both guidelines); (ii) low episodic risk (less than once a month); high episodic risk (at least once a month); long-term risk (more than two drinks per day regardless of episodic drinking). Results: No risk drinking increased with age, low episodic risk drinking remained almost constant between ages 18 and 39, and high episodic risk drinking declined rapidly. Few women drank at long-term risk. Factors associated with risky drinking varied with age; however, being a past or current smoker consistently increased the risk, and risks for smokers increased with age. Risky drinking was less likely to be practised by women providing care and needing help with daily tasks, or by pregnant women and those living with children. Discussion and Conclusions: Risky drinking behaviour should be addressed in younger women and in those who smoke. Interventions to reduce risky drinking, possibly in combination with reducing smoking, could be offered through general practice centres.

DOI10.1111/dar.12246
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Amy Anderson, Julie Byles
2015Harris ML, Loxton D, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Harris et al. respond to "social media recruitment"', American Journal of Epidemiology, 181 750-751 (2015)
DOI10.1093/aje/kwv008
Co-authorsMelissa Harris
2015Harris ML, Loxton D, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Recruiting online: Lessons from a longitudinal survey of contraception and pregnancy intentions of young Australian women', American Journal of Epidemiology, 181 737-746 (2015)

Recruitment of young people for epidemiologic research remains challenging, with marked decreases in the effectiveness of face-to-face, mail, and telephone recruitment methods. We report on the implementation and feasibility of an innovative and flexible approach used to recruit participants for a longitudinal cohort study about contraceptive use and pregnancy (the Contraceptive Use, Pregnancy Intention, and Decisions (CUPID) Study). Australian women aged 18-23 years were recruited using a range of online, networking, and offline methods, including social media (primarily Facebook (Facebook Inc., Menlo Park, California; http://www.facebook.com)), face-to-face events, distribution of promotional material, and media releases. Over the course of the 1-year recruitment period (beginning in September 2012), a total of 3,795 eligible women were recruited to complete the online survey, at a cost of approximately A$11 per participant. This sample was found to be broadly representative of the Australian population of women aged 18-23 years in terms of demographic characteristics, with the exception of an overrepresentation of tertiary-educated women (88.7% compared with 72.6%). This study demonstrated that although current recruitment strategies are required to be innovative and flexible in order to engage young people in epidemiologic research, representative samples can be achieved online at reasonable cost.

DOI10.1093/aje/kwv006
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsMelissa Harris
2015Wigginton B, Harris ML, Loxton D, Herbert D, Lucke J, 'The feminisation of contraceptive use: Australian women's accounts of accessing contraception', FEMINISM & PSYCHOLOGY, 25 178-198 (2015)
DOI10.1177/0959353514562802Author URL
Co-authorsMelissa Harris
2015Harris ML, Byles JE, Sibbritt D, Loxton D, '"Just get on with it": qualitative insights of coming to terms with a deteriorating body for older women with osteoarthritis.', PLoS One, 10 e0120507 (2015)
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0120507Author URL
Co-authorsMelissa Harris, Julie Byles
2014Mishra GD, Hockey R, Powers J, Loxton D, Tooth L, Rowlands I, et al., 'Recruitment via the internet and social networking sites: The 1989-1995 cohort of the Australian longitudinal study on women's health', Journal of Medical Internet Research, 16 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.2196/jmir.3788
CitationsScopus - 2
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Julie Byles
2014Chojenta C, Harris S, Reilly N, Forder P, Austin M-P, Loxton D, 'History of pregnancy loss increases the risk of mental health problems in subsequent pregnancies but not in the postpartum', PLoS ONE, 9 (2014) [C1]

While grief, emotional distress and other mental health conditions have been associated with pregnancy loss, less is known about the mental health impact of these events during subsequent pregnancies and births. This paper examined the impact of any type of pregnancy loss on mental health in a subsequent pregnancy and postpartum. Data were obtained from a sub-sample (N = 584) of the 1973-78 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, a prospective cohort study that has been collecting data since 1996. Pregnancy loss was defined as miscarriage, termination due to medical reasons, ectopic pregnancy and stillbirth. Mental health outcomes included depression, anxiety, stress or distress, sadness or low mood, excessive worry, lack of enjoyment, and feelings of guilt. Demographic factors and mental health history were controlled for in the analysis. Women with a previous pregnancy loss were more likely to experience sadness or low mood (AOR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.11 to 2.76, p = 0.0162), and excessive worry (AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.24 to 3.24, p = 0.0043) during a subsequent pregnancy, but not during the postpartum phase following a subsequent birth. These results indicate that while women who have experienced a pregnancy loss are a more vulnerable population during a subsequent pregnancy, these deficits are not evident in the postpartum. © 2014 Chojenta et al.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0095038
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsPeta Forder, Catherine Chojenta
2014Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder PM, Powers J, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Risky drinking patterns are being continued into pregnancy: a prospective cohort study.', PLoS One, 9 e86171 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0086171Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsJenny Powers, F Kaylambkin, Peta Forder, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson
2014Dolja-Gore X, Loxton DJ, D'Este CA, Byles JE, 'Mental health service use: Is there a difference between rural and non-rural women in service uptake?', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 22 92-100 (2014) [C1]

This study examines differences in uptake of the Medicare items rolled out in 2006 under the 'Better Access Scheme' (BAS) between rural and non-rural Australian women. It compares differences in women's uptake of the BAS services by area of residence (ARIA+) across time using the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health (ALSWH) survey data linked to Medicare data. Women aged 28-33 years at the time the BAS was introduced that responded to the self-reported question on depression/anxiety and consented to linkage of their survey data with Medicare data (n=4316). Participants were grouped by ARIA+according to BAS use, diagnoses of anxiety/depression but no BAS use and other eligible women. Across all areas, women born 1973-1978 with a self-reported diagnosis of depression/anxiety or having treatment under the BAS had a significantly lower mean mental health score compared to other women. Significantly more women living in non-rural areas had used at least one service provided under the BAS initiative compared to women in outer regional, inner regional or remotes areas (21% versus 18% versus 13% versus 7%, respectively), and across all areas, 12% of women reported having a diagnosis of depression/anxiety but not been treated under the BAS. While there is a gradual uptake of the new BAS services, a large percentage of women who have a diagnosis of depression/anxiety have not been treated under the BAS. The data suggest that women in urban areas have been better able to take up the services compared to non-urban women. © 2014 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

DOI10.1111/ajr.12109
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Catherine Deste
2014Byles J, Leigh L, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Adherence to recommended health checks by women in mid-life: data from a prospective study of women across Australia', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 38 39-43 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1111/1753-6405.12180Author URL
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Catherine Chojenta
2014Harris ML, Herbert D, Loxton D, Dobson A, Wigginton B, Lucke JC, 'Recruiting young women for health surveys: Traditional random sampling methods are not cost-effective', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 38 495-495 (2014) [C3]
DOI10.1111/1753-6405.12281
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsMelissa Harris
2014Dixon SC, Herbert DL, Loxton D, Lucke JC, ''As many options as there are, there are just not enough for me': Contraceptive use and barriers to access among Australian women', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, 19 340-351 (2014) [C1]

Objective A comprehensive life course perspective of women's experiences in obtaining and using contraception in Australia is lacking. This paper explores free-text comments about contraception provided by women born between 1973 and 1978 who participated in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Methods The ALSWH is a national population-based cohort study involving over 40,000 women from three age groups, who are surveyed every three years. An initial search identified 1600 comments from 690 women across five surveys from 1996 (when they were aged 18-23 years) to 2009 (31-36 years). The analysis included 305 comments from 289 participants. Factors relating to experiences of barriers to access and optimal contraceptive use were identified and explored using thematic analysis. Results Five themes recurred across the five surveys as women aged: (i) side effects affecting physical and mental health; (ii) lack of information about contraception; (iii) negative experiences with health services; (iv) contraceptive failure; and (v) difficulty with accessing contraception. Conclusion Side effects of hormonal contraception and concerns about contraceptive failure influence women's mental and physical health. Many barriers to effective contraception persist throughout women's reproductive lives. Further research is needed into reducing barriers and minimising negative experiences, to ensure optimal contraceptive access for Australian women.

DOI10.3109/13625187.2014.919380
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2014Tavener M, Byles J, Loxton D, 'Expert perceptions of the popular baby boomer image', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 33 E31-E35 (2014)
DOI10.1111/ajag.12087
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Meredith Tavener
2014Tavener M, Byles J, Loxton D, 'Expert perceptions of the popular baby boomer image', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 33 E31-E35 (2014) [C1]

Aim: This paper explored how gerontology experts described baby boomers, whether they challenged the popular image, and if they provided alternatives to the popularly reported baby boomer behaviours and characteristics. Methods: Qualitative interviews were conducted with ten experts from different areas across Australia. The interviews were semi-structured and guided by a 'sense-making' approach to explore the baby boomer construct and identify expert narratives that differed from the popularly tendered image. Results: The majority of experts were identified as baby boomers and made use of phrases associated with the popular baby boomer image, such as 'cashed up', 'reinventing retirement' and 'sea change'. Lifestyle and wealth were recognised as staple features of the popular image. To a lesser degree, the experts also recognised alternative characteristics and behaviours, including people with disabilities and those who struggle financially. Conclusions: Experts appeared to identify with the popular baby boomer label, but not necessarily the accompanying stereotypes.

DOI10.1111/ajag.12087
Co-authorsMeredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2014Duffy L, Adams J, Sibbritt D, Loxton D, 'Complementary and alternative medicine for victims of intimate partner abuse: A systematic review of use and efficacy', Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2014 (2014) [C1]

Objectives. To examine: (i) the extent to which victims of intimate partner abuse (IPA) use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and (ii) the effects of CAM on their mental health. Methods. Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched for studies measuring the extent of CAM use amongst victims of IPA and trials assessing the impact of CAM on mental health amongst this population. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane collaboration tool. Results. No studies measuring the level of CAM use amongst IPA victims, and only three studies assessing the effect of CAM on the mental health of this population were identified. Two studies looked at yogic breathing, while one assessed the effect of music therapy. All three studies showed some beneficial effects; however, each had a small sample, brief intervention period, and no follow-up measurement and were considered to be at high risk of bias. Conclusions. The review found little evidence for the benefits of CAM for IPA victims. Findings suggest positive effects of music therapy and yogic breathing; however, methodological limitations mean that these results should be interpreted with caution. It is important that more research into the use and effects of CAM amongst this population are undertaken. © 2014 Luke Duffy et al.

DOI10.1155/2014/963967
2014Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Austin M-P, 'The impact of routine assessment of past or current mental health on help-seeking in the perinatal period', Women and Birth, (2014) [C1]

Background: Clinical practice guidelines now recommend that women be asked about their past or current mental health as a routine component of maternity care. However, the value of this line of enquiry in increasing engagement with support services, as required, remains controversial. Aim: The current study aimed to examine whether assessment of past or current mental health, received with or without referral for additional support, is associated with help-seeking during pregnancy and the postpartum. Methods: A subsample of women drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (young cohort) who reported experiencing significant emotional distress during pregnancy (N = 398) or in the 12 months following birth (N = 380) participated in the study. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that women who were not asked about their emotional health were less likely to seek any formal help during both pregnancy (adjOR = 0.09, 95%CI: 0.04-0.24) and the postpartum (adjOR = 0.07, 95%CI: 0.02-0.13), as were women who were asked about these issues but who were not referred for additional support (antenatal: adjOR = 0.26, 95%CI: 0.15-0.45; postnatal: adjOR = 0.14, 95%CI: 0.07-0.27). However, considerable levels of consultation with general practitioners, midwives and child health nurses, even in the absence of referral, were evident. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that enquiry by a health professional about women's past or current mental health is associated with help-seeking throughout the perinatal period. The clinical and resource implications of these findings for the primary health care sector should be considered prior to the implementation of future routine perinatal depression screening or psychosocial assessment programmes. © 2014 Australian College of Midwives.

DOI10.1016/j.wombi.2014.07.003
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Peta Forder
2014Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Women's perceptions of information about alcohol use during pregnancy: a qualitative study.', BMC Public Health, 14 1048 (2014) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-14-1048Author URL
Co-authorsF Kaylambkin, Alexis Hure, Amy Anderson
2013Loxton D, Powers J, Fitzgerald D, Forder P, Anderson A, Taft A, Hegarty K, 'The Community Composite Abuse Scale: Reliability and Validity of a Measure of Intimate Partner Violence in a Community Survey from the ALSWH', Journal of Women's Health, Issues & Care, 2 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.4172/2325-9795.1000115
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Peta Forder, Amy Anderson
2013Vashum KP, McEvoy M, Shi Z, Milton AH, Islam MR, Sibbritt D, et al., 'Is dietary zinc protective for type 2 diabetes? Results from the Australian longitudinal study on women's health', BMC Endocrine Disorders, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1472-6823-13-40
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsJulie Byles, John Attia, Milton Hasnat, Amanda Patterson
2013Loxton D, Robertson J, Walkom EJ, 'Costs of medicines and health care: a concern for Australian women across the ages.', BMC Health Services Research, 13 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1472-6963-13-484Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1
2013Rich JL, Byrne JM, Curryer C, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Prevalence and correlates of depression among Australian women: A systematic literature review, January 1999- January 2010', BMC Research Notes, 6 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1756-0500-6-424
Co-authorsJane Rich, Julie Byles
2013Baker AT, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, McLaughlin D, Graves A, Dobson A, 'Utility and acceptability of the modified telephone interview for cognitive status in a longitudinal study of Australian women aged 85 to 90', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 61 1217-1220 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jgs.12333
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsJulie Byles
2013Lucke JC, Herbert DL, Watson M, Loxton D, 'Predictors of Sexually Transmitted Infection in Australian Women: Evidence from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', ARCHIVES OF SEXUAL BEHAVIOR, 42 237-246 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s10508-012-0020-xAuthor URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2013Adams J, Sibbritt D, Broom A, Loxton D, Wardle J, Pirotta M, Lui C, 'Complementary and Alternative Medicine Consultations in Urban and Nonurban Areas: A National Survey of 1427 Australian Women', Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 36 12-19 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.jmpt.2012.12.010Author URL
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 2
2013Harris ML, Loxton D, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'The Influence of Perceived Stress on the Onset of Arthritis in Women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', ANNALS OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE, 46 9-18 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s12160-013-9478-6Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsMelissa Harris, Julie Byles
2013Powers JR, McDermott LJ, Loxton DJ, Chojenta CL, 'A Prospective Study of Prevalence and Predictors of Concurrent Alcohol and Tobacco Use During Pregnancy', MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH JOURNAL, 17 76-84 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1007/s10995-012-0949-3Author URL
CitationsScopus - 5Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta
2013Herbert DL, Loxton D, Bateson D, Weisberg E, Lucke JC, 'Challenges for Researchers Investigating Contraceptive Use and Pregnancy Intentions of Young Women Living in Urban and Rural Areas of Australia: Face-to-Face Discussions to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Survey', JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, 15 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.2196/jmir.2266Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2013Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Forder P, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Predictors of antenatal alcohol use among Australian women: A prospective cohort study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 120 1366-1374 (2013) [C1]

Objective To identify predictors of antenatal alcohol consumption among women who usually consume alcohol. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Population or Sample A total of 1969 women sampled from the ALSWH 1973-78 cohort. Methods Women were included if they were pregnant in 2000, 2003, 2006 or 2009. The relationship between antenatal alcohol consumption and sociodemographics, reproductive health, mental health, physical health, health behaviours, alcohol guidelines and healthcare factors was investigated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Main outcome measures Alcohol use during pregnancy. Results Most (82.0%) women continued to drink alcohol during pregnancy. Women were more likely to drink alcohol during pregnancy if they had consumed alcohol on a weekly basis before pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.13-1.90), binge drank before pregnancy (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.76-2.94), or if they were pregnant while alcohol guidelines recommended low alcohol versus abstinence (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.26-2.03). Drinking during pregnancy was less likely if women had a Health Care Card (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.45-0.88) or if they had ever had fertility problems (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.48-0.86). Conclusions Most Australian women who drank alcohol continued to do so during pregnancy. Prepregnancy alcohol consumption was one of the main predictors of antenatal alcohol use. Alcohol guidelines, fertility problems and Health Care Card status also impacted antenatal alcohol consumption. © 2013 RCOG.

DOI10.1111/1471-0528.12356
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Peta Forder, Amy Anderson, F Kaylambkin, Jenny Powers
2013Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Disparities in reported psychosocial assessment across public and private maternity settings: a national survey of women in Australia', BMC Public Health, 13 632 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1186/1471-2458-13-632Author URL
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Peta Forder
2013Reilly N, Harris S, Loxton D, Chojenta C, Forder P, Milgrom J, Austin M, 'Referral for Management of Emotional Health Issues During the Perinatal Period: Does Mental Health Assessment Make a Difference?', Birth, 40 297-306 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/birt.12067Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Peta Forder
2013Loxton D, Chojenta C, Anderson AE, Powers JR, Shakeshaft A, Burns L, 'Acquisition and Utilization of Information About Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Among Australian Pregnant Women and Service Providers', Journal of Midwifery & Women¿s Health, 58 523-530 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jmwh.12014
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Amy Anderson, Catherine Chojenta
2013Schofield MJ, Powers JR, Loxton D, 'Mortality and Disability Outcomes of Self-Reported Elder Abuse: A 12-Year Prospective Investigation', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 61 679-685 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1111/jgs.12212Author URL
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2013Powers JR, Loxton DJ, O'Mara AT, Chojenta CL, Ebert L, 'Regardless of where they give birth, women living in non-metropolitan areas are less likely to have an epidural than their metropolitan counterparts', WOMEN AND BIRTH, 26 E77-E81 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.wombi.2012.12.001Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Lyn Ebert, Jenny Powers
2013Teede HJ, Joham AE, Paul E, Moran LJ, Loxton D, Jolley D, Lombard C, 'Longitudinal weight gain in women identified With polycystic ovary syndrome: Results of an observational study in young women', Obesity, 21 1526-1532 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1002/oby.20213Author URL
CitationsScopus - 20Web of Science - 21
2013Hure AJ, Powers JR, Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton D, 'Poor Adherence to National and International Breastfeeding Duration Targets in an Australian Longitudinal Cohort', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0054409Author URL
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Catherine Chojenta, Alexis Hure, Julie Byles
2013Rich JL, Chojenta C, Loxton D, 'Quality, Rigour and Usefulness of Free-Text Comments Collected by a Large Population Based Longitudinal Study - ALSWH', PLOS ONE, 8 (2013) [C1]
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0068832Author URL
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Jane Rich
2012Harris ML, Loxton DJ, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'The relative importance of psychosocial factors in arthritis: Findings from 10,509 Australian women', Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 73 251-256 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Melissa Harris
2012Rich JL, Wright SL, Loxton DJ, ''Patience, hormone replacement therapy and rain!' Women, ageing and drought in Australia: Narratives from the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Journal of Rural Health, 20 324-328 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsJane Rich, Sarah Wright
2012Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Baker J, Rich JL, Dobson AJ, 'Empirical evidence suggests adverse climate events have not affected Australian women's health and well-being', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 452-457 (2012) [C1]
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Jane Rich
2012Anderson AE, Hure AJ, Powers JR, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Loxton DJ, 'Determinants of pregnant women's compliance with alcohol guidelines: A prospective cohort study', BMC Public Health, 12 1-10 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsAmy Anderson, F Kaylambkin, Alexis Hure, Jenny Powers
2012Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, 'How do previous mental health, social support, and stressful life events contribute to postnatal depression in a representative sample of Australian women?', Journal of Midwifery & Womens Health, 57 145-150 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta
2012Hure AJ, Powers JR, Mishra GD, Herbert DL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, 'Miscarriage, preterm delivery, and stillbirth: Large variations in rates within a cohort of Australian women', PLOS One, 7 1-8 (2012) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Jenny Powers, Alexis Hure
2011Adams J, Sibbritt DW, Broom A, Loxton DJ, Pirotta M, Humphreys J, Lui C-W, 'A comparison of complementary and alternative medicine users and use across geographical areas: A national survey of 1,427 women', BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11 85 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 15
2011Stavrou E, Vajdic CM, Loxton DJ, Pearson S-A, 'The validity of self-reported cancer diagnoses and factors associated with accurate reporting in a cohort of older Australian women', Cancer Epidemiology, 35 e75-e80 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2011Byles JE, Dolja-Gore X, Loxton DJ, Parkinson L, Stewart Williams JA, 'Women's uptake of medicare benefits schedule mental health items for general practitioners, psychologists and other allied mental health professionals', Medical Journal of Australia, 194 175-179 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsL Parkinson, Julie Byles
2011Mackerras D, Powers JR, Boorman J, Loxton DJ, Giles GG, 'Estimating the impact of mandatory fortification of bread with iodine on pregnant and post-partum women', Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 65 1118-1122 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2011Burns L, Black E, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Elliott E, Shakeshaft A, Dunlop AJ, 'Geographic and maternal characteristics associated with alcohol use in pregnancy', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35 1-8 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 3
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2011Lucke J, Herbert D, Loxton DJ, Weisberg E, 'Unintended pregnancies: Reducing rates by improving access to contraception', Australian Family Physician, 40 849 (2011) [C3]
CitationsScopus - 4Web of Science - 4
2011Astbury J, Bruck D, Loxton DJ, 'Forced sex: A critical factor in the sleep difficulties of young Australian women', Violence and Victims, 26 53-72 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2011Dolja-Gore X, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hockey RL, Dobson AJ, 'Increased bulk-billing for general practice consultations in regional and remote areas, 2002-2008', Medical Journal of Australia, 195 203-204 (2011) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 3Web of Science - 4
Co-authorsJulie Byles
2010Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Burns LA, Shakeshaft A, Elliott EJ, Dunlop AJ, 'Assessing pregnant women's compliance with different alcohol guidelines: An 11-year prospective study', Medical Journal of Australia, 192 690-693 (2010) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2010Powers JR, Loxton DJ, 'The impact of attrition in an 11-Year prospective longitudinal study of younger women', Annals of Epidemiology, 20 318-321 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.01.002
CitationsScopus - 40Web of Science - 37
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2010Lucke JC, Brown W, Tooth L, Loxton DJ, Byles JE, Spallek M, et al., 'Health across generations: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Biological Research for Nursing, 12 162-170 (2010) [C1]
DOI10.1177/1099800410373804
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authorsJenny Powers, Julie Byles
2009Loxton DJ, Powers JR, Schofield M, Hussain R, Hosking SJ, 'Inadequate cervical cancer screening among mid-aged Australian women who have experienced partner violence', Preventive Medicine, 48 184-188 (2009) [C1]
DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2008.10.019
CitationsScopus - 7Web of Science - 8
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2007Loxton DJ, Byles JE, Dobson A, Brown WJ, 'Conducting longitudinal research: Practical lessons from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 (2007) [C2]
Co-authorsJulie Byles
2007Loxton DJ, 'Editorial', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 78-79 (2007) [C3]
2007Warner-Smith PA, Loxton DJ, Brown WJ, 'Human Resources for Longitudinal Studies: Matching people to skills and tasks', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 92-103 (2007) [C1]
DOI10.5172/mra.455.1.2.92
2007Loxton DJ, Young AF, 'Longitudinal survey development and design', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 114-125 (2007) [C1]
Co-authorsAnne Young
2007Chojenta CL, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Mooney RH, 'Communication and dissemination of longitudinal study findings', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 199-209 (2007) [C1]
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Julie Byles
2007Helman J, Loxton DJ, Adamson LR, Graves AM, Powers JR, 'Conducting substudies in a longitudinal research project', International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches, 1 187-198 (2007) [C1]
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2006Loxton DJ, Mooney RH, Young AF, 'The psychological health of sole mothers in Australia', Medical Journal of Australia, 184 265-268 (2006) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 19Web of Science - 14
Co-authorsAnne Young
2006Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'Psychological health in midlife among women who have ever lived with a violent partner or spouse', Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 21 1092-1107 (2006) [C1]
DOI10.1177/0886260506290290
CitationsScopus - 25Web of Science - 20
2006Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, Mishra G, 'History of domestic violence and physical health in midlife', Violence against Women, 12 715-731 (2006) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 20Web of Science - 16
2004Loxton DJ, Schofield M, Hussain R, 'History of domestic violence and health service use among mid-aged Australian women', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 28 383-388 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1467-842X.2004.tb00448.x
CitationsScopus - 8Web of Science - 7
2004Minichiello V, Plummer D, Loxton DJ, 'Factors predicting sexual relationships in older people: an Australian study', Australasian Journal on Ageing, 23 125-130 (2004) [C1]
DOI10.1111/j.1741-6612.2004.00018.x
CitationsScopus - 15Web of Science - 8
2002Hussain R, Schofield M, Loxton D, 'Cosmetic surgery history and health service use in midlife: Women's Health Australia', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 176 576-579 (2002)
Author URL
CitationsWeb of Science - 3
2001Hussain R, Schofield MJ, Loxton D, 'Cosmetic surgery history is related to higher health service use in mid-life: Womens Health Australia', The Medical Journal of Australia, 176 576-579 (2001) [C1]
2001Schofield MJ, Hussain R, Loxton D, Miller Z, 'Psychosocial and health behavioural covariates of cosmetic surgery: Women''s Health Australia study', Journal of Health Psychology, 7 445-457 (2001) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 13Web of Science - 12
2000Minichiello V, Plummer D, Loxton D, 'Knowledge and Beliefs of Older Australians about Sexuality and Health (2000) [C1]
CitationsScopus - 5
Show 73 more journal articles

Conference (24 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2014Dolja-Gore X, Loxton D, D'este C, Byles J, 'HOW EFFECTIVE ARE AUSTRALIAN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELLING SERVICES FOR WOMEN WITH POOR MENTAL HEALTH?', VALUE IN HEALTH (2014) [E3]
Author URL
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Catherine Deste
2013Parsons VLM, O'Brien LM, James CG, Loxton DJ, 'Paramedics under mental health legislation in Australia', Abstracts of the XXXIIIrd International Congress on Law and Mental Health, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsLouise Obrien, Colin James
2013Chojenta C, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, Forder P, 'A longitudinal analysis of the predictors and antecedents of postnatal depression in Australian women', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Peta Forder
2013Herbert D, Harris ML, Loxton D, Lucke J, 'Contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy among 18-23 year old women in Australia: the first findings of the CUPID study', European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care, Copenhagen, Denmark (2013) [E3]
Co-authorsMelissa Harris
2013Loxton D, Chojenta C, 'Intimate partner abuse and perinatal mental health', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Paris, France (2013) [E3]
DOI10.1007/s00737-013-0355-xAuthor URL
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta
2012Loxton DJ, 'Survival among women who have experiences abuse in older age', Abstracts. National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence, San Francisco, CA (2012) [E3]
2012Breen C, Burns L, Conroy E, Powers J, Loxton DJ, Hutchinson D, et al., 'Caring for individuals affected by foetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Positives, challenges and suggestions for improvement', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012, Melbourne, Vic (2012) [E3]
2012Parsons V, O'Brien LM, Loxton DJ, James C, 'Constructing a social narrative on the foundation of shared experiences: A common bond between mental health nurses and paramedics in pre-hospital mental health care', International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Darwin (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsLouise Obrien
2012Gresham E, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, Hure AJ, 'Poorer diet quality predicts hypertension in pregnancy', Nutrition & Dietetics: Special Issue: Dietitians Association of Australia 16th International Congress of Dietetics, Sydney, NSW (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Julie Byles
2012Anderson AE, Loxton DJ, Kay-Lambkin FJ, Powers JR, 'Compliance with alcohol guidelines for pregnant women: Using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Journal of Women's Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsAmy Anderson, Jenny Powers, F Kaylambkin
2012Loxton DJ, Rich JL, Chojenta CL, 'Is there anything you would like to add?: Responses to open-ended survey questions as research data', Journal of Womens Health, Washington, DC (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta, Jane Rich
2012Francis LM, Loxton DJ, James CG, 'Navigating the journal to quality care. Nurses and midwives responding to women experiencing domestic violence: How can we advance the provision of assistance to women on this journey?', 2nd Australian Capital Region Nursing & Midwifery Research Conference, Canberra, ACT (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsColin James
2012Francis LM, Loxton DJ, James CG, 'Something in me had changed: How women leave or end domestic violence', AQR/Discourse, Power Resistance DPR 'Down Under' Conference 2012, Darwin (2012) [E3]
Co-authorsColin James
2011Francis LM, Loxton DJ, ''Something in me had changed'. How women end domestic violence', 17th International Conference of the Nursing Network on Violence Against Women Conference Handbook, Auckland, NZ (2011) [E3]
2011Byles JE, Dolja-Gore X, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Dobson A, 'Pap tests and mammograms: Are there urban/rural differences in take-up in women?', Posters - Abstracts. 11th National Rural Health Conference, Perth, WA (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Jenny Powers
2011Chojenta CL, Loxton DJ, Lucke J, ''The perfect mother wouldn't have that': Australian women's experiences of motherhood and postnatal depression', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (2011) [E3]
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta
2010Astbury J, Bruck D, Loxton DJ, 'Sexual violence as a predictor of sleep difficulties in a community sample of young women', Sleep & Biological Rhythms, Christchurch, NZ (2010) [E3]
2010Harris ML, Loxton DJ, Sibbritt DW, Byles JE, 'Psychosocial characteristics of midlife women with arthritis: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', 2010 National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing:, Newcastle, NSW (2010) [E3]
Co-authorsJulie Byles, Melissa Harris
2010Teede HJ, Deeks AA, Gibson-Helm M, Lombard C, Jolley D, Paul E, et al., 'Body mass index as a predictor of polycystic ovary syndrome risk: Results of a longitudinal cohort study', Endocrine Reviews. ENDO2010 Abstracts, San Diego, CA (2010) [E3]
2010Stavrou EP, Loxton DJ, 'The validation of self-reported cancer in Australian women: The Australian Longitudinal Study in Women's Health', American Journal of Epidemiology, Anaheim, Solomon Islands (2010) [E3]
2009Powers JR, Loxton DJ, 'Does wave non-response affect the results in longitudinal studies?', Australasian Epidemiologist, Dunedin, NZ (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsJenny Powers
2009Chojenta CL, Lucke J, Loxton DJ, 'Does social support reduce the likelihood of postnatal depression in Australian mothers?', Archives of Women's Mental Health, Sydney, NSW (2009) [E3]
Co-authorsCatherine Chojenta
2009Tavener MA, Byles JE, Loxton DJ, 'Identity construction in baby boomer women', Australasian Journal on Ageing, Canberra, ACT (2009) [E3]
DOI10.1111/j.1741-6612.2009.00397.x
Co-authorsMeredith Tavener, Julie Byles
2005Loxton DJ, 'From the smallness of the community, comes the strength of the community: Sole mothering in rural and remote Australia', 8th National Rural Health Conference Program and Papers, Alice Springs, NT (2005) [E2]
Show 21 more conferences

Report (1 outputs)

YearCitationAltmetricsLink
2012Dobson A, Byles JE, Brown W, Mishra G, Loxton DJ, Hockey R, et al., 'Adherence to health guidelines: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health', Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, 90 (2012) [R1]
Co-authorsAlexis Hure, Julie Byles, Amy Anderson, Catherine Chojenta, Jenny Powers
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants30
Total funding$10,553,974

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20153 grants / $125,114

House and Home: Pathways and alternatives to residential aged care for older Australian women$91,024

Funding body: IRT (Illawarra Retirement Trust)

Funding bodyIRT (Illawarra Retirement Trust)
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deirdre McLaughlin, Mrs Peta Forder, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeResearch Foundation Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1400841
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Indigenous Reproductive Healthcare Pilot$25,000

Funding body: Family Planning NSW

Funding bodyFamily Planning NSW
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Jayne Lucke
SchemeResearch Project
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500628
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Reaping the Benefits: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health$9,090

Funding body: NSW Trade & Investment

Funding bodyNSW Trade & Investment
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeNSW Research Attraction and Acceleration Program (RAAP) Conference Sponsorship Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2015
Funding Finish2015
GNoG1500548
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

20144 grants / $283,044

Mothers' and their Children's Health: understanding disparities in health and health service use among young Australian families$240,000

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Gita Mishra, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Virginia Slaughter, Dr Kylie Hesketh, Associate Professor Leigh Tooth, Professor Ilona Koupil
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1400700
Type Of FundingNot Known
CategoryUNKN
UONY

The role of perceived stress on the onset of type 2 diabetes in women.$21,500

Funding body: John Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust Fund

Funding bodyJohn Hunter Hospital Charitable Trust Fund
Project TeamDoctor Melissa Harris, Professor John Attia, Doctor Judy Luu, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1301440
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

Dietary iron during pregnancy: finding the right balance$20,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Alexis Hure, Doctor Amanda Patterson, Doctor Liz Holliday, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Dr Amina Khambalia
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1401399
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

Australasian Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Conference$1,544

Funding body: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

Funding bodyFoundation for Alcohol Research and Education
Project TeamMiss Amy Anderson, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeAOD Conference Attendance Scholarship Program
RoleLead
Funding Start2014
Funding Finish2014
GNoG1300901
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

20133 grants / $1,781,105

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health New Young Cohort and Older Cohort Project $1,755,111

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding bodyDepartment of Health
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Gita Mishra
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1301206
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

A life course perspective on the identification of risk factors for low birth weight$23,994

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamDoctor Alexis Hure, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta, Ms Amy Anderson, Doctor Melissa Harris
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300904
Type Of FundingGrant - Aust Non Government
Category3AFG
UONY

2012 EIA Impact Trial travel grant$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2013
Funding Finish2013
GNoG1300375
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20122 grants / $2,208,287

Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (Renewal of funding 2012-13 to 2014-15) $2,206,287

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding bodyDepartment of Health
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Annette Dobson
SchemeConsultancy/Tender
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1201195
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Women's Health 2012 Congress, Grand Hyatt in Washing DC, 16 - 18 March 2012$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2012
Funding Finish2012
GNoG1200503
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20114 grants / $2,798,310

Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health: The new 1989-94 Young Cohort and 1921-26 Cohort follow-up$2,625,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding bodyDepartment of Health
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeConsultancy/Tender
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100838
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Perinatal mental health assessment: Does it improve maternal health outcomes?$136,760

Funding body: BUPA Health Foundation

Funding bodyBUPA Health Foundation
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Catherine Chojenta
SchemeProject Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100152
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

The mental health of women who binge drink$34,550

Funding body: NSW Health

Funding bodyNSW Health
Project TeamMs Jennifer Powers, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeDrug and Alcohol Council Research Grants Program
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1000947
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

Academy of Violence and Abuse 2011 Scientific Assembly: The Developing Science of Violence and Abuse: Toward a New Undestanding$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2011
Funding Finish2011
GNoG1100385
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20103 grants / $104,392

A longitudinal study of patterns of contraception use and access to contraceptive information, advice and services for young Australian women$74,545

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding bodyARC (Australian Research Council)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Jayne Lucke, Professor Christina Lee, Professor Annette Dobson, Professor Ian Fraser, Dr Edith Weisberg
SchemeLinkage Projects
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000904
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Prevalence and correlates of depression among women in Australia: A literature review 1999-2009$27,847

Funding body: Beyond Blue Ltd

Funding bodyBeyond Blue Ltd
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000166
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

Challenging the Boundaries, 16th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites, Vancouver, British Columbia, 3 - 5 October 2010$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2010
Funding Finish2010
GNoG1000802
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20094 grants / $2,407,985

The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (Renewal of funding)$2,368,500

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding bodyDepartment of Health
Project TeamProfessor Annette Dobson, Professor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeConsultancy/Tender
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189875
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category2OPC
UONY

Uptake and impact of new Medicare Benefits Schedule Items - Psychologists and Other Allied Mental Health Professionals$31,990

Funding body: Australian Rotary Health

Funding bodyAustralian Rotary Health
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Conjoint Associate Professor Lynne Parkinson, Mr Richard Gibson, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams, Doctor Paul Kowal
SchemeMental Health Research Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189463
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category1NS
UONY

Research report: Women's health in the east of Victoria$4,995

Funding body: Womens Health East

Funding bodyWomens Health East
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0190059
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

Sowing the seeds of academic change: Nuturing new paradigms, Bloomington MInnesota, USA 24-25 April 2009$2,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2009
Funding Finish2009
GNoG0189896
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20082 grants / $197,308

CAM use among mid-age women as national mixed-methods study across the urban-rural divide$180,308

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding bodyNHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton, Professor Jon Adams, Conjoint Professor David Sibbritt, Dr Marie Pirotta, Professor John Humphries, Professor Marc Cohen, Doctor Alexander Broom
SchemeComplementary and Alternative Medicine
RoleLead
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0188978
Type Of FundingAust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category1CS
UONY

Domestic Violence$17,000

Funding body: The Sax Institute

Funding bodyThe Sax Institute
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton, Doctor Jenny Stewart Williams
SchemeProject Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2008
Funding Finish2008
GNoG0189568
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20062 grants / $554,772

Adequacy and equity of treatment for depression among older Australian women$11,000

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding bodyHunter Medical Research Institute
Project TeamProfessor Julie Byles, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeResearch Grant
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2006
Funding Finish2006
GNoG0186177
Type Of FundingContract - Aust Non Government
Category3AFC
UONY

20052 grants / $43,400

Data provision for the Women's Data Warehouse $42,500

Funding body: Department of Family and Community Services

Funding bodyDepartment of Family and Community Services
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton, Ms Jennifer Powers, Associate Professor Anne Young
SchemeConsultancy/Tender
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0185597
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY

8th National Rural Health Conference, 10-13 March 2005$900

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding bodyUniversity of Newcastle
Project TeamAssociate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeTravel Grant
RoleLead
Funding Start2005
Funding Finish2005
GNoG0185200
Type Of FundingInternal
CategoryINTE
UONY

20041 grants / $50,257

Barriers to service delivery for young pregnant women and mothers.$50,257

Funding body: Department of Family and Community Services

Funding bodyDepartment of Family and Community Services
Project TeamDoctor Penelope Warner-Smith, Associate Professor Deb Loxton
SchemeConsultancy/Tender
RoleInvestigator
Funding Start2004
Funding Finish2004
GNoG0183788
Type Of FundingOther Public Sector - State
Category2OPS
UONY
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

CommencedResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015The Implications of Public Gendered Violence Discourses on Women's Embodied Social Navigation in Contemporary Australia
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014Exploring the use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception in a Cohort of Young, Australian Women
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014Optimizing Effectiveness of Female Community Health Volunteers for Improved Reproductive Health Outcomes in Nepal
Medical Studies, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2012Women of Courage: Comprehensive Court Preparation and Support for Women Survivors of Sexual Assault
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2012Intimate partner violence in Australia: Impact of rurality on vulnerability, prevalence and effects
Health, University of New England
Co-Supervisor
2011Modifiable Predictors of Mental Health Services Utilisation for Australian Women
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2010Assessing Alcohol Use in Pregnant Women Using Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2009Perinatal mental health assessment: impact on service utilisation and maternal health outcomes.
Psychiatry, University of New South Wales
Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

YearResearch Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015Exploring Social Supports/Support Services and Decisions to Leave or Change with Women Who Have Experienced Domestic Partner Violence
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014Clinical Decision Making and the Role of Paramedics Fulfilling their Legislative Powers Under the Mental Health Act 2007 (NSW). A Qualitative Study
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2014The Nature of Things: An Interdisciplinary Investigation Into the Experiences and Impacts of Drought For Three Generations of Australian Women
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013When Life's a Pain: Perceived Stress and Psychosocial Factors in Women with Arthritis Transitioning from Midlife to Older Age
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2013Prevalence, Antecedents and Perceptions of Efficacy of Treatments of Postnatal Depression in Australia
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Principal Supervisor
2010Your Bloomin' Lot: An Empirical Study of the Popular Baby Boomer Stereotype
Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine
Co-Supervisor
2008An Examination of the Structural and Political Barriers Preventing Permanent Resident Overseas-Trained Doctors From Working as General Practitioners in Rural New South Wales
Business Management, Faculty of Business and Law
Co-Supervisor
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News

women health

Go to WHoA! – Gen Ys helping to shape health care future

April 29, 2014

More than 17,000 young women bucked the stereotypical 'Generation Me' tag last year to complete a wide-ranging medical survey that will help shape the future of Australia's health care services.

Ms Amy Anderson

Alcohol during pregnancy

November 19, 2013

Research from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH) has revealed that eight in ten expectant mothers consume alcohol during their pregnancy.

Associate Professor Deb Loxton

Position

Associate Professor
Research Centre for Gender, Health and Ageing
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Public Health

Contact Details

Emaildeborah.loxton@newcastle.edu.au
Phone(02) 40420690
Mobile0438841502
Fax4042 0044

Office

RoomHMRI 4306
BuildingHMRI Building
LocationHMRI Building

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