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Dr Bonnie McBain

Conjoint Fellow

School of Environmental and Life Sciences (Geography and Environmental Studies)

Bonnie McBain: SUSTAINABILITY, SCIENCE, AND SYSTEMS

Dr Bonnie McBain is advocating for a more holistic approach to examining change resistant issues, building community, and modeling solutions.

Dr Bonnie McBain

A sessional academic and Conjoint Fellow in UON’s School of Environmental and Life Sciences, Bonnie is at the international forefront of the emerging field of Sustainability Science.

Bonnie’s work aims to build solutions that increase the resilience of communities and the natural environment they rely upon for their welfare.

With multidisciplinary environmental science based expertise in Ecological Footprints, climate change, surface water quality, catchment management, sustainable forest management, air quality, groundwater and fisheries management, Bonnie has become particularly interested in work that goes beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Bonnie believes that the interconnected nature of the big issues we face as a society makes it dangerous to address them from only one perspective, or through the lens of a single discipline.

“Only through combining varied experience and knowledge can we reframe issues and find new solutions. We need to transcend traditional disciplinary constraints.”

A much-awarded educator, Bonnie coordinates and teaches four online courses annually, including a new non-disciplinary program she developed on Unraveling Complexity.

At the end of 2015, Bonnie was awarded a prestigious Vice-Chancellor's Sessional Staff Teaching Excellence Award. In 2016, it was an Australian Award for University Teaching Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning from the Office of Learning and Teaching.

MODELING OUTCOMES

Bonnie has received funding and a Fellowship from the ARC to lead research into our Ecological Footprint.

“It was the first time that anyone had modeled future global ecological footprints, specifically to inform policy development in Australia,” Bonnie says.

Using scenarios, Bonnie and her team were able to model different possibilities and outcomes, into the future up until 2070.

“We looked at the critical, underlying issues facing environmental policy in Australia, such as transport policy, renewable electricity, architecture, and urban design, and worked out ways to support policy makers to think differently about how they make decisions in highly uncertain times.”

A continuation of that collaboration has seen Bonnie most recently involved in research regarding the feasibility of a 100 per cent renewable energy sector in Australia.

“The evidence is growing,” says Bonnie. “There are now a number of studies in Australia that indicate that a hundred percent renewable energy with current technology is possible.”

TEACHING SKILLS NOT JUST CONTENT

Innovative student-led learning that empowers students to continue their own life-long learning is of great importance to Bonnie.

Together with colleague Liam Phelan, Bonnie recently co-led a project to develop learning standards for the field of environment and sustainability in collaboration with academics, employers, Aboriginal peoples, students and environmental educators from other sectors from all around Australia.

“We now have an understanding of the essential learning required of all students graduating from an environment and sustainability degree anywhere in Australia.”

In 2016 Bonnie was asked to develop and teach a new non disciplinary course on Unraveling Complexity.

“Because this is an emerging policy field, what our students are learning is actually exceeding the capacity of many in the industry sector.”

To better equip them for the challenges involved in facilitating major change, Bonnie challenges her students to reconsider the way they communicate information.

‘Communicating sustainability information is one of the most critical skills a sustainability scientist can have. We all need to learn how to do this better.’

The results created by her students are inspired and have included Pecha Kucha presentations, children’s stories, TED talks and YouTube videos.

“We need creative minds to become more sustainable. Thinking outside their own square is what we try to foster in our students.”

MANAGING DIFFERENCE

Bonnie admits that the mental paradigm shift necessary to unravel and amend big issues is a challenge for anyone.

“I think the underlying thing about sustainability, is not to tell people how to think about things,” Bonnie says.

“It is about opening up everyone’s ability to critically reflect on what's happening, but most importantly, it is about empowering people to take part in change.”

Bonnie argues that systems thinking is needed to understand and address the complex interrelated environmental, social, and economic components of any change resistant issue and what to do about it.

“I believe that to have any real impact on policy resistant issues, diverse transdisciplinary teams must work together, sharing different perspectives and broadening understandings.”

“Different groups of people will understand a problem differently. None of us has the whole picture or all the answers – solutions must be preceded by sharing different knowledge, listening and being open to new possibilities.”

“But to have a hope of addressing complex issues, you have to bring differences and conflicts together, and manage that constructively,” Bonnie reflects.

BUILDING CAPACITY

“I see my role as preparing information and developing skills to enable people to plan strategically to make their own safe future.”

Moving into the future, Bonnie is looking to further merge her research and teaching, with a focus on bottom-up change, by empowering community to increase participation in decision-making.

”When the community has the information, and community will is there, change can happen.”

Surely, the close examination of tipping points, unsustainable ecological footprints and short sighted policy must sometimes become overwhelming?

“Ever since I could remember I knew my dream job would involve ‘saving the planet’,” says Bonnie.

“In my work I feel a sense of hope, purpose and inspiration about what I do and the reason I do it. In many ways, I feel like we are currently in a very hopeful time. A more sustainable future is becoming economically, socially and environmentally desirable. We must take advantage of these windows of opportunity when they come.”

Bonnie McBain: SUSTAINABILITY, SCIENCE, AND SYSTEMS

Dr Bonnie McBain is advocating for a more holistic approach to examining change resistant issues, building community, and modeling solutions

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Career Summary

Biography

What inspires me professionally and personally is the search for solutions to persistent environmental problems.

I have a multidisciplinary environmental background (Ecological Footprints, climate change, surface water quality, catchment management, sustainable forest management) but am particularly interested in transdisciplinarity - work that goes beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries.

My work aims to build solutions which increase the resilience of communities and the natural environment they rely upon for their welfare. My research, teaching and professional practice explicitly uses holistic/systems thinking to address the limitations of current environmental management.

I have a background in the development of sustainability policy especially for persistent, complex issues. I am interested in approaches which allow decision makers to make robust and defensible policy choices given the likelihood that future uncertainty will increase.

My expertise in strategic planning for an uncertain future includes

  • scenario and futures analysis,
  • environmental modelling,
  • robust policy development,
  • collaborative learning & participatory decision making
  • mechanisms for adaptive management and
  • the explicit consideration of alternate explanations, values and perspectives.

Although I research Ecological Footprints (the demand we have on Earth’s resources), what I am really interested in is  the growth of our collective Ecological Handprint (the positive impact we can have on the planet).

Teaching Expertise

I seek to empower my students to take an active part in the future of their communities, workplaces and family. My students have taken this challenge up in so many different ways:

  • Nelson Burand-Hicks now works as a Sustainability Officer with council and is also passionate about sea life in his local area.
  • Aaren Drunis is the Founder and Managing Director of Sydney Sustainable Living and won 2015 AAEE NSW Environmental Educator of the Year  - Community Educator of the Year.

More knowledge has not lead to improved environmental practices. Environmental education is about doing, and in that process of participating we come to understand more, care more and want to do more:

  1. Learner-centred teaching – from my perspective it’s about learning not teaching. This slightly different perspective is subtle but critical. Basically this means that students will be explicitly practicing and implementing the theory that they learn through case studies and practical, vocationally relevant assessment tasks. Students are guided and supported throughout the course in achieving the learning but because I set up a collaborative learning environment, students and lecturer together can all support each other in this learning.
  2. Critically reflective thinking – new university graduates are often criticized for not having the relevant practical skills required in the workforce to contribute autonomous expertise. In my courses I specifically address the critical thinking skills that you will need. Assessments are deliberately set in such a way that they will require students to reflect on their own assumptions, question them and consider the views of other that may differ from their own worldviews.
  3. Collaborative learning – we all come to learning with different experiences, backgrounds and worldviews. As my courses progress, students have the chance to realise that diversity is what gives collaborative learning its strengths.  I encourage students to be courageous enough to be open to views they disagree with and to question their own assumptions to get the most out of the courses I teach. Working together to help one another in the learning process provides a mutual benefit to all involved in learning – students and lecturers. It also replicates what occurs in the workforce.
  4. Participatory Learning – you won't come to one of my courses to hear lectures, take notes and then repeat what I have said to get high marks. Environmental education which is based on accumulating and sharing new knowledge has not lead to society doing things differently. What if we flipped that around? What if, in doing environmental work, we become more knowledgeable about sustainability? That's the premise of my teaching. To engage students in participation right from the moment they join a course. 
  5. Experiential learning - in my courses students learn theories of practice but ultimately are always required to use what they have learnt in real world applications. This ensures that students can demonstrate knowledge and practical skills which are much needed in the workforce and our communities. Our learning experience is  focused on doing, not one of watching.
  6. Place-based learning - my students are encouraged to apply their learning to places that are meaningful to them or allow them to contribute to a particular community requiring their skills. This is important for engaged learning because students can learn how to make very real and relevant contributions to issues that are important for them.



Research Expertise

Key research skills and expertise:

  1. Dynamic Modelling: My modelling repertoire not only includes that of modelling future Ecological Footprints but also other factors relevant to environmental management and sustainability such as climate change, land use demand, land degradation, biodiversity, surface water nutrient pollution sources and sources of diffuse air emissions.
  2. Resilience Thinking: My work aims to build solutions which increase the resilience of communities and the natural environment they rely upon for their welfare. A shift away from linear thinking and the assumptions behind incremental, controllable change are needed to make environmental governance appropriate to modern environmental challenges. We must also consider the affects of multiple scales (time and space), multiple worldview and contested interests.
  3. Climate change: my current research involves the modelling climate change for the development of scenarios to mitigate future dangerous climate change. Although incredibly complex, I aim to condense and communicate the core understanding needed for responsible decision making.
  4. Complexity theory and systems thinking: The increasing complexity of environmental management requires best practice approaches including transdisciplinary approaches, social learning, wholistic thinking, adaptive and flexible management and regional solutions etc.
  5. Uncertainty and futures analysis: There is much evidence that the uncertainty surrounding environmental decision making has resulted in a postponement of decisions that, in reality, are required very urgently. My expertise for strategic planning for uncertain environmental management includes scenario development, continual and iterative collaborative learning that adapts to new knowledge over time, incorporation of mechanisms for adaptive management and the explicit consideration of alternate explanations, values and perspectives.
  6. Collaborative community engagement: Participatory decision making accounts for societal values and choices relating to management are highly divergent and contested issues. It is important that environmental policy is developed in collaboration with relevant stakeholders so that 1) different perspectives and worldviews can add value and allow the incorporation of critical uncertainties 2) different stakeholders can have ownership of decisions 3) different stakeholders can take part in a process of social learning to develop a shared understanding and 4) policy tradeoffs and benefits can be negotiated.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of Tasmania
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (Environmental Science, Charles Sturt University
  • Bachelor of Applied Science (Environment Sc)(Hons), Charles Sturt University

Keywords

  • complexity
  • environmental indicators
  • environmental management
  • environmental policy
  • futures analysis
  • learning for sustainability
  • modelling
  • participatory decision making
  • resilience thinking
  • systems thinking
  • uncertainty analysis

Languages

  • German (Fluent)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified 40
120504 Land Use and Environmental Planning 30
050203 Environmental Education and Extension 30

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Web Learn Tutor Env & Life Sciences University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2011 - 1/06/2013 Catchment Action Plan Development Officer Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Management Authority
School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (UoNS)
Australia
1/06/2007 - 1/01/2011 Fellowship - APDI

ARC - Linkage -

Projects (including Australian Postdoctoral (Industry) Fellowships)

University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia
1/01/2007 - 1/01/2012 Research Fellow University of Newcastle
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Australia

Awards

Award

Year Award
2015 Australasian Green Gown Award - Learning, Teaching & Skills
ACTS Inc - Australasian Campuses Towards Sustainability

Teaching Award

Year Award
2016 Australian Award for University Teaching Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
Office of Learning and Teaching
2015 Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Sessional Staff Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning
University of Newcastle
2015 Faculty of Science and IT Sessional Teaching Excellence and Contribution to Student Learning
Faculty of Science and Information Technology
2013 Sessional Academic of the Year
University of Newcastle
2013 Online Teacher of the Year Award
University of Newcastle

Invitations

Distinguished Visitor

Year Title / Rationale
2008 The Centre for Business Relationships Accountability, Sustainability & Society (BRASS)
Organisation: University of Cardiff

Speaker

Year Title / Rationale
2011 Forests NSW Research Seminar Series
Organisation: Forest Corp
2009 Centre for Urban & Regional Studies
Organisation: University of Newcastle
2008 Stockholm Environment Institute
Organisation: University of York
2008 Hunter Transport & Logistics Forum
Organisation: Hunter Transport & Logistics
2008 Expert Group Meeting on Sustainability of Economic Growth, Resource Efficiency and Resilience
Organisation: United Nations Economic & Social Commission for the Asia Pacific

Teaching

Code Course Role Duration
ENVS6530 Environmental Management
Faculty of Science and IT, University of Newcastle
The course focuses on the theory, philosophy and practice of environmental management using complexity theory to investigate current limitations in environmental management. Differing best practice approaches to environmental management are examined along with case studies, professional practice and various management tools. Problem solving approaches are taken in respect of environmental management applications and plans. The context of environmental management practice, especially in relation to sustainability and climate change, is also explored.
Course Coordinator 13/12/2016 - 13/01/2017
PGST6004 Unraveling Complexity
The University of Newcastle, NSW
Complex problems are characterised by interconnectedness, unpredictability and uncertainty and have the potential to continually change and evolve. In this course you will gain an understanding of complexity and learn how to address complex problems such as climate change, population health, global financial stability and maintaining robust democracies.
Course Coordinator 13/12/2016 - 13/01/2017
ENVS6535 Implementing Environmental Resilience and Addressing Complexity
The University of Newcastle
Traditional approaches to environmental management assume social-ecological systems (SESs) can be managed or controlled optimally and respond linearly and predictably. Yet this approach has repeatedly resulted in persistent environmental policy failure and/or resource management failure because the importance of maintaining overall system resilience has not been recognised. Resilience thinking and environmental complexity are theories which can inform better environmental management but are not commonly utilised in practice. The application of these theoretical approaches is a new and emerging field, both in Australia and internationally. This course will build students expertise so that they are able to apply resilience thinking and complexity theory through a simulated work place setting. It will give students the skills which are topical, relevant and in-demand in the Australian and international workforce. Students will be supported to learn how to apply new skills to a system case study.
Course Coordinator 7/10/2014 - 7/11/2015
ENVS6525 Sustainability and Ecosystem Health
The University of Newcastle
Sustainability and Ecosystem Health offers a systematic examination of an emergent paradigm in environmental management, ecosystem health and resilience thinking. It explores these concepts via the theoretical perspectives and methodologies of complexity and transdisciplinarity. The ecosystem health paradigm examines environmental issues using key indicators of system health such as integrity, resilience, vigor, diversity, stability and adaptability. Major environmental issues are analysed from a complex adaptive systems perspective with humans and their institutions seen as integral parts of socio-ecological systems, i.e. a 'humans in the ecosystem' approach. The Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia provides a rich setting for case studies at the regional level. Other case studies are explored, including human induced climate change and global warming at the biosphere scale. Links between complex adaptive socio-ecological systems at varied scales are also explored. All case studies are used to highlight interdependencies and opportunities for diagnosing, maintaining or restoring ecosystem and human health and resilience.
Course Coordinator 7/10/2012 - 7/11/2015
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 McBain B, Phelan L, 'Building students¿ communication skills and understanding of environmental and sustainability issues interactively and cumulatively with Pecha Kucha presentations', Learner-Centered Teaching Activities for Environmental and Sustainability Studies, Springer International, Cham, Switzerland 279-284 (2016) [B1]
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-28543-6_38
Co-authors Liam Phelan

Journal article (17 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Lenzen M, McBain B, Trainer T, Jütte S, Rey-Lescure O, Huang J, 'Simulating low-carbon electricity supply for Australia', Applied Energy, 179 553-564 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Elsevier LtdWe offer a simulation of low-carbon electricity supply for Australia, based on currently and economically operating technologies and proven resources, contribu... [more]

© 2016 Elsevier LtdWe offer a simulation of low-carbon electricity supply for Australia, based on currently and economically operating technologies and proven resources, contributing new knowledge by: featuring a GIS-based spatial optimisation process for identifying suitable generator locations; including expanded transmission networks; covering the entire continent; and investigating the significance of biofuel availability and carbon price. We find that nation-wide low-carbon electricity supply is possible at about 160¿GW installed capacity, at indicative cost of around 20¿¢/kWh, involving wind, concentrating solar, and PV utilities, and less than 20¿TWh of biofuelled generation. Dispatchable hydro and biofuel plants are required to plug gaps caused by occasional low-resource periods. Technology and cost breakthroughs for storage, geothermal, and ocean technologies, as well as offshore wind deployment would substantially alter our assessment.

DOI 10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.06.151
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
2016 Harris KM, Phelan L, McBain B, Archer J, Drew AJ, James C, 'Attitudes toward learning oral communication skills online: the importance of intrinsic interest and student-instructor differences', Educational Technology Research and Development, 64 591-609 (2016) [C1]

© 2016, Association for Educational Communications and Technology.This study examined and compared attitudes of both students and instructors, motivated by an interest in improvi... [more]

© 2016, Association for Educational Communications and Technology.This study examined and compared attitudes of both students and instructors, motivated by an interest in improving the development and delivery of online oral communication learning (OOCL). Few studies have compared student and instructor attitudes toward learning technologies, and no known studies have conducted item response theory (IRT) analyses on these factors. Two independent and anonymous surveys resulted in 255 participants (124 university students, and 131 instructors). Exploratory factor analyses produced final item sets and a two-factor model for student attitudes (Technology Self-efficacy [TSE], and Positive Attitudes [PA]), and a three-factor model for instructors (TSE, Behavioral Intentions, and PA). The OOCL attitude factors showed strong validity through both IRT and classical test theory analyses. Comparisons between students and instructors showed students generally had higher TSE and more positive attitudes towards OOCL. The attitudes most relevant to OOCL were intrinsic interest, behavioral intentions, and perceived usefulness of the technology. This study revealed that technological self-efficacy may be useful for differentiating students and instructors, but not for assessing OOCL attitudes. Further development in this field could focus on the improvement of instructors¿ attitudes and skills, as well as exploring the role of intrinsic interest.

DOI 10.1007/s11423-016-9435-8
Co-authors Jennifer Archer, Carole James, Liam Phelan, Antony Drew
2016 Mcbain B, 'The Ecological Footprint - new developments in policy and practice', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS, 60 E19-E20 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/1467-8489.12170
2016 McBain B, Drew A, James C, Phelan L, Harris K, Archer J, 'Student Experience of Oral Communication Assessment Tasks Online from a Multi-disciplinary Trial', Education + Training, 58 134-149 (2016) [C1]
DOI 10.1108/ET-10-2014-0124
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Carole James, Antony Drew, Liam Phelan, Jennifer Archer
2012 Lenzen M, McBain V, 'Using tensor calculus for scenario modelling', Environmental Modelling and Software, 37 41-54 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2006 Baker S, Lauck B, 'Association of common brown froglets, Crinia signifera, with clearcut forest edges in Tasmania, Australia', WILDLIFE RESEARCH, 33 29-34 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/WR04120
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2006 Lauck B, 'Fluctuating asymmetry of the frog Crinia signifera in response to logging', WILDLIFE RESEARCH, 33 313-320 (2006) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/WR04107
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 9
2005 Lauck B, 'Life history of the frog Crinia signifera in Tasmania, Australia', AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 53 21-27 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1071/ZO04028
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 8
2005 Lauck B, Swain R, Barmuta L, 'Breeding site characteristics regulating life history traits of the brown tree frog, Litoria ewingii', HYDROBIOLOGIA, 537 135-146 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10750-004-2790-1
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2005 Lauck B, 'Life-history studies and the impact of recent forest harvesting on two frog species, Crinia signifera and Litoria ewingii', Tasforests, 16 83-93 (2005) [C1]
2005 Lauck B, Swain R, Bashford R, 'The response of the frog Crinia signifera to different silvicultural practices in southern Tasmania, Australia', Tasforests, 17 29-36 (2005) [C1]
2005 Lauck B, 'The impact of recent logging and pond isolation on pond colonization by the frog Crinia signifera', Pacific Conservation Biology, 11 50-56 (2005) [C1]

A colonization experiment was used to investigate landscape use of a commercially managed wet forest in southern Tasmania by the ground-dwelling frog, Crinia signifera. Replicated... [more]

A colonization experiment was used to investigate landscape use of a commercially managed wet forest in southern Tasmania by the ground-dwelling frog, Crinia signifera. Replicated artificial ponds were placed at increasing distances (20, 100, 250 and 500 m) from nine permanent breeding sites to investigate the effect of pond isolation on colonization. Four of these permanent breeding sites were surrounded by coupes that had been logged within the previous five years and five permanent breeding sites were surrounded by unlogged forest to investigate the effect of recent logging on colonization. The rate of colonization, the frequency of colonization, male size and female size (inferred from clutch size) were monitored over two breeding seasons. No pond isolation effects were found, indicating that C. signifera is randomly distributed throughout the forest landscape for up to 500 m around each permanent breeding site. Such patterns of forest habitat use indicate that management prescriptions should not only take into account the habitat characteristics of breeding sites but should also consider the surrounding terrestrial landscape. Ponds surrounded by unlogged forest were colonized almost two times faster than ponds surrounded by logged forest indicating that landscape modification can significantly alter amphibian mobility. These findings have consequences for total reproductive output especially in landscapes where breeding sites are highly variable and for species that are slow to colonize new breeding sites.

Citations Scopus - 6
2005 Lauck B, 'Can life history studies contribute to understanding the impacts of clearfell logging on pond breeding anurans? A review', Applied Herpetology, 2 125-137 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1163/1570754043492045
2005 Lauck B, Swain R, Barmuta L, 'Impacts of shading on larval traits of the frog Litoria ewingii in a commercial forest, Tasmania, Australia', JOURNAL OF HERPETOLOGY, 39 478-486 (2005) [C1]
DOI 10.1670/52-04A.1
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
2005 Lauck B, Swain R, Bashford R, 'Seasonal activity patterns of the frog, Crinia signifera (Anura: myobatrachidae), in Southern Tasmania, Australia', Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania Hobart, 139 29-32 (2005) [C1]
2004 Lauck B, 'Using aquatic funnel traps to determine relative density of amphibian larvae: Factors influencing trapping', Herpetological Review, 35 248-250 (2004)
Citations Scopus - 5
1999 Lauck B, Tyler MJ, 'Ilial shaft curvature: A novel osteological feature distinguishing two closely related species of Australian frogs', TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA, 123 151-152 (1999)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Show 14 more journal articles

Report (13 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 McBain V, Phelan L, Brown P, Brown VA, Hay I, Horsfield R, et al., 'Learning and Teaching Academic Standards Statement for Environment and Sustainability', Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching, 32 (2015) [R1]
Co-authors Liam Phelan
2014 Phelan L, Drew A, McBain V, Archer J, burns T, harris K, et al., 'Teaching and assessing oral communication skills online: Gauging interest and trialling diverse approaches across the University of Newcastle', University of Newcastle (2014)
Co-authors Antony Drew, Bronwyn Hemsley, Jennifer Archer, Carole James, Liam Phelan
2013 McBain B, Glasby A, Thompson J, 'Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Action Plan 2013-2023: supporting information', Hunter-Central Rivers CMA, 300 (2013) [R1]
2013 McBain B, Glasby A, Thompson J, 'Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Action Plan 2013-2023', Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Management Authority, 124 (2013) [R1]
2013 McBain B, Glasby A, Thompson J, 'Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Action Plan 2007-2017', Hunter-Central Rivers CMA, 65 (2013) [R1]
2011 McBain B, Lenzen M, Albrecht G, 'Advancing Ecological Footprints for Policy Development', State of Environment Reporting Australia, 223 (2011)
2007 McBain V, 'The Hunter-Central Rivers Catchment Action Plan 2006-2015', Hunter-Central Rivers CMA, 328 (2007)
2005 McBain V, 'Central Coast Catchment Blueprint - background documents', Central Coast Catchment Management Board, 178 (2005)
2005 McBain V, Wackernagel M, Lenzen M, Deumling D, 'The Ecological Footprint of Victoria', EPA Victoria, 77 (2005)
2003 McBain B, 'Inland Waters and Wetlands ¿ Water Quality', Resource Planning and Development Commission, Hobart, 3 (2003)
2001 McBain B, 'National Pollutant Inventory aggregate water pollution estimation for Tasmania', Department of Primary Industry, Water and Environment, Hobart, 117 (2001)
1996 Turner J, Lambert M, Lauck V, 'Water quality monitoring strategies for forest management: a case study at Bago State Forest. State Forests of NSW', State Forests of NSW, 25 (1996)
1993 Lauck V, Dillon P, Grams S, Shaw S, Hanna D, Boardman R, et al., 'A preliminary estimate of the water and solute balances of an effluent-irrigated plot in the HIAT Plantations, Bolivar, South Australia', CSIRO Centre for Groundwater Studies, 23 (1993)
Show 10 more reports
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 6
Total funding $771,532

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20141 grants / $219,552

Learning and Teaching Academic Standards (LTAS): Environment and Environmental Sustainability – ID13-2819$219,552

Funding body: Office for Learning and Teaching

Funding body Office for Learning and Teaching
Project Team Doctor Liam Phelan, Doctor Bonnie McBain
Scheme Commissioned Strategic Projects
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301357
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

20064 grants / $549,980

Advancing the Ecological Footprint for Application to Policy Development$249,960

Funding body: Global Footprint Network

Funding body Global Footprint Network
Project Team Doctor Bonnie McBain, Dr Manfred Lenzen, Dr Mathis Wackernagel, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0186956
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Advancing the Ecological Footprint for Application to Policy Development$223,020

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Project Team Doctor Bonnie McBain, Dr Manfred Lenzen, Dr Mathis Wackernagel, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht
Scheme Linkage Projects
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2009
GNo G0186019
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON Y

Advancing the Ecological Footprint for Application to Policy Development$62,000

Funding body: Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities

Funding body Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
Project Team Doctor Bonnie McBain, Dr Manfred Lenzen, Dr Mathis Wackernagel, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0186957
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Advancing the Ecological Footprint for Application to Policy Development$15,000

Funding body: State Forests of NSW

Funding body State Forests of NSW
Project Team Doctor Bonnie McBain, Dr Manfred Lenzen, Dr Mathis Wackernagel, Conjoint Professor Glenn Albrecht
Scheme Linkage Projects Partner Funding
Role Lead
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0186955
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20001 grants / $2,000

WARRA small projects research grant$2,000

Funding body: Forestry Tasmania

Funding body Forestry Tasmania
Project Team

Bonnie McBain

Scheme Small Grants
Role Lead
Funding Start 2000
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding External
Category EXTE
UON N
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News

Wind turbines

Reliable renewable electricity is possible if we make smart decisions now

December 1, 2016

The Australian government is reviewing our electricity market to make sure it can provide secure and reliable power in a rapidly changing world. Faced with the rise of renewable energy and limits on carbon pollution, The Conversation has asked experts what kind of future awaits the grid. The Conversation

Dr Bonnie McBain

Positions

Conjoint Fellow
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Web Learn Tutor Env & Life Sciences
School of Environmental and Life Sciences
Faculty of Science

Focus area

Geography and Environmental Studies

Contact Details

Email bonnie.mcbain@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 8871
Links UoN Blogs
Twitter

Office

Room SR.182
Building Geography.
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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