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Dr Catherine Grant

Research Academic

School of Creative Arts (Music)

Working with communities to keep music strong

Music endangerment is not just a research field for Dr Catherine Grant; she is an activist and interventionist for communities that are suffering the cultural loss of their music traditions.

Dr Catherine Grant

Dr Catherine Grant is an ethnomusicologist in the School of Creative Arts at the University of Newcastle, Australia, whose focus is endangered music in Indigenous and minority communities. Her work is important to the revitalisation of traditional music, which assists in social cohesion, and a sense of individual and collective identity; in turn, this has benefits for the health and wellbeing of community members.

The threat to intangible cultural heritage is something that we should all be concerned about, in a way, like the environmental crisis. It doesn't pose a threat to the very existence of humanity but it certainly poses a risk to how we relate to each other as people.

"Music also contains knowledge of ancestors, kinship relations, the land, environment, food systems, and medicinal systems. This traditionally links with survival, but it also has the implications for the rest of us," Dr Grant said. "These songs tell history, give historical evidence and contain knowledge of potential importance. They also contribute to cultural diversity and intercultural relations.

"The threat to intangible cultural heritage is something that we should all be concerned about, in a way, like the environmental crisis. It doesn't pose a threat to the very existence of humanity but it certainly poses a risk to how we relate to each other as people."

Ethnomusicology, as a research discipline, began at the end of the 19th century, when it was known as 'comparative musicology'. By the 1950s/60s, its earlier focus on 'dying' cultures had been discredited as being overly romanticised and paternalistic.

In 2003 the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) adopted its Convention for the Urgent Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage. It wasn't until then, Dr Grant believes, ethnomusicologists started to look seriously at these issues again."The stereotypical picture was a researcher hiding behind a tree in a village somewhere with his recording gear – then taking it away to archive it somewhere. The community might never have seen any benefit from the research," said Dr Grant.

A classical pianist – who trained at the Queensland Conservatorium – and spent time overseas teaching English as a second language, Dr Grant said it was during her PhD that music endangerment became something more than a theoretical interest for her.

"Through talking to people during my fieldwork in North Vietnam and in the East Kimberley of Australia, I realised how important an issue this is to individuals and – if these situations that I was personally involved in were being replicated right around the globe – what a large-scale issue it is in the world."

She says she was struck by the fact that, unlike for languages, no one had developed a systematic way to gauge the strength of a music genre.

As a result, her research focus has been looking at the tools linguists use to assess the vitality of language and adapting them to music. After developing her own set of factors for judging a music genre's vitality, which she has titled the Music Vitality and Endangerment Framework or MVEF, she has presented the methodology in a book – Music Endangerment: How Language Maintenance Can Help (2014).

Now, Dr Grant is holding this framework up to 100 genres from across the world and collaborating with ethnomusicologists, music researchers, communities, and musicians to build a map of the vitality of the genres.

"If this turns out to be a useful tool, it could be carried further into something like the UNESCO map of endangered languages," said Dr Grant, referring to an atlas available on the UNESCO website which gives an overview of languages around the world and areas of the greatest language loss.

However, Dr Grant is not satisfied with what she calls "intellectual fun"; she is passionate about the communities and looks forward to more fieldwork.

 In a recent interview with the Boston Globe, Dr Grant said she objects to being called a 'preservationist'. "I'm more interested in working collaboratively with the communities to find the best ways for them to keep their cultural practices strong, if that's what they wish."

She has been personally involved in the revitalisation of music within communities. In 2013, she raised money via a crowd funding campaign to supply traditional instruments to a village in Cambodia.

During the devastation of the Pol Pot regime in the 1970s, the people of Cambodia experienced an almost complete loss of intangible cultural heritage; not only the practice but the transmission to younger generations.

"In Cambodia, quite often the artists spoke to me about identity – the 'soul' of Cambodia. Culture is the soul of a country and if you don't have the arts then a country doesn't thrive.

"I got the sense from speaking to the older people, in particular, that passing on their cultural knowledge and skills was their life purpose… the way that they could make a contribution to the country that they knew," said Dr Grant.

"My research is progressing to the stage where it is time for me to look at what can be done about music endangerment… to move into the areas of music maintenance and revitalisation and look at how we can support these communities keep their music strong.

"I would like to look at the initiatives that are going on around the world to revitalise music traditions, and their successes and failures – because there are many. There is just no overarching framework yet that could help indicate what might work in any one situation."

Dr Catherine Grant

Working with communities to keep music strong

Music endangerment is not just a research field for Dr Catherine Grant; she is an activist and interventionist for communities

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Career Summary

Biography

Dr Catherine Grant, PhD (Chancellor's Award), B.Mus.St.(1st class Hons), B.Arts, L.Mus.A. (distinction)

Catherine Grant has worked with the Indigenous Miriwoong people of the remote Australian East Kimberley, teachers and masters of traditional Khmer music in Cambodia, and the urban ca trù community of Hanoi, Vietnam, among other communities. Her award-winning doctoral research investigated ways to help communities like these around the world keep their music strong in the face of pressures from the changing global and local environment, by examining precedent from language maintenance. Her book, Music Endangerment: How Language Maintenance Can Help, was published by Oxford University Press in 2014. Catherine's research and activism into the global phenomenon of music endangerment has featured in a variety of media, including the Boston Globe, The Australian, The Conversation, The Cambodia Daily, and several national radio stations in Australia. It also won her the 2014 national Future Justice Award, awarded to Australian individuals or organisations for outstanding contribution to the advancement of economic, social, cultural and environmental concerns for the present generation, while strengthening the life chances and well-being of future generations.

Catherine received her PhD in Ethnomusicology from Griffith University in 2012. From 2009-2013, she was Research Fellow on the Australian Research Council-funded project Sustainable Futures for Music Cultures: Towards an Ecology of Musical Diversity (2009-2013), led by Griffith University. In early 2014, Catherine began a Joy Ingall Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the University of Newcastle. Her postdoctoral project, entitled "Vital signs: Assessing Music Vitality and Endangerment" (www.musicendangerment.com), assessed the sustainability of 100 music genres across the world.

In June-July 2014, following earlier preliminary fieldwork, Catherine travelled to Cambodia on an Australian Academy of the Humanities Fellowship, to further investigate cultural revitalization in post-conflict contexts. Since 2011, she has also spent 3 months in the remote Kimberley of northwest Australia, supporting the Aboriginal Miriwoong community in their cultural preservation and maintenance efforts. Through her academic and applied work, Catherine aims to benefit communities by encouraging new ways of thinking about, and taking action against, the loss of music knowledge and practices. In 2013, she led a successful crowd funding campaign to sustain a highly endangered Khmer funeral music genre. Her community-oriented work supports communities in their aims and efforts towards cultural sustainability, while her public advocacy aims to raise awareness and understanding of the consequences of the loss of cultural practices across the world.

To date, Catherine has published over 25 articles and book chapters, including articles in the International Journal of Intangible HeritageInternational Journal of Heritage Studies, Ethnomusicology Forum, as well as the entry on ‘Music Sustainability’ in Oxford Bibliographies Online. She has given over 20 conference presentations, lectures and seminars in Australia, the UK, the USA, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Indonesia, in fields including musicology, ethnomusicology, linguistics, intangible cultural heritage, and performing arts healthcare. In 2014, Catherine presented on her research at the South-East Asian symposium of the International Council for Traditional Music (Denpasar), the international conference of the Association for Critical Heritage Studies (Canberra), the Centre for Khmer Studies (Phnom Penh), the national conferences of the Australian Linguistics Society and Australian Musicological Society (Newcastle and Melbourne), and at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC – the latter an invited presentation at a working meeting on Smithsonian’s high-profile “Recovering Voices” project. 

In Australia, Catherine has coordinated and lectured courses on advanced Western music theory, history, and literature, and has managed a number of projects relating to teaching and learning music in higher education contexts.  At the University of Newcastle, in addition to her research, she presents guest lectures and seminars in undergraduate and postgraduate courses, and supervisors research higher degree students in musicology. A pianist by background, Catherine has also performed in various ensembles and was harpsichordist for the innovative chamber group Brisbane Baroque Players. She is a frequent reviewer for academic publications, and has served on the national executive committees of the Musicological Society of Australia and the Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare. 

Research Expertise
Catherine Grant is a music researcher with expertise in applied ethnomusicology, specialising in the endangerment and revitalisation of music genres of Indigenous and minority peoples. She has a growing international reputation in the field, particularly through her book 'Music Endangerment: How Language Maintenance Can Help', published in 2014 by Oxford University Press. As postdoctoral researcher at University of Newcastle, Catherine Grant is conducting the project "Assessing the vitality and endangerment of music genres: Towards a global map". The project aims to produce a sample of comparable data on the levels of vitality or endangerment of a sample of the world’s music genres. In this way, it will provide a foundation for generating verifiable claims about trends in the vitality and endangerment of music genres. This is an important step towards responding to UNESCO’s ongoing call to support cultural heritage in urgent need of safeguarding, including music. This project will be useful for communities, researchers, policy-makers, and other stakeholders in cultural sustainability: it will enable diagnosis of situations of music endangerment, and determine the urgency to implement maintenance or revitalisation initiatives. It will also indicate appropriate action to support endangered music genres, since assessing the factors causing endangerment will help establish focus and priorities for sustainability initiatives. Finally, the project will provide a knowledge base on which the efficacy of any efforts to maintain or revitalise a music genre may be later evaluated. As yet, no systematic research has been undertaken to identify and assess levels of music vitality or endangerment across the world. This project therefore also represents a significant international advance in current understanding of music sustainability.

Teaching Expertise
Catherine Grant's tertiary music teaching experience includes baroque, classical, and 19th century art music studies, to advanced music theory and 20th century music analysis. She has guest lectured on topics including ethnomusicology, music sustainability, musicians' health and wellbeing, and Western art music history. Grant has supervision experience and several years' experience as teacher and teacher-trainer of English as a Second Language. Catherine Grant's involvement with teaching and learning projects includes the role of project manager for the OLT project "Pro-active music higher research degrees" (National Teaching Fellowship of Prof Scott Harrison; 2012-2013); co-ordinator for the project "Investigating the one-to-one conservatoire teaching model" at Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University (2012-2013); and member of the reference team for an Australian Learning & Teaching Council-funded project to embed healthcare awareness within the tertiary music curriculum in Australia (2010-2011).

Administrative Expertise
Catherine Grant has a variety of university and sector administration and service expertise. She has been peer reviewer, editor and sub-editor of several academic publications, and has convened several major conferences, including the Sustainable Futures for Music Cultures international working conference (Brisbane, 2013) and the Third National Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare (Brisbane, 2009). In 2012 she was project manager for an evaluation of Opera Australia community partnerships programs in Western Sydney and Aboriginal community Yarrabah in far north Queensland, and in 2013, Mirima Language and Culture Centre (Kununurra, Western Australia) engaged Grant as consultant for a local social tourism enterprise in Keep River National Park, Northern Territory. From 2012-2013 she was project co-ordinator for the Transformative One-to-one Learning and Teaching (TOTAL) project led by Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, which investigated innovative, collaborative and transformative approaches to instrumental and vocal tuition in conservatoriums. Catherine Grant has held several executive and board roles in local and national societies and organisations, including the Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare (2008-2012), the Musicological Society of Australia (2007-2009), and Multicultural Centre for Mental Health and Wellbeing (2012-2014). In addition to her academic activities, she engages directly with Indigenous and minority communities on cultural revitalisation projects and activities, maintaining close links with the three communities with which she has worked most closely - the ca tru community of north Vietnam; the masters, teachers, and students of Khmer traditional music in Cambodia; and the Miriwoong community of the East Kimberley region of Western Australia.

Collaborations
Catherine has collaborated with researchers, organisations, and communities in the areas of music vitality and endangerment, safeguarding intangible cultural heritage, music education and performing arts healthcare. She has co-published several papers across a range of academic areas, and is currently collaborating with the non-government organisation Cambodian Living Arts on a project that gauges how cultural revitalisation activities aids poverty alleviation and economic development. In 2014 she was invited to attend and present at an international working meeting of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Griffith University
  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Music (Honours), Griffith University

Keywords

  • ethnomusicology
  • intangible cultural heritage
  • music endangerment
  • music sustainability
  • music theory
  • research methods
  • western art music
  • world music

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
190401 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Performing Arts 20
190409 Musicology and Ethnomusicology 50
210202 Heritage and Cultural Conservation 30

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 - 1/03/2014 Research Fellow Griffith University
Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre
Australia
1/01/2009 - 1/01/2012 PhD Candidate Griffith University
Queensland Conservatorium
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/01/2009 Research Assistant Griffith University
Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre
Australia

Membership

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2009 -  Membership - Cultural Survival Cultural Survival
Australia
1/01/2009 - 31/12/2009 Membership - Endangered Languages Fund Endangered Languages Fund
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Membership - International Council for Traditional Music International Council for Traditional Music
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Membership - Society for Ethnomusicology Society for Ethnomusicology
Australia
1/01/2009 -  Membership - Federation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages Federation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Membership - Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Membership - Musicological Society of Australia Musicological Society of Australia
Australia

Awards

Distinction

Year Award
2014 Future Justice Medal
Future Justice

Honours

Year Award
2014 Joy Ingall Postdoctoral Research Scholarship
University of Newcastle
2014 Travelling Fellowship
Australian Academy of the Humanities
2013 AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society
American Musicological Society, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
2012 Chancellor’s Medal for Excellence in PhD Thesis
Griffith University
2012 Graduate Award
Oxford Bibliographies Online
2009 Musicological Society of Australia postgraduate award
Musicological Society of Australia (MSA)

Research Award

Year Award
2015 Endeavour Australia Cheung Kong Research Fellowship
Australian Government
2015 Reg and Molly Buck Award
Society for Education Psychology and Music Research

Prestigious works

Year Commenced Year Finished Prestigious Work Role
2013 2013 Oxford Bibliographies Online DOI: 10.1093/obo/9780199757824-0105 Member
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Grant CF, Music Endangerment: How Language Maintenance Can Help, Oxford University Press, New York, 206 (2014) [A1]

Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2009 Grant CF, 'Letting it go: An autoethnographic account of a musician¿s loss', Musical autoethnography: Creative explorations of the self through music, Australian Academic Press, Bowen Hills, QLD 121-135 (2009)

Journal article (20 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Grant CF, 'Sounding out heritage: Cultural politics and the social practice of Quan Ho folk song in northern Vietnam.', Asian Studies Review, 1-2 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/10357823.2014.979743
2015 Grant C, 'Endangered musical heritage as a wicked problem', International Journal of Heritage Studies, 21 629-641 (2015)

The issue of the widespread decline and loss of musical heritage has recently found increasing prominence in ethnomusicological discourse, and many applied projects from grassroot... [more]

The issue of the widespread decline and loss of musical heritage has recently found increasing prominence in ethnomusicological discourse, and many applied projects from grassroots to international levels strive to support genres perceived to be under threat. Much recent literature on the subject features rhetoric that draws on metaphors from ecology, including, for example, the ideas of music ecosystems, endangerment and sustainability. Offering an alternative (though not contradictory) perspective, I here characterise the widespread loss of musical heritage as a wicked problem- one with complex interdependencies, uncertainties and conflicting stakeholder perspectives, which defies resolution more than some of the ecological metaphors arguably imply. By drawing on theoretical notions of wickedness from social policy planning and other areas, I aim to bring interdisciplinary insights to the discussion of strategies to mitigate the global threat to music as intangible cultural heritage. Offering three stories about the problem of music genres at risk and critiquing each of these stories against the theory of wicked problems, I explore the implications of this conceptualisation for heritage scholars, music researchers, policy-makers and other cultural stakeholders, in terms of moving us closer to realising effective, resilient and innovative approaches to the problem at hand.

DOI 10.1080/13527258.2014.976245
2015 Harrison S, Grant C, 'Exploring of new models of research pedagogy: time to let go of master-apprentice style supervision?', TEACHING IN HIGHER EDUCATION, 20 556-566 (2015)
DOI 10.1080/13562517.2015.1036732
2015 Carey G, Grant C, 'Teacher and student perspectives on one-to-one pedagogy: Practices and possibilities', British Journal of Music Education, 32 5-22 (2015)

This paper explores teachers' and students' perceptions of one-to-one pedagogy, in the context of tertiary vocal and instrumental tuition. Teachers and students at one Australian ... [more]

This paper explores teachers' and students' perceptions of one-to-one pedagogy, in the context of tertiary vocal and instrumental tuition. Teachers and students at one Australian conservatoire participated in interviews and focus groups that explored their experiences and perceptions on the nature, value, effectiveness and challenges of one-to-one learning and teaching. Four key themes emerged: customising teaching to the learner, the teacher-student relationship, negotiating issues of student dependency versus self-sufficiency, and situating one-to-one in a broader institutional context. Aside from an undisputed view that one-to-one is essential to students' learning and development, findings indicate diverse perceptions, including discrepancies between intentions of teachers and their pedagogical practice, and between teacher practice and student expectations. By drawing on voices 'from the inside' to characterise one-to-one practice, the study contributes to evidence-based research about learning and teaching in the conservatoire environment.

DOI 10.1017/S0265051714000084
2014 Grant C, 'Participating in arts- and cultural-sector governance in Australia: Experiences and views of people with disability', ARTS & HEALTH, 6 75-89 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/17533015.2013.826259
2014 Grant C, 'Endangered musical heritage as a wicked problem', International Journal of Heritage Studies, (2014)

The issue of the widespread decline and loss of musical heritage has recently found increasing prominence in ethnomusicological discourse, and many applied projects from grassroot... [more]

The issue of the widespread decline and loss of musical heritage has recently found increasing prominence in ethnomusicological discourse, and many applied projects from grassroots to international levels strive to support genres perceived to be under threat. Much recent literature on the subject features rhetoric that draws on metaphors from ecology, including, for example, the ideas of music ¿ecosystems¿, ¿endangerment¿ and ¿sustainability¿. Offering an alternative (though not contradictory) perspective, I here characterise the widespread loss of musical heritage as a ¿wicked problem¿¿ one with complex interdependencies, uncertainties and conflicting stakeholder perspectives, which defies resolution more than some of the ecological metaphors arguably imply. By drawing on theoretical notions of ¿wickedness¿ from social policy planning and other areas, I aim to bring interdisciplinary insights to the discussion of strategies to mitigate the global threat to music as intangible cultural heritage. Offering three ¿stories¿ about the problem of music genres ¿at risk¿ and critiquing each of these stories against the theory of wicked problems, I explore the implications of this conceptualisation for heritage scholars, music researchers, policy-makers and other cultural stakeholders, in terms of moving us closer to realising effective, resilient and innovative approaches to the problem at hand.

DOI 10.1080/13527258.2014.976245
2014 Grant CF, 'Perspectives of Culture-Bearers on the Vitality, Viability and Value of Traditional Khmer Music Genres in Contemporary Cambodia', The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 15 26-46 (2014)
DOI 10.1080/14442213.2013.866685
2014 Grant C, 'Participating in arts- and cultural-sector governance in Australia: Experiences and views of people with disability', Arts and Health, 6 75-89 (2014)

Background: This study sought the perceptions and experiences of people with disability relating to their potential or current involvement in the governance of arts and cultural o... [more]

Background: This study sought the perceptions and experiences of people with disability relating to their potential or current involvement in the governance of arts and cultural organisations in Australia. Methods: A total of 32 people participated in an online survey, and results were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: The findings revealed that those participants who had been involved in governance benefited from it in terms of self-esteem, participation in society and well-being. The results also indicated possible ways to encourage and enable more people with disability to become involved in governance roles, for example through the development of training and resources. Conclusions: This research represents a basis for future larger-scale studies relating to governance development for people with disability. Recommendations are made for future directions in both practice and research. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

DOI 10.1080/17533015.2013.826259
2014 Carey G, Grant C, 'Teacher and student perspectives on one-to-one pedagogy: practices and possibilities', British Journal of Music Education, (2014)

This paper explores teachers' and students' perceptions of one-to-one pedagogy, in the context of tertiary vocal and instrumental tuition. Teachers and students at one Australian ... [more]

This paper explores teachers' and students' perceptions of one-to-one pedagogy, in the context of tertiary vocal and instrumental tuition. Teachers and students at one Australian conservatoire participated in interviews and focus groups that explored their experiences and perceptions on the nature, value, effectiveness and challenges of one-to-one learning and teaching. Four key themes emerged: customising teaching to the learner, the teacher-student relationship, negotiating issues of student dependency versus self-sufficiency, and situating one-to-one in a broader institutional context. Aside from an undisputed view that one-to-one is essential to students' learning and development, findings indicate diverse perceptions, including discrepancies between intentions of teachers and their pedagogical practice, and between teacher practice and student expectations. By drawing on voices 'from the inside' to characterise one-to-one practice, the study contributes to evidence-based research about learning and teaching in the conservatoire environment. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014.

DOI 10.1017/S0265051714000084
2013 Grant CF, 'First inversion: A rationale for implementing the "flipped approach" in tertiary music courses.', Australian Journal of Music Education, 2013 3-12 (2013) [C1]
2013 Carey G, Grant C, McWilliam E, Taylor P, 'One-to-one pedagogy: Developing a protocol for illuminating the nature of teaching in the conservatoire', International Journal of Music Education, 31 148-159 (2013)

This article outlines the approach used to develop a scheme to characterize the nature and quality of specific practices of one-to-one teaching, selected on the basis of their pot... [more]

This article outlines the approach used to develop a scheme to characterize the nature and quality of specific practices of one-to-one teaching, selected on the basis of their potential significance to the development of student performance. Although the value of one-to-one teaching remains largely unchallenged at the conservatoire level, music institutions are increasingly being called to justify the need for such a cost- and resource-intensive pedagogical approach. Funding pressures combined with a lack of systematic investigation into the value and efficacy of one-to-one teaching underscore the urgent need for a rigorous, evidenced-based way to characterize related pedagogical practices. This article documents the processes of developing one such approach at an Australian conservatoire. The authors hope to encourage and facilitate the implementation of similar projects elsewhere, and thereby help lay the foundation for a systematic and credible international understanding of the value and limitations of one-to-one learning and teaching practices in the conservatoire environment. © 2013 The Author(s).

DOI 10.1177/0255761413483077
Citations Scopus - 2
2013 Bendrups D, Barney K, Grant C, 'An Introduction to Sustainability and Ethnomusicology in the Australasian Context', Musicology Australia, 35 153-158 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1080/08145857.2013.844470
2013 Grant CF, 'Drums on the Red River [DVD Review].', The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology, 14 293-294 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1080/14442213.2013.787907
2013 Carey GM, Bridgstock R, Taylor P, McWilliam E, Grant C, 'Characterising one-to-one conservatoire teaching: some implications of a quantitative analysis', MUSIC EDUCATION RESEARCH, 15 357-368 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/14613808.2013.824954
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2013 Grant C, 'Developing a triage system to determine approaches to sustaining intangible cultural heritage', International Journal of Social Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context, 9 11-22 (2013)

High-profile agencies such as UNESCO continue to underscore the urgent need to support the sustainability of intangible cultural heritage across the world, in all its forms: from ... [more]

High-profile agencies such as UNESCO continue to underscore the urgent need to support the sustainability of intangible cultural heritage across the world, in all its forms: from languages to music, theatre to dance. That task is enormous, and within any specific region or nation, even within a community, decisions often need to be made about where to best direct the limited funding, time, and resources for sustainability efforts. Drawing on precedent from the environmental sciences, this paper suggests a 'triage system' to help set priorities for implementing sustainability initiatives. The tripartite model assesses (1) the nature and severity of the threat to the cultural expression in question, (2) its perceived value in the community, and (3) the solvability of the problem. The system holds potential to assist stakeholders - communities themselves, as well as bodies that allocate funding and resources for cultural maintenance and revitalisation - to determine priorities for support, in turn leading to better deployment of resources and optimal outcomes for effort. © Common Ground, Catherine Grant, All Rights Reserved.

2013 Grant CF, 'Developing a triage system for sustaining intangible cultural heritage', The International Journal of Social Sustainability in Economic, Social and Cultural Context, 9 11-22 (2013) [C1]
2012 Grant C, 'Rethinking Safeguarding: Objections and Responses to Protecting and Promoting Endangered Musical Heritage', Ethnomusicology Forum, 21 31-51 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/17411912.2012.641733
2012 Grant C, 'Analogies and links between cultural and biological diversity', Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, 2 153-163 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/20441261211273644
2011 Grant C, 'Key factors in the sustainability of languages and music: A comparative study', Musicology Australia, 33 95-113 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1080/08145857.2011.576648
Citations Scopus - 2
2010 Grant CF, 'The links between safeguarding language and safeguarding musical heritage', International Journal of Intangible Heritage, 5 45-59 (2010) [C1]
Show 17 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Grant CF, 'Music Sustainability (2013) [D2]
DOI 10.1093/obo/9780199757824-0105

Conference (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Carey G, Grant CF, 'Teachers of instruments, or teachers as instruments? Moving from transfer to transformative approaches to one-to-one pedagogy', Proceedings of 20th International Seminar of CEPROM, Minas Gerais, Brazil (2014) [E1]
2014 Matthias PV, Whaleboat T, Grant C, 'Sacred songs from the Torres Strait Islands', Charisima of Dissonance, Melbourne University (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Philip Matthias

Report (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2013 Grant CF, 'Garn-ngooning Tours: Enterprise Plan', Mirima Dawang Woorlab-gerring, 43 (2013)
2012 Harrison S, Bartleet B-L, Bendrups D, Grant CF, 'Opera Australia Community Projects Evaluation Report', Opera Australia, 38 (2012)
2012 Grant CF, 'Governance Development for Cultural Practitioners, Artists and Arts Administrators with Disability or who are Deaf', Arts Access Australia (2012)
2008 Flenady L, Flenady T, McPherson S, Grant CF, 'Change and sustainability in ethnomusicological publications: An overview 1983-2008.', Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre (2008)
Show 1 more report
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 15
Total funding $203,525

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20155 grants / $64,600

Endeavour Australia Cheung Kong Research Fellowship$24,500

Sustaining and revitalising intangible cultural heritage can contribute to poverty reduction and economic development (Letts 2006). In Cambodia, high poverty rates contribute to a situation where the basic needs of 46% of the population are still unmet (UNDESA 2012). Since the destructive political and socioeconomic circumstances in the 1970s and 1980s, there have been considerable ongoing community and governmental efforts to revitalise traditional Cambodian music. These initiatives have potential to alleviate poverty, as well as holding other social and cultural benefits. Through a case study approach, the project determines the extent to which cultural (specifically music) revitalisation initiatives may: 1) generate income and employment; 2) broaden career capacities and opportunities, particularly of youth and vulnerable or disadvantaged groups; and 3) provide tools to individuals and communities to fight against poverty, for example through the development of transferrable skills, or by stimulating entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation.

Funding body: ACT Department of Education and Training

Funding body ACT Department of Education and Training
Project Team
Scheme Endeavour Australia Cheung Kong Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Developing social awareness and engagement through the creative arts$19,800

The University of Newcastle’s School of Creative Arts (SCA) will coordinate a 3-week volunteer placement in Cambodia during June-July 2015. The project objective is to provide 6 Bachelor-level SCA students with an opportunity to become Asia-literate and gain a first-hand experience of Cambodia. Students will participate in practice-, research-, and/or service-based projects that align with the mission and vision of non-government partner organisations Music Arts School, Empowering Youth Cambodia, and Cambodian Living Arts. Students will learn the Khmer language and be recognised for academic credit. Prior to departure the students will attend information sessions that discuss expectations, assessment, and support. The anticipated project outcome is that students will gain valuable insight into how the creative arts may be leveraged for social improvement in a developing country. This Project meets the objectives of the New Colombo Plan by encouraging interest and engagement with Asia and cultivating enduring collaboration and cooperation with Cambodia.

Funding body: Department of Education

Funding body Department of Education
Project Team
Scheme New Colombo Plan
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Torres Strait Islander sacred music: protection, cultivation and revitalisation$15,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Philip Matthias, Doctor Jocelyn McKinnon, Doctor Catherine Grant
Scheme Strategic Networks Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500900
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Reg and Molly Buck award$3,800

Funding body: Society for Education Psychology and Music Research

Funding body Society for Education Psychology and Music Research
Project Team
Scheme Reg and Molly Buck award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Healthy Practices for Performing Arts$1,500

This grant allows establishment of a health and wellbeing initiative for students and community members in the Hunter region, in relation to their practice as performing artists.

Funding body: Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare

Funding body Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare
Project Team
Scheme Healthy Practices for Performing Arts
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20142 grants / $63,800

Joy Ingall Postdoctoral Scholarship$60,000

The aim of this project is to produce a sample of comparable data on the levels of vitality or endangerment of over 100 of the world’s music genres. In this way, it will provide a foundation for generating verifiable claims about trends in the vitality and endangerment of music genres, a crucial first step towards responding to UNESCO’s ongoing call to support cultural heritage in urgent need of safeguarding, including music. This project will be useful for communities, researchers, policy-makers, and other stakeholders in cultural sustainability, in a number of ways. First, the project will enable diagnosis of situations of music endangerment, and determine the urgency to implement maintenance or revitalisation initiatives. Second, it will help indicate appropriate action to support endangered music genres, since assessing the factors causing endangerment will help establish focus and priorities for sustainability initiatives. Third, it will provide a knowledge base on which the efficacy of any efforts to maintain or revitalise a music genre may be subsequently evaluated. As yet, no systematic research has been undertaken to identify and assess levels of music vitality or endangerment across the world. This project therefore also represents a significant international advance in current understanding of music sustainability.

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Travelling Fellowship of the Australian Academy of the Humanities$3,800

The Travelling Fellowship supports early-career researchers working in the humanities to undertake research overseas.

Funding body: Australian Academy of the Humanities

Funding body Australian Academy of the Humanities
Project Team
Scheme Travelling Fellowship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

20131 grants / $800

AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society$800

Publication subvention for costs associated with the book 'Music Endangerment: How Language Maintenance Can Help'

Funding body: American Musicological Society

Funding body American Musicological Society
Project Team
Scheme AMS 75 PAYS Endowment of the American Musicological Society
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

20121 grants / $3,025

Arts Queensland Career Development Grant$3,025

Funding body: Arts Queensland

Funding body Arts Queensland
Project Team
Scheme Career Development Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20111 grants / $300

Musicological Society of Australia Conference Travel Grant$300

Funding body: Musicological Society of Australia

Funding body Musicological Society of Australia
Project Team
Scheme Student Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20101 grants / $2,200

Griffith Graduate Research School International Travel Grant$2,200

Travel grant to present at International Council of Traditional Music symposium in Hanoi, Vietnam

Funding body: Griffith Graduate Research School (Australia)

Funding body Griffith Graduate Research School (Australia)
Project Team
Scheme International Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20094 grants / $68,800

Griffith University Postgraduate Research Scholarship$66,000

Scholarship to undertake doctoral studies

Funding body: Griffith University

Funding body Griffith University
Project Team
Scheme Postgraduate Research Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON Y

SEMPRE Travelling Scholarship$2,000

Travel grant to present at Guildhall School of Music and Drama’s Reflective Conservatoire conference, London, 2009

Funding body: Society for Education Psychology and Music Research

Funding body Society for Education Psychology and Music Research
Project Team
Scheme Travelling Scholarship
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Musicological Society of Australia (MSA) Student Award$500

Funding body: Musicological Society of Australia

Funding body Musicological Society of Australia
Project Team
Scheme Student Award
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

Musicological Society of Australia Conference Travel Grant$300

Funding body: Musicological Society of Australia

Funding body Musicological Society of Australia
Project Team
Scheme Student Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed2
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.6

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 PhD The Role of Digital Technology in Folk Music
Music, Faculty of Education and Arts, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2013 Honours An ethnographic study of pedagogical focus in healthy posture for young flutists
Music, Griffith University
Principal Supervisor
2013 Honours Beyond the veil: Women, orientalism, and exoticism in nineteenth-century French opera
Music, Griffith University
Principal Supervisor
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News

UON Researcher Wins Student Grants for 3-Week Cambodia Study Trip in 2015

November 28, 2014

The University of Newcastle's Dr Catherine Grant has been awarded funding for 6 undergraduate students to go to Cambodia on a graded volunteer placement program in 2015.

2014 Future Justice Prize

UON Music Lecturer and Researcher Wins Future Justice Prize 2014

November 13, 2014

The University of Newcastle's Dr Catherine Grant has been awarded the 2014 Future Justice Medal 'for future justice leadership and initiative in early career' for her work on endangered music.

Catherine Grant awarded Endeavour Fellowship

UON endangered music researcher awarded Endeavour Fellowship

November 13, 2014

Dr Catherine Grant, a researcher in the School of Creative Arts at the University of Newcastle (UON), has been awarded an Endeavour Fellowship to continue her work on endangered musical traditions in Cambodia.

Dr Catherine Grant

UON researcher collaborates with Smithsonian

September 22, 2014

The University of Newcastle's (UON) Dr Catherine Grant collaborates with the Smithsonian Institution, US, on the revitalisation of cultural heritage.

The Conversation

The Brisbane Declaration: a blueprint for the musical world

August 12, 2014

By Dr Catherine Grant, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle

Earlier this year the number of views of South Korean mega-star Psy's Gangnam Style YouTube video exceeded two billion. That's more than a quarter of the people on the planet who have watched the video. It also adds up to a collective 16,000 years spent watching (assuming everyone sat out the four-and-a-bit minutes, which is a big assumption).

Dr Catherine Grant awarded humanities research fellowship

Culture crisis

May 12, 2014

 After a successful feature article on The Conversation, University of Newcastle researcher, Dr Catherine Grant, is heading to Cambodia to research three endangered Khmer musical traditions.

Dr Catherine Grant

Position

Research Academic
School of Creative Arts
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Music

Contact Details

Email catherine.grant@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5838
Link UoN Blogs

Office

Room UH114
Building University House
Location City Campus

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