Associate Professor Alison Lane

Associate Professor Alison Lane

Associate Professor

School of Health Sciences

Making sense of autism

Occupational Therapist Associate Professor Alison Lane has identified specific sensory subtypes in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder that relate to distinct neural profiles and patterns of challenging behaviour.

Alison Lane

Alison's work is focused on investigating the sensory motor basis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), specifically in children, and anchored on three simple but essential questions regarding how they react to sensory input.

Are sensory behaviours the same in all children with ASD?

If not, what causes differences?

And how might understanding differences affect the targeting of therapies?

Years of clinical occupational therapist practice in non-government, community and hospital settings informed Alison's understanding of the barriers to participation children with ASD face. 

"As occupational therapists we use clinical instincts and input from parents to design interventions in an attempt to grow the capacity of children with ASD to manage their behaviours and emotions in normal daily situations," Alison says.

"However, the research to back up our approaches has been lagging. My research is a contribution toward understanding the nature of these sensory behaviours."

"With better understanding we can choose better targeted therapies, and hopefully, we'll see better outcomes."

STRONG STIMULI

Unlocking the secrets of sensory features could vastly improve the lives of many people with ASD, and their families. Alison notes that not all children with ASD have difficulty with sensory input, and not all children with sensory issues have ASD.

"We think around 60% of children with ASD have these difficulties," Alison states.

"So although not every child with ASD has them, it is the majority, and there can be significant issues."

Alison explains by citing a school fire drill as an unexpected stimulus that may unsettle any child. Most children could, she says, follow instructions and ultimately cope.

Comparatively, the same disruption could have a major negative impact on a child with ASD, for whom responding appropriately could be extremely difficult.

"Another sensory stimuli is touch," Alison explains.

"Somebody might touch a child to redirect them, but the child may misinterpret the type of touch and perceive that quite aggressively, as a hostile touch."

"Their general ability to function in their environment is compromised because they experience these various sensory inputs very differently and then that affects their general behaviour."

SENSORY SUBTYPES

Alison's major piece of work to date has been the definition of four distinct sensory subtypes in children with ASD.

This discovery has been replicated in three independent studies.     

An algorithm based on a simple questionnaire for parents assigns children to a particular subtype.

There are two factors determining the appropriate subtype. The first is a child's sensory reactivity, or as Alison explains, "the intensity of their response to sensory input."

The second factor is multi-sensory integration, the ability to integrate and combine multiple sensory inputs that are coming at the same time.

"We have one group that has problems with sensory reactivity, one has problems just with multi-sensory integration, one has problems with both, and one has no problem with either," Alison reveals.

"And there is a severity dimension."

"So the group who has the problems with both have the most sensory symptoms. The ones that don't have issues have the fewest. And the other two are in the middle."

BRAIN PROFILES

Classifying children into subtypes means therapy can be specifically targeted for maximum benefit.

Next, Alison is keen to investigate whether the replication within subtype groups is isolated to sensory features so therapy can be further customised.

"We are trying to establish whether children in a common sensory subtype tend to also have common difficulties or strengths in other areas, like IQ, general behavioural issues and communication abilities," she discloses.

Working with a multi-disciplinary team of University of Newcastle experts, including Professor Ulli Schall, Dr Juanita Todd and Dr Bill Budd, Alison is looking at event related potentials.

Using neuroimaging to measure the electrical activity of the brain, preliminary data suggests that the sensory subtypes do have different brain profiles.

"Parent reported distinctions in behaviour are matching with some basic distinctions in sensory processing in the brain," Alison reports.

"There is a lot of interest in investigating whether subtypes relate to physiological differences, and even further back, at a cellular and genetic level, are there patterns there?"

Understanding the links between behavior and biology may reveal new methods of treatment.

EARLY DIAGNOSIS

Alison's work has already begun to inform treatment, and has the potential to change the anticipated trajectory of children with ASD through early diagnosis. She is also looking for sensory-related patterns in intervention outcome data in partnership with early intervention providers, such as the AEIOU Foundation for children with autism.

It is the first year of life, however, that Alison believes may hold the key to early diagnosis, and therefore offer parents a greater window for intervention.

"Sensory and motor systems are necessarily intertwined in the first year," Alison explains. 

"The motor system is developing, and we know that motor skills are highly dependent on the accurate interpretation of touch, movement and body sense information."

Using video data of babies with known outcomes involved in longitudinal studies, Alison is recording response to sound and touch in an attempt to try to code early sensory motor features.

To further our understanding of early sensory motor development in non-autism groups, Alison is now working with the asthma team at the Hunter Medical Research Institute on a large scale study to track sensory motor outcomes in babies born to mothers with asthma. By carefully following large cohorts of young babies with risk factors for medical and developmental difficulties, Alison hopes to pinpoint the sensory motor features in the first year in life that are related to autism risk in later childhood.

"If we study sensory motor development in a very rigorous way in children who have risk factors for ASD, then follow them through to see which of those children go on to get ASD, we hope to identify early developmental delay."

"Working with babies, we have the potential to change their brain wiring, modifying their responses so they find sensory stimuli less distressing. Both as babies and later in life"

INFORMING INTERVENTIONS

Over 20 years of experience in paediatric occupational therapy practice, health service management, research and teaching are useful background to a major role in the genesis of a new collaborative of researchers interested in neurodevelopment at the University of Newcastle. 

Reflecting on her career, Alison admits that it wasn't just her compassion for children with ASD that drew her sole focus.  

"Early in my career a fellow academic and parent of a child with ASD, put together an Autism research group," Alison recalls.

"She saw me in a meeting one day, and said 'I need an OT for my research group and I pick you.' This area literally chose me."

Discovering how few people internationally were investigating ASD related sensory difficulties, Alison resolved to research this area in depth.

"I think we have made some really good inroads to be honest," Alison says.

"This area still has so much potential which is exciting."

"And we can already be a bit more discriminatory with therapies. With so many to chose from, I think that is really helpful."

Alison Lane

Making sense of autism

Occupational Therapist Associate Professor Alison Lane has identified specific sensory subtypes in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder that relate to disti

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

Research Expertise
My name is Alison Lane and I study sensory features in Autism Spectrum Disorder at the University of Newcastle, Australia. The focus of my work to date has been to identify sensory subtypes in Autism. My studies show that sensory features in Autism vary on the basis of parent reports of the frequency of the behaviours and the sensory modalities affected. Further, these subtypes relate to distinct neural profiles and patterns of challenging behaviours. My current work seeks to validate the use of sensory features as a method of classifying individuals with Autism into clinically meaningful phenotypes. To this end, I am involved in studies examining neurophysiological variation in sensory subtypes (e.g. using event-related potentials, heart rate and electrodermal responsivity). Future studies will explore differential response to treatment in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder based on sensory subtype classification and chart the emergence of sensory subtypes pre-diagnostically in early childhood.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Occupational Therapy, University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (Honours), University of Queensland

Keywords

  • autism
  • autism spectrum disorder
  • child development
  • children
  • evidence based practice
  • neurodevelopmental disability
  • occupational therapy
  • professional practice
  • research methods
  • sensory
  • sensory subtypes

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
110321 Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) 40
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance 60

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Associate Professor University of Newcastle
School of Health Sciences
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2007 - 1/06/2013 Assistant Professor The Ohio State University
School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences
United States
1/06/2002 - 1/07/2004 Clinical Assistant Professor University of Colorado
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
United States

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/04/2002 - 1/07/2004 Director of Occupational Therapy The Children's Hospital, Denver, Colorado
United States
1/07/2000 - 1/01/2002 Director of Occupational Therapy Services Royal's Children Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland
Australia
1/04/1996 - 1/07/2000 Senior Professional Occupational Therapist The Cerebral Palsy League of Queensland
Australia
1/03/1994 - 1/04/1996 Occupational Therapist Ipswich Community Health, Queensland
Australia
1/03/1992 - 1/03/1994 Occupational Therapist WR Black Accomodation Support Services, Queensland
Australia
1/08/1991 - 1/12/1991 Occupational Therapist Brown & Greene-Sullivan Company School Coporations, Indiana
United States
1/01/1991 - 1/07/1991 Child Guidance Therapist Indooroopilly Child Guidance Clinic
Australia

Teaching appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/10/2007 - 1/06/2011 Adjunct Lecturer, Occupational Therapy University of South Australia
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/07/2004 - 1/08/2007 Lecturer, Occupational Therapy University of South Australia
School of Health Sciences
Australia
1/06/2002 - 1/07/2004 Adjunct Lecturer, Occupational Therapy Colorado State University
United States
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Journal article (28 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Schaaf RC, Lane AE, 'Toward a Best-Practice Protocol for Assessment of Sensory Features in ASD', Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45 1380-1395 (2015)

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Sensory difficulties are a commonly occurring feature of autism spectrum disorders and are now included as one manifestation of ... [more]

© 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Sensory difficulties are a commonly occurring feature of autism spectrum disorders and are now included as one manifestation of the ¿restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities¿ diagnostic criteria of the DSM5 necessitating guidelines for comprehensive assessment of these features. To facilitate the development of such guidelines, this paper provides an overview of the literature on sensory features in autism spectrum disorder. We summarize the literature pertaining to: terminology, current assessment practices, sensory development, and the relationship of sensory features to core symptoms of autism. The paper concludes with recommendations for clinical assessment of sensory features in Autism.

DOI 10.1007/s10803-014-2299-z
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
2015 Tanner K, Hand BN, O'Toole G, Lane AE, 'Effectiveness of interventions to improve social participation, play, leisure, and restricted and repetitive behaviors in people with autism spectrum disorder: A systematic review', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69 (2015) [C1]

People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) commonly experience difficulties with social participation, play, and leisure along with restricted and repetitive behaviors that can in... [more]

People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) commonly experience difficulties with social participation, play, and leisure along with restricted and repetitive behaviors that can interfere with occupational performance. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate current evidence for interventions within the occupational therapy scope of practice that address these difficulties. Strong evidence was found that social skills groups, the Picture Exchange Communication System, joint attention interventions, and parent-mediated strategies can improve social participation. The findings were less conclusive for interventions to improve play and leisure performance and to decrease restricted and repetitive behaviors, but several strategies showed promise with moderately strong supporting evidence. Occupational therapists should be guided by evidence when considering interventions to improve social participation, play, leisure, and restricted and repetitive behaviors in people with ASD. Additional research using more robust scientific methods is needed for many of the currently available strategies.

DOI 10.5014/ajot.2015.017806
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Heathcock JC, Tanner K, Robson D, Young R, Lane AE, 'Retrospective analysis of motor development in infants at high and low risk for autism spectrum disorder', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 69 (2015)

Objective. To measure upper-extremity and gross motor skill development in infants with and without risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method. Data were coded retros... [more]

Objective. To measure upper-extremity and gross motor skill development in infants with and without risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method. Data were coded retrospectively from 39 infants who participated in longitudinal structured early developmental assessments. Twenty-five infants were at high risk for ASD, and the remaining 14 infants were classified as low risk. Upper-extremity and motor skill development were coded at ages 2, 4, and 6 mo. Five infants went on to receive an ASD diagnosis at age 2-4 yr. Results. Infants at high risk for ASD demonstrated fewer midline behaviors with the upper extremities and delayed motor skill development than the low-risk group. Differences in motor skills were most apparent at age 4 mo. Conclusion. Early monitoring for motor delay in infants at high risk for ASD is warranted. Midline control and play with the upper extremities and overall motor skill development are possible assessment and therapeutic targets.

DOI 10.5014/ajot.2015.017525
Citations Scopus - 1
2015 Timora J, Hampton R, Lane A, Dennis S, Budd TW, 'Investigating the Influence of Cross-modal Temporal Correspondence on EEG Entrainment: A Comparison between Children and Adults', Front. Hum. Neurosci., (2015)
Co-authors Bill Budd, Simon Dennis
2014 Lane AE, Heathcock JC, 'Early sensory-motor signs of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for clinical practice', Developmental Disabilities Special Interest Section Quarterly, 37 1-3 (2014) [C3]
2014 Eldridge J, Lane AE, Belkin M, Dennis S, 'Robust features for the automatic identification of autism spectrum disorder in children.', J Neurodev Disord, 6 12 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1186/1866-1955-6-12
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Simon Dennis
2014 Lane AE, Molloy CA, Bishop SL, 'Classification of children with autism spectrum disorder by sensory subtype: A case for sensory-based phenotypes', Autism Research, 7 322-333 (2014) [C1]

This study examines whether sensory differences can be used to classify meaningful subgroups of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Caregivers of children with ASD aged ... [more]

This study examines whether sensory differences can be used to classify meaningful subgroups of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Caregivers of children with ASD aged 2-10 years (n=228) completed the Short Sensory Profile. Model-based cluster analysis was used to extract sensory subtypes. The relationship of these subtypes to age, gender, autism symptom severity, and nonverbal intelligence quotient (IQ) was further explored. Four distinct sensory subtypes were identified: (a) sensory adaptive; (b) taste smell sensitive; (c) postural inattentive; and (d) generalized sensory difference. The sensory subtypes differ from each other on two dimensions: (a) the severity of reported sensory differences; and (b) the focus of differences across auditory, taste, smell, vestibular and proprioceptive domains. Examination of the clinical features of each subtype reveals two possible mechanisms of sensory disturbance in autism: (a) sensory hyperreactivity; and (b) difficulties with multisensory processing. Further, the sensory subtypes are not well explained by other variables such as age, gender, IQ, and autism symptom severity. We conclude that classification of children using sensory differences offers a promising method by which to identify phenotypes in ASD. Sensory-based phenotypes may be useful in identifying behavioral features responsive to specific interventions thereby improving intervention effectiveness. Further validation of the sensory-based phenotypes by establishing neural and physiological correlates is recommended. Autism Res 2014, 7: 322-333. © 2014 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

DOI 10.1002/aur.1368
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 6
2014 Lane AE, Geraghty ME, Young GS, Rostorfer JL, 'Problem eating behaviors in autism spectrum disorder are associated with suboptimal daily nutrient intake and taste/smell sensitivity', Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition, 6 172-180 (2014) [C1]

Thirty children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3 to 10 years participated in this study exploring associations between problem eating behaviors, daily nutrient intake, a... [more]

Thirty children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3 to 10 years participated in this study exploring associations between problem eating behaviors, daily nutrient intake, and sensory disturbance. Parents completed surveys regarding the usual eating behaviors of their children. Children exhibiting more severe autism-specific disruptive behaviors at mealtimes were most at risk for suboptimal intake of select nutrients such as biotin, vitamin K, iodine, linolenic omega-3 fatty acids, and choline, which play a role in metabolism and bone and brain health. Children exhibiting food refusal tended to have increased caloric and nutrient intake. Picky eaters were more likely to consume adequate daily nutrients but experienced the highest levels of parent-reported taste/smell sensitivity. The findings of this preliminary study support a multifactorial approach to the management of problem eating behaviors in ASD. © 2014 The Author(s).

DOI 10.1177/1941406414523981
2013 Phillips RL, Olds T, Boshoff K, Lane AE, 'Measuring activity and participation in children and adolescents with disabilities: A literature review of available instruments', AUSTRALIAN OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY JOURNAL, 60 288-300 (2013) [D1]
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12055
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
2013 Egelhoff K, Lane AE, 'Brief Report: Preliminary Reliability, Construct Validity and Standardization of the Auditory Behavior Questionnaire (ABQ) for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 43 978-984 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10803-012-1626-5
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Case-Smith J, Holland T, Lane A, White S, 'Effect of a Coteaching Handwriting Program for First Graders: One-Group Pretest-Posttest Design', AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 66 396-405 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.5014/ajot.2012.004333
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 5
2012 Lane A, Harpster K, Heathcock J, 'Motor Characteristics of Young Children Referred for Possible Autism Spectrum Disorder', PEDIATRIC PHYSICAL THERAPY, 24 21-29 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1097/PEP.0b013e31823e071a
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 7
2011 Raghavendra P, Virgo R, Olsson C, Connell T, Lane AE, 'Activity participation of children with complex communication needs, physical disabilities and typically-developing peers', DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROREHABILITATION, 14 145-155 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.3109/17518423.2011.568994
Citations Scopus - 23Web of Science - 20
2011 Lane AE, Dennis SJ, Geraghty ME, 'Brief Report: Further Evidence of Sensory Subtypes in Autism', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 41 826-831 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10803-010-1103-y
Citations Scopus - 26Web of Science - 20
Co-authors Simon Dennis
2010 Geraghty ME, Depasquale GM, Lane AE, 'Nutritional Intake and Therapies in Autism: A Spectrum of What We Know: Part 1', ICAN: Infant, Child, & Adolescent Nutrition, 2 62-69 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1941406409358437
2010 Geraghty ME, Bates-Wall J, Ratliff-Schaub K, Lane AE, 'Nutritional Interventions and Therapies in Autism: A Spectrum of What We Know: Part 2', ICAN: Infant, Child, & Adolescent Nutrition, 2 120-133 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1941406410366848
2010 Maher CA, Williams MT, Olds T, Lane AE, 'An internet-based physical activity intervention for adolescents with cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial', DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, 52 448-455 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2009.03609.x
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
2010 Lane AE, Young RL, Baker AEZ, Angley MT, 'Sensory Processing Subtypes in Autism: Association with Adaptive Behavior', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 40 112-122 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10803-009-0840-2
Citations Scopus - 84Web of Science - 77
2010 Taylor RL, Olds T, Boshoff K, Lane AE, 'Children's conceptualization of the term 'satisfaction': relevance for measuring health outcomes', CHILD CARE HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, 36 663-669 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2214.2010.01105.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
2010 Gibbs D, Boshoff K, Lane A, 'Understanding parenting occupations in neonatal intensive care: application of the Person-Environment-Occupation Model', BRITISH JOURNAL OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 73 55-63 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.4276/030802210X12658062793762
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
2010 Lane AE, Ziviani JM, 'Factors influencing skilled use of the computer mouse by school-aged children', COMPUTERS & EDUCATION, 55 1112-1122 (2010) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.compedu.2010.05.008
Citations Scopus - 11Web of Science - 7
2008 Baker AEZ, Lane A, Angley MT, Young RL, 'The relationship between sensory processing patterns and behavioural responsiveness in autistic disorder: A pilot study', JOURNAL OF AUTISM AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, 38 867-875 (2008) [C1]
DOI 10.1007/s10803-007-0459-0
Citations Scopus - 73Web of Science - 61
2008 Maher CA, Olds T, Williams MT, Lane AE, 'Self-reported quality of life in adolescents with cerebral palsy', Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 28 41-57 (2008) [C1]

Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) is an important outcome in the delivery of health care. Research on the HRQOL in young people with cerebral palsy (CP) has relied on proxy-r... [more]

Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) is an important outcome in the delivery of health care. Research on the HRQOL in young people with cerebral palsy (CP) has relied on proxy-reports from parents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the self-reported HRQOL of young people with CP. A survey was mailed to 229 adolescents with CP in South Australia, of which 118 responded (51.5%). Seventy-one participants 11 to 17 years of age, self-reported HRQOL on the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL). Thirty-eight youth were deemed by their parent/guardian as having insufficient cognitive ability to self-report HRQOL and nine respondents returned their surveys incomplete. The mean PedsQL Physical Function score was 57.3 (SD = 24.3), the mean Psychosocial Function score was 64.5 (SD = 15.9), and the Overall PedsQL score was 62.0 (SD = 16.7). Compared to norms for children without disabilities, 67% of participants had an Overall PedsQL score greater than 1 SD below the mean. PedsQL scores were related to gross motor function classification level (Spearman's rho = -0.54), number of health issues (rho = -0.51), and socioeconomic status (rho = 0.28), but not age, gender, quality of sleep, or whether parent assistance was needed to complete the PedsQL. The results have implications for policy and efforts to identify and address barriers to full and satisfying participation in mainstream schools and community activities.

DOI 10.1300/J006v28n01_04
Citations Scopus - 16
2007 Maher CA, Williams MT, Olds T, Lane AE, 'Physical and sedentary activity in adolescents with cerebral palsy', DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY, 49 450-457 (2007)
Citations Scopus - 113Web of Science - 106
2003 Lane A, Ziviani J, 'Assessing childrens competence in computer interactions: Preliminary reliability and validity of the test of mouse proficiency', OTJR-OCCUPATION PARTICIPATION AND HEALTH, 23 18-26 (2003)
Citations Web of Science - 5
2002 Lane A, Ziviani J, 'Enabling computer access: Introduction to the test of mouse proficiency', OTJR-OCCUPATION PARTICIPATION AND HEALTH, 22 111-118 (2002)
Citations Web of Science - 6
1999 Lane A, Ziviani J, 'Children's computer access: Analysis of the visual-motor demands of software designed for children', British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62 19-25 (1999)

As technology access becomes an increasingly important activity of daily living, debate persists as to the manner in which computers are best able to assist children in educationa... [more]

As technology access becomes an increasingly important activity of daily living, debate persists as to the manner in which computers are best able to assist children in educational and recreational settings. In particular, information regarding the suitability of commonly used child-computer interfaces is required. Occupational therapists are uniquely qualified to assess and problem-solve computer access issues but, to date, have limited the application of this skill to the areas of rehabilitation and disability. This paper describes a process where the traditional occupational therapy tool of task analysis was used to identify the visual-motor demands of the children's computer game packages that use the mouse for operation. The first author examined 12 game packages comprising 45 separate games and applications and recorded information on the types of movement, task design features and recommended ages for all games. The results of the analysis are discussed in terms of the degree of visual-motor development that is required of children accessing these games and the implications for game designers producing developmentally sensitive software.

Citations Scopus - 4
1997 Lane AE, Ziviani JM, 'The suitability of the mouse for children's use: a review of the literature', Journal of Computing in Childhood Education, 8 227-245 (1997) [C1]
Show 25 more journal articles

Review (1 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2006 Lane AE, 'The science and fiction of autism', HEALTH (2006)
DOI 10.1177/1363459306070295

Conference (52 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Lane AE, Philpott-Robinson K, 'Stability of sensory subtype one year following diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder' (2015)
2015 Timora J, Hampton R, Lane AE, Dennis SJ, Budd TW, 'Investigating the influence of cross-modal temporal correspondence on EEG entrainment: A comparison between children and adults.' (2015)
2015 Schaaf R, Lane AE, 'Heart rate variability as a function of sensory subtype in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder' (2015)
2015 Lane AE, Schaaf R, 'Sensory Subtypes and Heart Rate Variability in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder' (2015)
2015 Lane AE, Eldridge J, Hand B, Harpster K, Dennis S, 'Auditory event-related potentials as a function of clinical sensory subtype in Autism Spectrum Disorder' (2015)
Co-authors Simon Dennis
2015 Lane AE, 'Sensory subtypes in autism spectrum disorder: Implications for practice', Australian Occupational Therapy Journal (2015) [E3]
2015 Lane AE, Persch A, Rowlandson L, Harpster K, Bodison S, Tomchek S, 'A critical review of measures of sensory processing for children aged 2-10 years', Australian Journal of Occupational Therapy (2015) [E3]
2014 Lane AE, Eldridge J, Belkin M, Dennis SJ, 'Robust features for the automatic identification of autism spectrum disorder in children' (2014)
2014 Ellawadi AB, Heathcock J, Lane AE, McCauley R, 'Coordination of verbal and nonverbal communication in infants at risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder' (2014)
2014 Rowlandson L, Young R, Campbell L, Lane AE, 'Temperament and sensory features in infants at risk of autism: A retrospective video analysis study' (2014)
2014 Mrowzinski S, Lane AE, Heathcock J, '¿Infants at high risk of autism show delayed motor development when compared to typically developing infants"' (2014)
2014 Philpott-Robinson K, Harpster K, Lane AE, 'Sensory subtypes in toddlers with risk factors for Autism Spectrum Disorder' (2014)
2014 Lane AE, Tanner K, 'Patterns of general behavior as a function of sensory subtype in children with autism' (2014)
2013 Lane AE, Molloy C, Bishop S, Manning P, '¿Characterization of autism phenotypes using sensory features¿.' (2013)
2013 Tanner K, Lane AE, '¿Patterns of general behavior in autism as a function of sensory subtype¿.' (2013)
2013 Hand B, Heathcock J, '¿Sensory features in infants with and without risk factors for autism¿.' (2013)
2012 Lane AE, Edlridge J, Harpster K, Dennis SJ, Shahin T, Belkin M, '"Support vector machine (SVM) analysis of auditory oddball event-related potentials (ERPs) classifies toddlers with and without early signs of autism"' (2012)
2012 Raghavendra P, McInerney R, Olsson C, Connell T, Lane AE, '"Self-determination of children with physical disabilities, complex communication needs and typical peers"' (2012)
2011 Harpster K, Sloutsky V, Lane AE, '"Auditory processing in young children with and without early signs of autism utilizing Event Related Potentials."' (2011)
2011 Lane AE, Heathcock JC, Roboson D, Young RL, '"Sensory-motor features of infants with and without risk factors for autism"' (2011)
2011 Heathcock JC, Lane AE, '"Motor characteristics of young children with Autism Spectrum Disorders are much lower than normal references."' (2011)
2010 Geraghty ME, Lane AE, '"Nutrient Intake, Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Intestinal Microflora in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder."' (2010)
2010 Harpster K, Sloutsky V, Lane AE, '"Sensory Processing in Infants with and without Risk for Autism During the First Year of Life."' (2010)
2010 Altenburger J, Geraghty ME, Wolf K, Taylor C, Lane AE, '"The Quality of Nutritional Intake in Children with Autism."' (2010)
2010 Lane AE, Geraghty ME, '"Can Problem Eating Behaviors in Autism Be Explained by Sensory Subtype."' (2010)
2010 Egelhoff J, Lane AE, Roup C, '"Development of the Auditory Behavior Questionnaire."' (2010)
2010 Taylor RL, Olds TS, Boshoff K, Lane AE, '"Activity participation patterns of children with Asperger Syndrome: implications for health."' (2010)
2010 Altenburger J, Geraghty ME, Wolf K, Lane AE, '"The Quality of Nutritional Intake in Children with Autism."' (2010)
2010 Raghavendra P, Virgo R, Olsson C, Lane AE, 'Comparison of social networks and activity participation of children with physical disabilities, complex communication needs and typical peers' (2010)
2010 Lane AE, Young R, Baker A, Angely M, 'Making sense of sensory processing in autism: evidence for the existence of sensory subtypes' (2010)
2009 Raghavendra P, Virgo R, Olsson C, Lane AE, Connell T, 'The Power of Participation: How do children with and without complex communication needs participate at home, school and in the community' (2009)
2009 Raghavendra P, Lane AE, Olds T, Virgo R, Olsson C, Connell T, 'How do children with cerebral palsy and complex communication needs use their time? Relationship between time use and activity participation' (2009)
2009 Lane AE, Young RL, Baker AEZ, Angely MT, 'Sensory subtypes in autism' (2009)
2009 Raghavendra P, Virgo R, Olsson C, Lane AE, Connell T, 'Participation patterns of children with and without complex communication needs: Relationship between communication, social networks and school participation' (2009)
2009 Harpster K, Lane AE, 'Sensory processing in infants with and without risk factors for autism in the first year of life' (2009)
2009 Geraghty M, Lane AE, 'Nutrient intake, gastrointestinal symptoms and stool microflora in ASD children' (2009)
2009 Lane AE, Geraghty M, 'Sensory processing and problem eating behaviors in children with autism' (2009)
2009 Mitchell L, Mayer N, Geraghty M, Lane AE, 'Sensory processing difficulties and problem eating behaviors in children with autism' (2009)
2008 Lane AE, Baker AZ, Young R, Angely M, 'Using video observations to explore sensory processing in children with autism: inspiration for a diagnostic instrument' (2008)
2008 Raghavendra P, Lane AE, Olsson C, Connell T, Virgo R, 'Participation patterns of children with complex communication needs: relationship between communication, social networks and activity engagement' (2008)
2008 Taylor R, Olds T, Boshoff K, Lane AE, 'Children¿s conceptualization and description of their feelings towards involvement in activities' (2008)
2008 Raghavendra P, Lane AE, Virgo R, Olsson C, Connell T, 'Participation patterns of children with complex communication needs: relationship between communication, social networks and activity engagement' (2008)
2007 Maher CA, Williams MT, Olds T, Lane AE, 'Using the internet to increase physical activity in teenagers with cerebral palsy ¿ are you kidding?! Part 1 ¿ Program usability testing' (2007)
2007 Maher CA, Williams MT, Olds T, Lane AE, 'Quality of life in adolescents with cerebral palsy' (2007)
2007 Maher C, Williams MT, Olds T, Lane AE, 'Physical and sedentary activity in adolescents with cerebral palsy' (2007)
2007 Maher CA, Williams MT, Olds T, Lane AE, 'Adolescents with cerebral palsy ¿ do patterns of physical and sedentary activity differ from able bodied adolescents' (2007)
2006 Lane AE, Seger R, Summers C, Keenan K, 'Establishing the identity, efficacy and relevance of occupational therapy using occupation-centered practice' (2006)
2006 Lane AE, 'Beyond capacity-building: the challenge of 'participation' for occupational therapy' (2006)
2005 Taylor R, Lane AE, 'Activity participation patterns of children following a traumatic brain injury: A preliminary study' (2005)
2002 Lane AE, 'Assessing Children¿s Mouse Competence' (2002)
2000 Lane AE, 'Of mice and minors: assessing children¿s mouse competence' (2000)
1993 Lane AE, 'Developing a unique role for occupational therapy in child and adolescent psychiatry' (1993)
Show 49 more conferences
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 12
Total funding $5,162,691

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20161 grants / $7,173

2016 International Visitor from University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill USA$7,173

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Professor Shelly Lane, Associate Professor Alison Lane, Professor Grace Baranek
Scheme International Research Visiting Fellowship
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1501022
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20153 grants / $35,758

Expanding Occupational Therapy (OT) clinical placements to schools: feasibility, efficacy and sustainability.$26,936

Funding body: Mid North Coast Local Health District

Funding body Mid North Coast Local Health District
Project Team Associate Professor Alison Lane, Mrs Gjyn O'Toole, Ms Narelle Herbert
Scheme Hunter and Coast ICTN Research and Quality Improvement Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1500755
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON Y

Breathing for Life Trial: Infant Development$7,322

Funding body: Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle

Funding body Faculty of Science and Information Technology, University of Newcastle
Project Team
Scheme Small Research Grants
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

International Meeting for Autism Research, Utah USA, 14-16 May 2015$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Health and Medicine
Project Team Associate Professor Alison Lane
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500544
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20111 grants / $4,147,252

Leadership Education Excellence in Caring for Children with Neurodevelopment and Related Disabilities$4,147,252

Funding body: Department of Health and Human Services

Funding body Department of Health and Human Services
Project Team
Scheme JFK Partners - LEND
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20101 grants / $55,555

Clinical and Neurophysiological Identification of Sensory Dysfunction in Autism$55,555

Funding body: Center for Clinical and Translational Science - The Ohio State University

Funding body Center for Clinical and Translational Science - The Ohio State University
Project Team
Scheme Allied Health Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON N

20091 grants / $772,953

Write Start: Development of an Integrated Occupational Therapy Writing Program$772,953

Funding body: Institute of Education Sciences

Funding body Institute of Education Sciences
Project Team
Scheme NCSER-RelSer, G2
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON N

20081 grants / $44,000

Participation Profiles of Children with Complex Communication Needs - Year 2 Funding$44,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20073 grants / $70,000

Participation Profiles of Children with Complex Communication Needs$31,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Assistive Technology Solutions for Students with Physical Disabilities: An Analysis of Utility, Costs and Student Satisfaction$30,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

Augmenting an Autism Phenotyping Tool with Sensory Processing Information$9,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N

20061 grants / $30,000

Assistive Technology Solutions for Students with Physical Disabilities: An Analysis of Utility, Costs and Student Satisfaction$30,000

Funding body: Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation

Funding body Channel 7 Children's Research Foundation
Project Team
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2006
Funding Finish 2006
GNo
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed0
Current1

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.7

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2015 PhD Preliminary Investigation of Sensory Features in Pre-Term Infants in the First Year of Life.
PhD (Occupational Therapy), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle
Principal Supervisor
Edit

Associate Professor Alison Lane

Position

Associate Professor
School of Health Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Contact Details

Email alison.lane@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5004
Fax (02) 4921 7053

Office

Room Hunter HB-05
Building Hunter Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
Edit