Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop

Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop

Conjoint Professor

School of Medicine and Public Health (Medicine)

Career Summary

Biography

With over 23 years experience as an addiction clinician and clinician/researcher, I currently serve as the Area Director and Addiction Medicine Senior Staff Specialist with Hunter New England Local Health District, Drug & Alcohol Clinical Services (2007-current). I also hold the position of Chief Addiction Medicine Specialist (2014 - current) for the Centre for Population Health, NSW Ministry of Health following the appointment as Clinical Advisor in Drug and Alcohol (2012-2013). I am a Conjoint Professor with the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle and a member of the Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute.

I have extensive clinical experience in managing patients with a wide range of substance use problems including opioids, stimulants, cannabis, tobacco and alcohol, the provision of services for groups with distinct needs including pregnant women, parents with substance use problems, indigenous people and rural populations. My position for the HNE Health District spans a range of clinical addiction work. This includes inpatient withdrawal and hospital consultation liaison services, outpatient treatment, community opiate substitution prescribing and attendance at the amphetamine and cannabis clinics. I am also a member of the high risk maternal service for pregnant women who use substances.

In 2010 I was awarded Clinical Leader of the Year at the HNE Health District Staff Achievement Awards for providing outstanding medical leadership, my commitment to and respect for patients of disadvantaged groups and for driving the service to become more patient-centred. Nominated by fellow staff members, I was also recognised for my contribution to research, significant growth of the service since my appointment, encouraging staff to use evidence based care and leading a robust clinical review process to ensure the delivery of care is safe and appropriate. In 2005 I received a Churchill Fellowship to study addiction and pregnancy treatment in the USA, Canada, UK and Europe.

In addition to ensuring the provision of high quality clinical care, I have a keen interest in the improvement of care through clinically relevant research. I have attracted significant collaborative research funding.  This has provided assistance to investigate and publish research that has made important impacts on both health practice and patient outcomes in addiction. For example, I have been involved in research that has: evaluated stimulant treatment in NSW following the provision of a new service that resulted in reductions in methamphetamine use and improvements in mental health (McKetin R., Dunlop A., et al., 2013);   assisted in the development of national guidelines for opioid dependence (Lintzeris N., Leung S., Dunlop A., et al., 2013); established Hepatitis C treatment in opiate treatment settings (Alavi  M., Grebely J., Micallef M., Dunlop A., 2013); validated and implemented a brief treatment outcome measure in Australian drug and alcohol settings (Ryan A., Holmes J., Hunt V., Dunlop A., et al., 2014); trialled a new medication for cannabis withdrawal (Allsop D., Copeland J., Lintzeris N., Dunlop A. J., et al 2014).

I have maintained an extensive collaborative research network that includes clinician researchers and university based academics both nationally and internationally. A significant international collaborative effort that I was involved in was the systematic Cochrane review of LAAM. My ongoing commitment to positively influence patient-centred service delivery is supported by my continued involvement in the development of clinical guidelines including opioid dependence, drug use during pregnancy, smoking cessation and prescribing in drug withdrawal. I have also authored patient education booklets and multiple book chapters.

I am a foundation Fellow of the Chapter of Addiction Medicine in the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, was state branch chair for the NSW/ACT from 2007-2011, after being honorary national secretary from 2004-2006. I have been the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs (APSAD) president (2009-2011) and have played a key role in their annual conference, and developing joint national and international conferences. For example, I was involved in facilitating the recent 2013 National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) International Forum held in San Diego, USA, sponsored by the NIDA International Program and APSAD. I am a member of the Australian Association of Consultant Physicians and key international professional addiction research and clinical groups including the College of Problems on Drug Dependence (CPDD, USA), Society for the Study of Addiction (UK), the International Society for Addiction Medicine and International Doctors for Health Drug Policies. In addition to being a CPDD member, I also sit on the CPDD, NIDA International Committee. My inclusion in multiple state and national health advisory groups and steering committees that focus on the enhancement of models of care across drug and alcohol settings, further highlights the clinically significant impact my work and experience has made in the field.

In 2010 I was invited to present at the Europad conference in Slovenia and in 2009 at the Toxicmanie, Hepatits, Sida conference in France. I have reviewed manuscripts for national and international journals including Addiction, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Drug and Alcohol Review, Australian Family Physician, Australian Prescriber and British Journal of Criminology.


Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New South Wales
  • Certificate of Registration - Medical Practitioner, Medical Board of Victoria
  • Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery, University of Melbourne
  • Graduate Diploma in Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of Melbourne

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • amphetamine
  • cannabis
  • opioid dependence
  • parenting
  • pregnancy
  • substance use disorders
  • tobacco

Languages

  • English (Mother)

Fields of Research

Code Description Percentage
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified 100

Professional Experience

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2007 -  Conjoint Associate Professor The University of Newcastle
School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health
Australia

Professional appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2014 -  Chief Addiction Medicine Specialist, NSW Health

NSW Ministry of Health
Australia
1/01/2012 - 31/12/2013 Clinical Advisor in Drug and Alcohol, Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO) NSW Ministry of Health
Australia
1/01/2007 -  Area Director, Senior Staff Specialist, Drug and Alcohol Clinical Services

Hunter New England Local Health District
1/01/2005 - 31/12/2006 Head of Medical Services Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre
1/01/2002 - 31/12/2004 Addiction Specialist Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre
1/01/1995 - 31/12/2006 Specialist, Senior Fellow (Honorary) The University of Melbourne
Department of Medicine, St Vincent's Hospital
Australia
1/01/1995 - 31/12/2001 Medical Officer; Senior Medical Officer Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre
1/01/1994 - 31/12/1995 Medical Officer Drug Services Victoria
Australia
1/01/1992 - 31/12/1993 Medical Officer Central Australian Aboriginal Congress
Australia
1/01/1991 - 31/12/1992 Intern, Resident Medical Officer Preston and Northcote Community Hospital
Australia

Awards

Professional

Year Award
2015 James Rankin Orator APSAD
Australian Professional Society for Alcohol and Other Drugs
2014 Clinician Award for Excellence in Science, Research & Practice APSAD
Australian Professional Society for Alcohol and Other Drugs
2010 Clinical Leader of the Year Hunter New England Area Health Service
Hunter New England Area Health Service
1999 John Dobson Award NZ Methadone Conference
NZ Methadone Conference

Research Award

Year Award
2005 Churchill Fellowship Opiate dependence and pregnancy
Churchill Trust
Edit

Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Chapter (8 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Oei J, Gordon A, Perry N, Ludlow J, Burns L, Harvey-Dodds L, Dunlop A, 'Pregnancy, infant, and parenting', Addiction Medicine: Principles and Practice, IP Communications, Melbourne 265-277 (2015) [B1]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Dunlop A, Perry N, Robinson M, 'Therapeutic relationship', Addiction medicine: principles and practice, IP Communications, Melbourne 104-113 (2015) [B2]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Dunlop A, Petroulias D, Marope D, Khoo K, Kimber J, Ritter A, et al., 'Pharmacotherapies And Pregnancy', Pharmacotherapies For The Treatment Of Opioid Dependence: Efficacy, Cost-Effectiveness And Implementation Guidelines, Informa Healthcare, New York., New York (2009)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2008 Dunlop AJ, 'Patient-centredness and opioid substitution', Drugs and Public Health: Australian Perspectives on Policy and Practice, Oxford University Press, Oxford 95-102 (2008) [B1]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2006 Bell J, Dunlop A, 'Managing opioid dependence in pregnant women', Background papers to the National Clinical Guidelines for the management of drug use during pregnancy, birth and the early development years of the newborn, NSW Department of Health, Sydney (2006)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2003 Hulse G, Khong E, Cape G, Dunlop A, Whelan G, Warhaft N, 'Substance Use and the Medical Practitioner', Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne (2003)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2003 Hulse G, O'Neil G, Dunlop A, Lopatko O, Pearson V, Basso M, 'The Pregnant Heroin User', Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Case Studies Workbook, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne (2003)
Co-authors A Dunlop
1997 Dunlop A, Ezard N, 'New Pharmacotherapies and Aboriginal Communities', New Pharmacotherapies Feasibility Report, Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Fitzroy, Victoria (1997)
Co-authors A Dunlop
Show 5 more chapters

Journal article (75 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2017 Kevin RC, Allsop DJ, Lintzeris N, Dunlop AJ, Booth J, McGregor IS, 'Urinary cannabinoid levels during nabiximols (Sativex((R)))-medicated inpatient cannabis withdrawal', FORENSIC TOXICOLOGY, 35 33-44 (2017)
DOI 10.1007/s11419-016-0330-0
Co-authors A Dunlop
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Smoking cessation care provision in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services: A cross-sectional survey of staff self-reported practices', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 77 101-106 (2017)

© 2017Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client's smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all smoke... [more]

© 2017Introduction Clinical practice guidelines recommend alcohol and other drug (AOD) services assess client's smoking status and offer smoking cessation care (SCC) to all smokers. The aim of this study was to examine Australian AOD program staff report of recommended SCC practices: assessment and recording of smoking status; and the provision of 9 types of SCC. The study also assessed how the decision to provide SCC is made and the AOD program service and AOD staff characteristics associated with the provision of SCC. Methods Between July¿October 2014, treatment staff from 31 Australian AOD services participated in an online cross-sectional survey. In addition, a site contact at each service was interviewed to gather service related data. Results Overall, 362 AOD program staff participated (response rate¿=¿57%) and 62% estimated that client smoking status was recorded for the ¿majority or all¿ of their clients. About a third (33%) reported that they ¿always¿ provide verbal advice to their clients to quit smoking, 18% ¿always¿ offered free or subsidized NRT and 16% ¿always¿ followed-up to check on client quit progress. Thirty percent reported that the decision to provide SCC was made on a client by client basis and 26% offered SCC only when the client requested assistance. Government-managed services, age and gender of AOD program staff were significantly associated with the provision of SCC. Conclusion Most AOD program staff report that smoking status is recorded for the majority of their clients however, the frequency with which SCC practices are delivered is low and the decision to provide care is arbitrary.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.04.003
Co-authors A Dunlop, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2017 Dunlop AJ, Brown AL, Oldmeadow C, Harris A, Gill A, Sadler C, et al., 'Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of unsupervised buprenorphine-naloxone for the treatment of heroin dependence in a randomized waitlist controlled trial.', Drug Alcohol Depend, 174 181-191 (2017)
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.01.016
Co-authors A Dunlop, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
2017 Skelton E, Bonevski B, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, et al., 'Tobacco smoking policies in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment services, agreement between staff awareness and the written policy document.', BMC Public Health, 17 87 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3968-y
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, A Dunlop, Flora Tzelepis
2017 Holliday SM, Hayes C, Dunlop AJ, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson KM, et al., 'Does brief chronic pain management education change opioid prescribing rates? A pragmatic trial in Australian early-career general practitioners.', Pain, 158 278-288 (2017)
DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000755
Co-authors Liz Holliday, Parker Magin, A Dunlop
2017 Skelton E, Tzelepis F, Shakeshaft A, Guillaumier A, Dunlop A, McCrabb S, et al., 'Addressing tobacco in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment settings: a cross-sectional survey of staff attitudes and perceived barriers.', Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy, 12 20 (2017)
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0106-5
Co-authors Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis, A Dunlop
2016 Mitchell J, Dunlop A, 'Alcohol consumption: monitoring, regulation and impact on public health', PUBLIC HEALTH RESEARCH & PRACTICE, 26 (2016)
DOI 10.17061/phrp2641640
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wolfenden L, Wye P, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Modifiable health risk behaviours and attitudes towards behaviour change of clients attending community-based substance use treatment services', Drug and Alcohol Review, (2016)

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Health risk behaviours, such as smoking, nutrition and physical inactivity, are signifi... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Health risk behaviours, such as smoking, nutrition and physical inactivity, are significant contributors to chronic disease for people with substance use disorders. This study reports the prevalence of these behaviours amongst substance use treatment clients, their attitudes towards modifying such behaviours and the acceptability of receiving support to do so. Client characteristics associated with risk status and interest in modifying behaviours were examined. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with clients of 15 community substance use treatment services within in New South Wales, Australia. Data for the study were collected via computer assisted telephone interviews. Results: Of those contactable and eligible, 386 (71%) clients completed the survey. Clients reported a high prevalence of smoking (80%), insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption (89%) and insufficient physical activity (31%). Overall, 51-69% of clients reported considering modifying their health risk behaviours and 88-97% thought it was acceptable to be provided preventive care to address such behaviours. Younger clients were more likely to smoke (18-34years (odds ratio [OR]=4.6 [95% confidence interval [CI]=1.9, 11.3]); 35-54years (OR=2.6 [95% CI=1.2, 5.7])) and be interested in increasing vegetable consumption (18-34years (OR=4.4 [95% CI=1.3, 14.8]); 35-54years (OR=8.0 [95% CI=2.5, 25.4])) than older clients (=55years). Discussion and Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of health risk behaviours amongst clients of community substance use treatment services. However, contrary to commonly cited barriers to care provision, clients are interested in modifying their risk behaviours and report that receiving preventive care to address these behaviours is acceptable.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12439
Co-authors John Wiggers, A Dunlop, Luke Wolfenden, Kate Bartlem, Jenny Bowman
2016 Hamilton M, Dunlop AJ, '"Ice" (crystal methamphetamine): concerns and responses', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 204 136-137 (2016)
DOI 10.5694/mja15.01253
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Dunlop AJ, Newman LK, 'ADHD and psychostimulants - overdiagnosis and overprescription', MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA, 204 139-139 (2016)
DOI 10.5694/mja15.01387
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Fraser S, Pienaar K, Dilkes-Frayne E, Moore D, Kokanovic R, Treloar C, Dunlop A, 'Addiction stigma and the biopolitics of liberal modernity: A qualitative analysis', International Journal of Drug Policy, (2016)

© 2017 Elsevier B.V.Definitions of addiction have never been more hotly contested. The advance of neuroscientific accounts has not only placed into public awareness a highly cont... [more]

© 2017 Elsevier B.V.Definitions of addiction have never been more hotly contested. The advance of neuroscientific accounts has not only placed into public awareness a highly controversial explanatory approach, it has also shed new light on the absence of agreement among the many experts who contest it. Proponents argue that calling addiction a 'brain disease' is important because it is destigmatising. Many critics of the neuroscientific approach also agree on this point. Considered from the point of view of the sociology of health and illness, the idea that labelling something a disease will alleviate stigma is a surprising one. Disease, as demonstrated in that field of research, is routinely stigmatised. In this article we take up the issue of stigma as it plays out in relation to addiction, seeking to clarify and challenge the claims made about the progress associated with disease models. To do so, we draw on Erving Goffman's classic work on stigma, reconsidering it in light of more recent, process oriented, theoretical resources, and posing stigmatisation as a performative biopolitical process. Analysing recently collected interviews conducted with 60 people in Australia who consider themselves to have an alcohol or other drug addiction, dependence or habit, we explore their accounts of stigma, finding experiences of stigma to be common, multiple and strikingly diverse. We argue that by treating stigma as politically productive - as a contingent biopolitically performative process rather than as a stable marker of some kind of anterior difference - we can better understand what it achieves. This allows us to consider not simply how the 'disease' of addiction can be destigmatised, or even whether the 'diseasing' of addiction is itself stigmatising (although this would seem a key question), but whether the very problematisation of 'addiction' in the first place constitutes a stigma process.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.02.005
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'Provision of Chronic Disease Preventive Care in Community Substance Use Services: Client and Clinician Report', Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 68 24-30 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 The Authors.Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care m... [more]

© 2016 The Authors.Introduction: People with substance use problems have a higher prevalence of modifiable health risk behaviors. Routine clinician provision of preventive care may be effective in reducing such health behaviors. This study aimed to examine clinician provision of preventive care to clients of community substance use treatment services. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 386 clients and 54 clinicians of community substance use treatment services in one health district in New South Wales, Australia. Client- and clinician-reported provision of three elements of care (assessment, brief advice and referral) for three health risk behaviors (tobacco smoking, insufficient fruit and/or vegetable consumption and insufficient physical activity) was assessed, with associations with client characteristics examined. Results: Provision was highest for tobacco smoking assessment (90% client reported, 87% clinician reported) and brief advice (79% client reported, 80% clinician reported) and lowest for fruit and vegetable consumption (assessment 23%, brief advice 25%). Few clients reported being offered a referral (<. 10%). Assessment of physical activity and brief advice for all behaviors was higher for clients residing in rural/remote areas. Conclusion: Assessment and brief advice were provided to the majority of clients for smoking, but sub-optimally for the other behaviors. Further investigation of barriers to the provision of preventive care within substance use treatment settings is required, particularly for referral to ongoing support.

DOI 10.1016/j.jsat.2016.05.006
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Kate Bartlem, John Wiggers, A Dunlop, Jenny Bowman, Luke Wolfenden
2016 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, Attia J, McEvoy M, Dunlop A, Scott R, 'Genetic feedback to reduce alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with risky drinking: Feasibility and acceptability', Public Health Research and Practice, 26 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Johnson et al.Objective: There have been no trials in healthcare settings of genetic susceptibility feedback in relation to alcohol consumption. The purpose of this study ... [more]

© 2016 Johnson et al.Objective: There have been no trials in healthcare settings of genetic susceptibility feedback in relation to alcohol consumption. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and acceptability of conducting a full-scale randomised trial estimating the effect of personalised genetic susceptibility feedback on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with risky drinking. Methods: Outpatients =18 years of age who reported drinking more than 14 standard drinks in the past week or in a typical week were asked to provide a saliva sample for genetic testing. Genetic susceptibility feedback was posted to participants 6 months after recruitment. The co-primary outcomes were the proportion of participants who (i) provided a saliva sample that could be genotyped, and (ii) spoke with a genetic counsellor. Secondary outcomes included changes in patients' weekly alcohol consumption; scores on scales measuring readiness to change, importance of changing and confidence in ability to change drinking habits; knowledge about which cancers are alcohol-attributable; and acceptability of the saliva collection procedure and the genetic-feedback intervention. McNemar's test and paired t-tests were used to test for differences between baseline and follow-up in proportions and means, respectively. Results: Of 100 participants who provided a saliva sample, 93 had adequate DNA for at least one genotyping assay. Three participants spoke to a genetic counsellor. Patients' readiness to change their drinking, their views on the importance of changing and their stated confidence in their ability to change increased between baseline and follow-up. There was no increase in patients' knowledge about alcohol-attributable cancers nor any reduction in how much alcohol they drank 4 months after receiving the feedback. Most participants (80%) were somewhat comfortable or very comfortable with the process used to collect saliva, 84% understood the genetic feedback, 54% found it useful, 10% had sought support to reduce their drinking after receiving the feedback, and 37% reported that the feedback would affect how much they drink in the future. Conclusion: Results of this study suggest it would be feasible to conduct a methodologically robust trial estimating the effect of genetic susceptibility feedback on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with risky drinking.

DOI 10.17061/phrp2641645
Co-authors Kypros Kypri, A Dunlop, Rodney Scott, Natalie Johnson, Joanna Latter, John Attia, Mark Mcevoy
2016 Ezard N, Dunlop A, Clifford B, Bruno R, Carr A, Bissaker A, Lintzeris N, 'Study protocol: a dose-escalating, phase-2 study of oral lisdexamfetamine in adults with methamphetamine dependence', BMC Psychiatry, 16 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-1141-x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Larance B, Bruno R, Lintzeris N, Degenhardt L, Black E, Brown A, et al., 'Development of a brief tool for monitoring aberrant behaviours among patients receiving long-term opioid therapy: The Opioid-Related Behaviours In Treatment (ORBIT) scale', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 159 42-52 (2016) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: Early identification of problems is essential in minimising the unintended consequences of opioid therapy. This study aimed to develop a b... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: Early identification of problems is essential in minimising the unintended consequences of opioid therapy. This study aimed to develop a brief scale that identifies and quantifies recent aberrant behaviour among diverse patient populations receiving long-term opioid treatment. Method: 40 scale items were generated via literature review and expert panel (N= 19) and tested in surveys of: (i) N= 41 key experts, and (ii) N= 426 patients prescribed opioids >3 months (222 pain patients and 204 opioid substitution therapy (OST) patients). We employed item and scale psychometrics (exploratory factor analyses, confirmatory factor analyses and item-response theory statistics) to refine items to a brief scale. Results: Following removal of problematic items (poor retest-reliability or wording, semantic redundancy, differential item functioning, collinearity or rarity) iterative factor analytic procedures identified a 10-item unifactorial scale with good model fit in the total sample (N= 426; CFI = 0.981, TLI = 0.975, RMSEA = 0.057), and among pain (CFI = 0.969, TLI = 0.960, RMSEA = 0.062) and OST subgroups (CFI = 0.989, TFI = 0.986, RMSEA = 0.051). The 10 items provided good discrimination between groups, demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability (ICC 0.80, 95% CI 0.60-0.89; Cronbach's alpha = 0.89), were moderately correlated with related constructs, including opioid dependence (SDS), depression and stress (DASS subscales) and Social Relationships and Environment domains of the WHO-QoL, and had strong face validity among advising clinicians. Conclusions: The Opioid-Related Behaviours In Treatment (ORBIT) scale is brief, reliable and validated for use in diverse patient groups receiving opioids. The ORBIT has potential applications as a checklist to prompt clinical discussions and as a tool to quantify aberrant behaviour and assess change over time.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.11.026
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Bonevski B, Guillaumier A, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'An organisational change intervention for increasing the delivery of smoking cessation support in addiction treatment centres: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial', TRIALS, 17 (2016)
DOI 10.1186/s13063-016-1401-6
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski, Chris Paul, Catherine Deste, A Dunlop
2016 Nielsen S, Bruno R, Murnion B, Dunlop A, Degenhardt L, Demirkol A, et al., 'Treating codeine dependence with buprenorphine: Dose requirements and induction outcomes from a retrospective case series in New South Wales, Australia', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 70-75 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Codeine dependence is an emerging public health concern, yet no studies have specifical... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Codeine dependence is an emerging public health concern, yet no studies have specifically examined the treatment of codeine dependence. Given the lower potency of codeine it cannot be assumed that buprenorphine dose requirements for heroin dependence will generalise to codeine. This is the first study to examine buprenorphine treatment for codeine dependence.Design and Methods: Retrospective case series of 19 codeine-dependent treatment entrants who received sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment through six specialist inpatient and outpatient treatment centres. Baseline codeine doses and buprenorphine dose at days 7 and 28 were collected, in addition to details on general demographics, pain and mental health, substance use and outcomes after 28 days of buprenorphine treatment.Results: A significant linear relationship was found between initial codeine dose and dose of buprenorphine given at days 7 and 28 for the codeine dose range of 50-960 mg day-1 (mean: 564 mg; 95% confidence interval 431-696 mg). Median buprenorphine dose was 12.0 mg (interquartile range 9.5 mg, range 4-32 mg) at day 7 and 16.0 mg (interquartile range 13.5 mg, range 4-32 mg) at day 28. Buprenorphine doses received were markedly higher than estimated codeine doses based on standard dose conversion tables.Discussion and Conclusions: With increasing presentations relating to codeine dependence, these findings provide important guidance to clinicians. Buprenorphine doses were consistently higher than doses estimated based on the dose of codeine consumed, and were comparable with doses used in the treatment of dependence with heroin and more potent prescription opioids. [Nielsen S, Bruno R, Murnion B, Dunlop A, Degenhardt L, Demirkol A, Muhleisen P, Lintzeris N. Treating codeine dependence with buprenorphine: Dose requirements and induction outcomes from a retrospective case series in New South Wales, Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12315
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Wilson AJ, Bonevski B, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., ''The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings', Drug and Alcohol Review, 35 92-101 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from th... [more]

© 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: The aim of this study was to explore beliefs about tobacco dependence treatment from the perspective of staff and clients in addiction treatment settings.Design and Methods: A qualitative study was conducted between August and November 2013 using grounded theory methodology. Participants were recruited from four government-funded drug and alcohol services in a regional centre of New South Wales, Australia. Treatment centre staff (n=10) were interviewed using a semistructured interview guide and two focus groups (n=5 and n=6) were held with clients of the same treatment centres.Results: Both clients and staff wish to do more about tobacco use in addiction treatment services, but a number of barriers were identified. Staff barriers included lack of time, tobacco-permissive organisational culture, lack of enforcement of smoke-free policies, beliefs that tobacco is not a treatment priority for clients and that clients need to smoke as a coping strategy, and perceptions that treatment was either ineffective or not used by clients. Clients reported smoking as a habit and for enjoyment or stress relief, seeing staff smoking, nicotine replacement therapy unaffordability and perceptions that nicotine replacement therapy may be addictive, and inability to relate to telephone cessation counselling as barriers to quitting smoking.Discussion and Conclusions: Client and staff perceptions and attitudes about the treatment of tobacco, particularly those relating telephone support and nicotine replacement therapy, provided information, which will inform the design of smoking cessation programs for addiction treatment populations. [Wilson AJ, Bonevski B., Dunlop A., Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F., Walsberger S., Farrell M., Kelly PJ, Guillaumier A. 'The lesser of two evils': A qualitative study of staff and client experiences and beliefs about addressing tobacco in addiction treatment settings. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015].

DOI 10.1111/dar.12322
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Wilson, Flora Tzelepis, Billie Bonevski
2016 Grebely J, Alavi M, Micallef M, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, Phung N, et al., 'Treatment for hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs attending opioid substitution treatment and community health clinics: The ETHOS Study', Addiction, 111 311-319 (2016) [C1]

© 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.Aims: To estimate adherence and response to therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among people with a history of injecti... [more]

© 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.Aims: To estimate adherence and response to therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among people with a history of injecting drug use. A secondary aim was to identify predictors of HCV treatment response. Design: Prospective cohort recruited between 2009 and 2012. Participants were treated with peg-interferon alfa-2a/ribavirin for 24 (genotypes 2/3, G2/3) or 48weeks (genotype 1, G1). Setting: Six opioid substitution treatment (OST) clinics, two community health centres and one Aboriginal community-controlled health organization providing drug treatment services in New South Wales, Australia. Participants: Among 415 people with a history of injecting drug use and chronic HCV assessed by a nurse, 101 were assessed for treatment outcomes (21% female). Measurements: Study outcomes were treatment adherence and sustained virological response (SVR, undetectable HCV RNA >24weeks post-treatment). Findings: Among 101 treated, 37% (n=37) had recently injected drugs (past 6months) and 62% (n=63) were receiving OST. Adherence =80% was 86% (n=87). SVR was 74% (75 of 101), with no difference observed by sex (males: 76%, females: 67%, P=0.662). In adjusted analysis, age <35 (versus =45years) [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=5.06, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.47, 17.40] and on-treatment adherence =80% independently predicted SVR (aOR=19.41, 95% CI=3.61, 104.26]. Recent injecting drug use at baseline was not associated with SVR. Conclusions: People with a history of injecting drug use and chronic hepatitis C virus attending opioid substitution treatment and community health clinics can achieve adherence and responses to interferon-based therapy similar to other populations, despite injecting drugs at baseline. Younger age and adherence are predictive of improved response to hepatitis C virus therapy.

DOI 10.1111/add.13197
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 11
Co-authors A Dunlop
2016 Holliday SM, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson KM, Dunlop AJ, van Driel ML, et al., 'The pattern of anxiolytic and hypnotic management by Australian general practice trainees.', Drug and alcohol review, (2016)
Co-authors Christopher Oldmeadow, A Dunlop, Parker Magin
2016 Scott AJ, Dunlop AJ, Brown A, Sadler C, Isbister GK, 'The prevalence of QT prolongation in a population of patients with substance use disorders.', Drug and alcohol review, (2016)
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister, A Dunlop
2016 Dunlop AJ, 'Commentary on Smith et al. (2016): Gabapentin-looks like a drug that can be misused..., probably is a drug that can be misused', ADDICTION, 111 1175-1176 (2016)
DOI 10.1111/add.13416
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Attia J, Saitz R, et al., 'Effect of telephone follow-up on retention and balance in an alcohol intervention trial', Preventive Medicine Reports, 2 746-749 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 The Authors.Objectives: Telephone follow-up is not currently recommended as a strategy to improve retention in randomized trials. The aims of this study were to estimate t... [more]

© 2015 The Authors.Objectives: Telephone follow-up is not currently recommended as a strategy to improve retention in randomized trials. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of telephone follow-up on retention, identify participant characteristics predictive of questionnaire completion during or after telephone follow-up, and estimate the effect of including participants who provided follow-up data during or after telephone follow-up on balance between randomly allocated groups in a trial estimating the effect of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention on alcohol consumption in hospital outpatients with hazardous or harmful drinking. Method: Trial participants were followed up 6. months after randomization (June-December 2013) using e-mails containing a hyperlink to a web-based questionnaire when possible and by post otherwise. Telephone follow-up was attempted after two written reminders and participants were invited to complete the questionnaire by telephone when contact was made. Results: Retention before telephone follow-up was 62.1% (520/837) and 82.8% (693/837) afterward: an increase of 20.7% (173/837). Therefore, 55% (95% CI 49%-60%) of the 317 participants who had not responded after two written reminders responded during or after the follow-up telephone call. Age. <. 55. years, a higher AUDIT-C score and provision of a mobile/cell phone number were predictive of questionnaire completion during or after telephone follow-up. Balance between randomly allocated groups was present before and after inclusion of participants who completed the questionnaire during or after telephone follow-up. Conclusion: Telephone follow-up improved retention in this randomized trial without affecting balance between the randomly allocated groups.

DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.08.016
Citations Scopus - 1
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, Patrick Mcelduff, Natalie Johnson, Kypros Kypri, A Dunlop, John Attia, Joanna Latter
2015 Marshall AD, Micallef M, Erratt A, Telenta J, Treloar C, Everingham H, et al., 'Liver disease knowledge and acceptability of non-invasive liver fibrosis assessment among people who inject drugs in the drug and alcohol setting: The LiveRLife Study', International Journal of Drug Policy, 26 984-991 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.07.002
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 2
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Pienaar K, Fraser S, Kokanovic R, Moore D, Treloar C, Dunlop A, 'New narratives, new selves: Complicating addiction in online alcohol and other drug resources', Addiction Research and Theory, 23 499-509 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved.Within the expansive qualitative literature on alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, knowledge of lived experiences of AOD addiction is lim... [more]

© 2015 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved.Within the expansive qualitative literature on alcohol and other drug (AOD) use, knowledge of lived experiences of AOD addiction is limited. Much of the existing scholarship reifies addiction as a calamitous state, and pathologises those believed to be experiencing it. Such research discounts the many ways people live with regular AOD use and is unable to tell us much about how addiction emerges through, rather than precedes, peoples experiences and understandings of it. This article draws on the theoretical literature on the production of social problems and the concept of "ontological politics" to introduce an innovative approach to understanding lived experiences of AOD addiction. Applying this literature to a critical analysis of personal narratives from two Australian AOD websites, we demonstrate how addiction is conceived narrowly in these narratives as a disorder of compulsion, amenable to treatment. Not only does this conception reproduce unhelpful assumptions about addiction, it also reifies it as a stable, unified entity, the boundaries of which are fixed. Against this familiar account, we conceive addiction as an emergent, fiercely contested phenomenon, constituted in part through the very measures designed to treat it. This shift in focus allows an innovation in engaging with addiction, which is being pursued in a new Australian research project: the development of a public website presenting lived experiences of addiction that will be (1) a means of challenging existing public discourses, and (2) an intervention in the social production of addiction. The article concludes by considering the politics of this approach and how it might reshape addiction.

DOI 10.3109/16066359.2015.1040002
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Keats J, Micallef M, Grebely J, Hazelwood S, Everingham H, Shrestha N, et al., 'Assessment and delivery of treatment for hepatitis C virus infection in an opioid substitution treatment clinic with integrated peer-based support in Newcastle, Australia', International Journal of Drug Policy, 26 999-1006 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWID), the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is high; however HCV treatment uptake remains low. New m... [more]

© 2015 Elsevier B.V.Background: Among people who inject drugs (PWID), the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is high; however HCV treatment uptake remains low. New models of care are needed to address the growing burden of HCV-related disease in PWID and to understand the barriers to assessment and treatment of HCV. This study evaluated assessment and treatment for HCV infection among PWID attending an opioid substitution treatment (OST) clinic with an integrated peer support worker model. Methods: Clients with a history of IDU and chronic HCV infection, attending the Newcastle Pharmacotherapy Service, Newcastle Australia, were recruited as part of a multisite prospective observational study (the ETHOS Cohort). Additional chart review was conducted for clients not enrolled in the ETHOS Cohort. A peer support worker was introduced to complement and extend services offered by the clinical team. Client contacts and assessments with a nurse and/or peer worker were evaluated, including those who commenced HCV treatment. Results: A total of 1447 clients attended the OST service during February 2009 and June 2014. Of these, 378 (26%) were assessed by a nurse and 242 (17%) by a clinician. HCV treatment was commenced by 20 (5%) participants and 15 (75%) achieved a sustained virological response (SVR). During May 2009 and July 2011, 332 nurse contacts and 726 peer worker contacts were evaluated. The nurse-led contacts were related to HCV treatment (50%) and review of pathology tests (34%), whereas peer worker contacts included discussion about HCV treatment (75%), education, counselling and/or support (53%) and general discussion about HCV infection (59%). Conclusion: These data demonstrate that peer support workers facilitate broader discussion about HCV treatment, education and/or support, allowing nurses to focus on HCV-related assessment and treatment. HCV treatment uptake was very low in this cohort, but SVR was high. The integration of peer support workers in treatment programs within OST clinics may address barriers to HCV care, but further studies are needed to assess their impact on assessment and treatment outcomes.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.07.006
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 4
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Alavi M, Micallef M, Fortier E, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, Day CA, et al., 'Effect of treatment willingness on specialist assessment and treatment uptake for hepatitis C virus infection among people who use drugs: The ETHOS study', Journal of Viral Hepatitis, 22 914-925 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Among people who inject drugs (PWID) with chronic HCV, the association between HCV treatment willingness and intent, and HCV specialist assessment an... [more]

© 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.Among people who inject drugs (PWID) with chronic HCV, the association between HCV treatment willingness and intent, and HCV specialist assessment and treatment were evaluated. The Enhancing Treatment for Hepatitis C in Opioid Substitution Settings (ETHOS) is a prospective observational cohort. Recruitment was through six opioid substitution treatment clinics, two community health centres and one Aboriginal community controlled health organisation in Australia. Analyses were performed using logistic regression. Among 415 participants (mean age 41 years, 71% male), 67% were 'definitely willing' to receive HCV treatment and 70% reported plans to initiate therapy 12 months postenrolment. Those definitely willing to receive HCV treatment were more likely to undergo specialist assessment (64% vs 32%, P < 0.001) and initiate therapy (36% vs 9%, P < 0.001), compared to those with lower treatment willingness. Those with early HCV treatment plans were more likely to undergo specialist assessment (65% vs 27%, P < 0.001) and initiate therapy (36% vs 5%, P < 0.001), compared to those without early plans. In adjusted analyses, HCV treatment willingness independently predicted specialist assessment (aOR 3.06, 95% CI 1.90, 4.94) and treatment uptake (aOR 4.33, 95% CI 2.14, 8.76). In adjusted analysis, having early HCV treatment plans independently predicted specialist assessment (aOR 4.38, 95% CI 2.63, 7.29) and treatment uptake (aOR 9.79, 95% CI 3.70, 25.93). HCV treatment willingness was high and predicted specialist assessment and treatment. Strategies for enhanced HCV care should be developed with an initial focus on people willing to receive treatment and to increase treatment willingness among those less willing.

DOI 10.1111/jvh.12415
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 5
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Perry N, Newman LK, Hunter M, Dunlop A, 'Improving antenatal risk assessment in women exposed to high risks', CLINICAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY, 20 84-105 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1177/1359104513499355
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Mick Hunter, A Dunlop
2015 Fortier E, Alavi M, Micallef M, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, Day CA, et al., 'The effect of social functioning and living arrangement on treatment intent, specialist assessment and treatment uptake for hepatitis C virus infection among people with a history of injecting drug use: The ETHOS study', International Journal of Drug Policy, 26 1094-1102 (2015) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.06.001
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Nielsen S, Murnion B, Dunlop A, Degenhardt L, Demirkol A, Muhleisen P, Lintzeris N, 'Comparing treatment-seeking codeine users and strong opioid users: Findings from a novel case series', Drug and Alcohol Review, 34 304-311 (2015) [C1]

© 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Few studies have described those seeking treatment for codeine dependence. This study a... [more]

© 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.Introduction and Aims: Few studies have described those seeking treatment for codeine dependence. This study aimed to compare patients presenting for treatment where either codeine or a strong pharmaceutical opioid (oxycodone or morphine) was the principal drug of concern to understand if codeine users may have unique treatment needs. Design and Methods: Retrospective case review of 135 patients from three geographical areas in New South Wales, Australia. Cases where the principal drug of concern was codeine (n=53) or a strong pharmaceutical opioid (oxycodone or morphine, n=82) were compared. Differences in demographic characteristics, pain history, mental health, substance use history and, subsequently, the treatment that was received were examined. Results: People whose principal drug of concern was codeine were more likely to be female (66% vs. 37%, P<0.001), employed (43% vs. 22%, P<0.01) and use only one pharmaceutical opioid (91% vs. 49%, P<0.001). There was no difference in age between the codeine group (mean 38.6 years) and the strong opioid group (39.3 years). Opioid substitution therapy was the most common treatment received by both groups although codeine patients were more likely to be treated with buprenorphine than methadone (odds ratio=7.7, 95% confidence interval 2.2-27.2, P<0.001) and more likely to attempt withdrawal (odds ratio=2.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-5.3, P=0.010). Discussion and Conclusions: There are important differences between codeine-dependent patients and strong prescription opioid-dependent patients. Further work should explore the outcomes of withdrawal versus maintenance treatment for codeine users.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12224
Citations Scopus - 10Web of Science - 9
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Holliday S, Morgan S, Tapley A, Dunlop A, Henderson K, van Driel M, et al., 'The Pattern of Opioid Management by Australian General Practice Trainees', Pain Medicine (United States), 16 1720-1731 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine.Objective: With escalating opioid prescribing come individual and public health harms. To inform quality improvement measures, understand... [more]

© 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine.Objective: With escalating opioid prescribing come individual and public health harms. To inform quality improvement measures, understanding of opioid prescribing is essential. We aimed to establish consultation-level prevalence and associations of opioid prescribing. Design: A cross-sectional secondary analysis from a longitudinal multisite cohort study of general practitioner (GP) vocational trainees: "Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training." Setting: Four of Australia's seventeen GP Regional Training Providers, during 2010-13. Subjects: GP trainees. Methods: Practice and trainee demographic data were collected as well as patient, clinical and educational data of 60 consecutive consultations of each trainee, each training term. Outcome factors were any opioid analgesic prescription and initial opioid analgesic prescription for a specific problem for the first time. Results: Overall, 645 trainees participated. Opioids comprised 4.3% prescriptions provided for 3.8% of patients. Most frequently prescribed were codeine (39.9%) and oxycodone (33.4%). Prescribing was for acute pain (29.3%), palliative care (2.6%) or other indications (68.1%). Most prescribing involved repeat prescriptions for pre-existing problems (62.7% of total). Other associations included older patients; prescriber and patient male gender; Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander status; rural and disadvantaged locations; longer consultations; and generation of referrals, follow-up, and imaging requests. Opioid initiation was more likely for new patients with new problems, but otherwise associations were similar. Trainees rarely reported addiction risk-mitigation strategies. Conclusions: Most opioids were prescribed as maintenance therapy for non-cancer pain. Demographic associations with opioid analgesic prescribing resemble those presenting for opioid dependency treatment. Our findings should inform measures by regulators and medical educators supporting multimodal pain management.

DOI 10.1111/pme.12820
Citations Scopus - 2Web of Science - 3
Co-authors A Dunlop, Parker Magin, Christopher Oldmeadow
2015 Lintzeris N, Copeland J, Dunlop A, McGregor IS, Allsop DJ, 'Cannabinoid Replacement Therapy (CRT): Nabiximols (Sativex) as a Novel Treatment for Cannabis Withdrawal', Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 97 571-574 (2015) [C1]

© 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.Cannabis is a common recreational drug that is generally considered to have low addictive potential. However, a... [more]

© 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.Cannabis is a common recreational drug that is generally considered to have low addictive potential. However, an increasing number of cannabis users are seeking treatment for dependence on the drug. There is interest in using agonist (substitution) pharmacotherapies to treat cannabis dependence and here we outline a novel approach involving a buccal spray (nabiximols) that contains tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). We review recent research with nabiximols and highlight findings relevant to clinical practice.

DOI 10.1002/cpt.109
Citations Scopus - 8Web of Science - 8
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Burns L, Breen C, Dunlop AJ, 'Prevention of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders must include maternal treatment', Medical Journal of Australia, 200 392 (2014) [C3]
DOI 10.5694/mja13.00019
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Allsop DJ, Dunlop AJ, Sadler C, Rivas GR, McGregor LS, Copeland J, 'Changes in cigarette and alcohol use during cannabis abstinence', DRUG AND ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE, 138 54-60 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.01.022
Citations Scopus - 13Web of Science - 13
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Latter J, McElduff P, Saunders JB, Saitz R, et al., 'Prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in hospital outpatients', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 144 270-273 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalen... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.Background: Few studies have examined the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use in the hospital outpatient setting. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use among patients attending a broad range of outpatient clinics at a large public hospital in Australia. Methods: Adult hospital outpatients were invited to complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Consumption questions (AUDIT-C) using an iPad as part of a randomised trial testing the efficacy of alcohol electronic screening and brief intervention. Unhealthy alcohol use was defined as an AUDIT-C score =5 among men and =4 among women. Results: Sixty percent (3616/6070) of invited hospital outpatients consented, of whom 89% (3206/3616) provided information on their alcohol consumption (either reported they had not consumed any alcohol in the last 12 months or completed the AUDIT-C). The prevalence of unhealthy alcohol use was 34.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.0-36.3%). The prevalence among men aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years and 60 years and older, was 74.4% (95% CI: 68.4-80.4%), 54.3% (95% CI: 48.7-59.8%), 44.1% (95% CI: 39.9-48.3%), and 27.0% (95% CI: 23.6-30.4%), respectively (43.1% overall; 95% CI: 40.8-45.5%). The prevalence among women aged 18-24 years, 25-39 years, 40-59 years, and 60 years and older, was 48.6% (95% CI: 39.2-58.1%), 36.9% (95% CI: 31.2-42.6%), 25.2% (95% CI: 21.5-29.0%) and 14.5% (95% CI: 11.7-17.3%), respectively (24.9% overall; 95% CI: 22.7-27.1%). Conclusion: A large number of hospital outpatients who are not currently seeking treatment for their drinking could benefit from effective intervention in this setting.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.08.014
Citations Scopus - 5Web of Science - 4
Co-authors A Dunlop, Kypros Kypri, Luke Wolfenden, John Attia, Natalie Johnson, Joanna Latter, Patrick Mcelduff
2014 Allsop DJ, Copeland J, Lintzeris N, Dunlop AJ, Montebello M, Sadler C, et al., 'Nabiximols as an Agonist Replacement Therapy During Cannabis Withdrawal A Randomized Clinical Trial', JAMA PSYCHIATRY, 71 281-291 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.3947
Citations Scopus - 39Web of Science - 37
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Treloar C, Rance J, Haber P, Bath N, Day C, Dore G, et al., 'How to build trustworthy hepatitis C services in an opioid treatment clinic? A qualitative study of clients and health workers in a co-located setting', International Journal of Drug Policy, 25 865-870 (2014) [C1]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V.Background: Given the increasing burden of hepatitis C (HCV) related liver disease, innovative health care models are required to extend the reach of HCV care... [more]

© 2014 Elsevier B.V.Background: Given the increasing burden of hepatitis C (HCV) related liver disease, innovative health care models are required to extend the reach of HCV care and treatment. Opioid substitution treatment (OST) clinics are places of high HCV prevalence. The OST clinic is a complex environment, quite distinct to other health care settings, with punitive regulations and practices, and a client population likely to be mistrustful of systems of authority. Nonetheless, trust is widely documented as essential to effective therapeutic encounters. This paper examines what is required to develop a trustworthy service in a place, the OST clinic, described by some critics as a site of "social control". Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with 57 clients and 19 staff from four NSW pilot clinics participating in the Australian ETHOS study. Results: Interview data were examined using Hall's framework of trust, involving five principle domains: fidelity, competence, honest, confidentiality and global trust. 'Honesty' was found to be key to participants' establishing trust in the co-located service and its staff. However, the clinic site was also found to be a place of rationed trust, in which the themes of OST as "ruling peoples' lives" and the fear of repercussions resulting from perceived transgressions against clinic rules, threatened to over-ride or undermine the development of trust in HCV services. Client participants described trusting health workers "to a point". They expressed concerns about the fidelity of co-located HCV and OST services and described fears of "institutionalised lies" and breaches of confidentiality. Anxieties around the latter revealed a sense of "us and them" held by some clients, one in which health workers were perceived to "stick together" by putting their own interests before those of the clients. Discussion: Although the co-location of HCV and opioid treatments makes intuitive policy sense, HCV health workers in the OST space may be seen as representatives of a deeply mistrusted system. For the effective development of a trustworthy HCV care service, policy and practice activities are required to engender trust through clearly articulated explanations of service boundaries and the promotion of "success stories" through trusted peer networks.

DOI 10.1016/j.drugpo.2014.01.011
Citations Scopus - 9
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Ryan A, Holmes J, Hunt V, Dunlop A, Mammen K, Holland R, et al., 'Validation and implementation of the Australian Treatment Outcomes Profile in specialist drug and alcohol settings', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 33 33-42 (2014) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12083
Citations Scopus - 18Web of Science - 15
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Newman L, Perry N, Brown A, Murray E, Byrne J, Dunlop A, 'PARENTING WITH FEELING: GROUP PARENTING INTERVENTION FOR SUBSTANCE DEPENDENT PARENTS AND THEIR INFANTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 33 48-48 (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Johnson NA, Kypri K, Saunders JB, Saitz R, Attia J, Dunlop A, et al., 'The hospital outpatient alcohol project (HOAP): protocol for an individually randomized, parallel-group superiority trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention versus screening alone for unhealthy alcohol use.', Addict Sci Clin Pract, 8 14 (2013) [C3]
DOI 10.1186/1940-0640-8-14
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors A Dunlop, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia, Luke Wolfenden, Natalie Johnson, Kypros Kypri
2013 Magin P, Holliday S, Dunlop A, Ewald B, Dunbabin J, Henry J, et al., 'Discomfort sharing the general practice waiting room with mentally ill patients: a cross-sectional study', FAMILY PRACTICE, 30 190-196 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cms058
Co-authors Ben Ewald, A Dunlop, Parker Magin
2013 Holliday S, Hayes C, Dunlop A, 'Opioid use in chronic non-cancer pain Part 2: Prescribing issues and alternatives', Australian Family Physician, 42 104-111 (2013) [C2]

Background: Managing pain requires time and effort to attend to its biopsychosocial characteristics. This requires proper planning and a whole-of-practice approach. Objective: Thi... [more]

Background: Managing pain requires time and effort to attend to its biopsychosocial characteristics. This requires proper planning and a whole-of-practice approach. Objective: This article describes how to prepare your practice for quality chronic pain care, and details a non-judgemental and effective management approach, including the minimisation of opioid harms. Discussion: It is helpful to have a consistent, whole-of-practice approach when a patient new to the practice presents with a compelling case for opioids. Assessing patients with chronic pain includes a full medical history and detailed examination according to a biopsychosocial approach and applying 'universal precautions' to make a misuse risk assessment. A management plan should consider a range of non-opioid modalities, with a focus on active rather than passive strategies. Integrated multidisciplinary pain services have been shown to improve pain and function outcomes for patients with complex chronic pain issues, but access is often limited. Time-limited opioid use is recommended with initial and regular monitoring, including pain and function scores, urine toxicology, compliance with regulatory surveillance systems and assessment for adverse reactions and drug related aberrant behaviours. When ceasing prescribing, opioids should be weaned slowly, except in response to violence or criminal activity.

Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Holliday S, Hayes C, Dunlop A, 'Opioid use in chronic non-cancer pain: Part 1: Known knowns and known unknowns', Australian Family Physician, 42 98-102 (2013) [C2]

Background: Opioids have a critical, time-limited role in our management of acute and terminal pain and an open-ended role in our management of opioid dependency. They also have a... [more]

Background: Opioids have a critical, time-limited role in our management of acute and terminal pain and an open-ended role in our management of opioid dependency. They also have a use in the management of chronic non-cancer pain. Objective: To provide an understanding of what is known, and what is not known, about the use of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain using an evidence-based approach. Discussion: For chronic non-cancer pain, the evidence base for the long-term use of opiates is mediocre, with weak support for minimal improvements in pain measures and little or no evidence for functional restoration. Much research and professional education in this field has been underwritten by commercial interests. Escalating the prescribing of opioids has been repeatedly linked to a myriad of individual and public harms, including overdose deaths. Many patients on long-term opioids may never be able to taper off them, despite their associated toxicities and lack of efficacy. Prescribers need familiarity with good opioid care practices for evidencebased indications. Outside these areas, in chronic non-cancer pain, the general practitioner needs to use time and diligence to implement risk mitigation strategies. However, if a GP believes chronic non-cancer pain management requires opioids, prescribing must be both selective and cautious to allow patients to maintain, or regain, control of their pain management.

Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 7
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Lintzeris N, Leung SY, Dunlop AJ, Larance B, White N, Rivas GR, et al., 'A randomised controlled trial of sublingual buprenorphine-naloxone film versus tablets in the management of opioid dependence', DRUG AND ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE, 131 119-126 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.12.009
Citations Scopus - 21Web of Science - 14
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Ling S, Curtis J, Brighton R, Dunlop A, 'An examination of barriers to Nurse Practitioner endorsement in senior rural drug and alcohol nurses in New South Wales', COLLEGIAN, 20 79-86 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1016/j.colegn.2012.03.010
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 McKetin R, Dunlop AJ, Holland RM, Sutherland RA, Baker AL, Salmon AM, Hudson SL, 'Treatment outcomes for methamphetamine users receiving outpatient counselling from the Stimulant Treatment Program in Australia', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 32 80-87 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2012.00471.x
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 5
Co-authors Amanda Baker, A Dunlop
2013 Alavi M, Grebely J, Micallef M, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, Day CA, et al., 'Assessment and Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among People Who Inject Drugs in the Opioid Substitution Setting: ETHOS Study', CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES, 57 S62-S69 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1093/cid/cit305
Citations Scopus - 51Web of Science - 48
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Holliday S, Magin P, Oldmeadow C, Attia J, Dunbabin J, Henry J, et al., 'An examination of the influences on New South Wales general practitioners regarding the provision of opioid substitution therapy', Drug and Alcohol Review, 32 495-503 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12046
Citations Scopus - 7Web of Science - 4
Co-authors Parker Magin, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia, A Dunlop
2013 Nielsen S, Larance B, Lintzeris N, Black E, Bruno R, Murnion B, et al., 'Correlates of pain in an in-treatment sample of opioid-dependent people', Drug and Alcohol Review, 32 489-494 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/dar.12041
Citations Web of Science - 3
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Nielsen S, Larance B, Lintzeris N, Black E, Bruno R, Murnion B, et al., 'Correlates of pain in an in-treatment sample of opioid-dependent people', Drug and Alcohol Review, 32 489-494 (2013)

Introduction and Aims: The limited literature on pain in opioid-treatment samples indicates that it is highly prevalent. Understanding the implications of pain on treatment outcom... [more]

Introduction and Aims: The limited literature on pain in opioid-treatment samples indicates that it is highly prevalent. Understanding the implications of pain on treatment outcomes is important, particularly in light of ageing opioid-treatment cohorts. This study explores correlates of pain, including aberrant behaviours related to prescribed opioids. Our hypothesis is that pain may increase aberrant opioid-related behaviours, including illicit substance use, among opioid-dependent people. Design and Methods: We examined pain in methadone or buprenorphine patients (n=141) from three treatment services. Measures included basic demographics, Brief Pain Inventory, general mental health, physical health and quality of life measures, pain history and treatments, and an aberrant opioid-related behaviour scale. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine correlates of pain. Results: Forty percent reported current pain, measured with the first question of the Brief Pain Inventory. Correlates of pain were depression ratings [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04, 4.83], anxiety ratings (adjusted OR 4.29, 95% CI 1.88, 9.80) and self-reported health ratings (adjusted OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.16, 0.76). Contrary to our hypothesis, pain was not associated with greater use of illicit opioids, nor any aberrant opioid-related behaviours. Pain was comparable among methadone and buprenorphine patients. Discussion and Conclusions: The lack of association with pain and aberrant behaviours suggest that it should not be assumed that those in opioid treatment misuse medications in response to pain. The high prevalence of depression/anxiety symptoms indicates a need for further work with larger samples to explore pain and co-morbidity among opioid-dependent people. [Nielsen S, Larance B, Lintzeris N, Black E, Bruno R, Murnion B, Dunlop A, Degenhardt L. Correlates of pain in an in-treatment sample of opioid-dependent people. Drug Alcohol Rev 2013;32:489-494] © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

DOI 10.1111/dar.12041
Citations Scopus - 4
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Holliday S, Magin P, Dunbabin J, Oldmeadow C, Henry J-M, Lintzeris N, et al., 'An Evaluation of the Prescription of Opioids for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain by Australian General Practitioners', PAIN MEDICINE, 14 62-74 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2012.01527.x
Citations Scopus - 12Web of Science - 10
Co-authors A Dunlop, Parker Magin, Christopher Oldmeadow, John Attia
2012 Holliday SM, Magin PJ, Dunbabin JS, Ewald BD, Henry J-M, Goode SM, et al., 'Waiting room ambience and provision of opioid substitution therapy in general practice', Medical Journal of Australia, 196 391-394 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 6Web of Science - 6
Co-authors Parker Magin, A Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2012 Dunlop AJ, 'Counselling during substitution treatment: Not enough is too much?', Addiction, 107 954-956 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Baker AL, Thornton LK, Hides L, Dunlop AJ, 'Treatment of cannabis use among people with psychotic disorders: A critical review of randomised controlled trials', Current Pharmaceutical Design, 18 4923-4937 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 9Web of Science - 8
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
2012 Calver L, Dunlop AJ, Isbister GK, 'Individual patient assessment of methadone-induced QT prolongation with digital holter recording', Journal of Addiction Medicine, 6 92-93 (2012) [C3]
Citations Scopus - 4Web of Science - 3
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister, Leonie Calver, A Dunlop
2011 Miller P, Dunlop AJ, 'Rhetoric, reality and research: What they mean for achieving the best possible treatment system for addiction-related problems', International Journal of Drug Policy, 22 196-197 (2011) [C3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Burns L, Black E, Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Elliott E, Shakeshaft A, Dunlop AJ, 'Geographic and maternal characteristics associated with alcohol use in pregnancy', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 35 1-8 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 14Web of Science - 9
Co-authors Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton, A Dunlop
2011 Dunlop AJ, 'Harms: How much, how many, how often?', Drug and Alcohol Review, 30 332-333 (2011) [C3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00286.x
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2010 Powers JR, Loxton DJ, Burns LA, Shakeshaft A, Elliott EJ, Dunlop AJ, 'Assessing pregnant women's compliance with different alcohol guidelines: An 11-year prospective study', Medical Journal of Australia, 192 690-693 (2010) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 15Web of Science - 15
Co-authors A Dunlop, Jenny Powers, Deborah Loxton
2010 Hudson SL, Dunlop A, 'ADOPTING A STEPPED CARE APPROACH IN WORKING WITH STIMULANT USERS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 5-6 (2010)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2010 Everingham H, Hazelwood S, Tierney R, Grebely J, Gillman A, Crawford S, et al., 'PRESENTER 4: PEER-BASED SUPPORT FOR HCV ASSESSMENT AT HUNTER PHARMACOTHERAPY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 22-22 (2010)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2010 Dunlop A, Ritter A, Templeman D, Berends L, Linzteris N, 'SYMPOSIUM - NATIONAL HOSPITALS AND HEALTHCARE REFORM AND DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT: THE GREAT LEAP FORWARD OR STUCK IN THE BACKBLOCKS?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 29 23-24 (2010)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Lee N, Pennay A, Hester R, Ferris J, Dunlop A, 'DOUBLE-BLIND PLACEBO-CONTROLLED PILOT TRIAL OF MODAFINIL FOR METHAMPHETAMINE WITHDRAWAL', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 28 A75-A75 (2009)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Pennay A, Lee N, Ferris J, Hester R, Dunlop A, 'TREATMENT FOR METHAMPHETAMINE WITHDRAWAL', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 28 A78-A78 (2009)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Higgs P, Jordens J, Maher L, Dunlop A, 'Vietnamese-Australian heroin users' perspectives on the role of the family in treatment', DRUGS-EDUCATION PREVENTION AND POLICY, 16 409-421 (2009)
DOI 10.1080/09687630802063623
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 3
Co-authors A Dunlop
2007 Dunlop A, 'Prenatal exposure to Drugs/Alcohol', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 26 685-685 (2007)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2007 Bell J, Shanahan M, Mutch C, Rea F, Ryan A, Batey R, et al., 'A randomized trial of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of observed versus unobserved administration of buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin dependence', ADDICTION, 102 1899-1907 (2007)
DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2007.01979.x
Citations Scopus - 59Web of Science - 50
Co-authors A Dunlop
2007 Nielsen S, Dietze P, Dunlop A, Muhleisen P, Lee N, Taylor D, 'Buprenorphine supply by community pharmacists in Victoria, Australia: Perceptions, experiences and key issues identified', Drug and Alcohol Review, 26 143-151 (2007)

Buprenorphine is dispensed primarily in community pharmacies in Victoria, with buprenorphine prescribing expanding nationally. The aim of this paper was to examine issues that aff... [more]

Buprenorphine is dispensed primarily in community pharmacies in Victoria, with buprenorphine prescribing expanding nationally. The aim of this paper was to examine issues that affect the delivery of buprenorphine in the community setting. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 282 pharmacies participating in the methadone and buprenorphine programme across Victoria. Dispensing pharmacists completed the survey, designed to canvass issues around buprenorphine diversion and other issues related to the programme. Themes from the results indicated that there was concern from the majority of pharmacies with the issue of the supervision of buprenorphine and diversion of dispensed doses. The rate of suspected diversion was 1.5 times per 100 doses per month or 33 times per 100 clients per month. Seventy-four per cent of pharmacists indicated that this was a negative aspect of buprenorphine treatment. Frequency of suspected and confirmed diversion was associated with the number of pharmacy clients. Pharmacists' perceptions of issues related to buprenorphine appeared to affect opinions of buprenorphine clients and the buprenorphine programme more generally. Pharmacists believe that a significant level of diversion is occurring. This finding warrants serious attention, particularly in light of the increasing use of buprenorphine nationally and internationally. © Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs.

DOI 10.1080/09595230601146645
Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors A Dunlop
2007 Nielsen S, Dietze P, Lee N, Dunlop A, Taylor D, 'Concurrent buprenorphine and benzodiazepines use and self-reported opioid toxicity in opioid substitution treatment', Addiction, 102 616-622 (2007)

Aims: To examine concurrent buprenorphine and benzodiazepine consumption and to compare opioid toxicity symptoms induced by methadone and buprenorphine, examining factors associat... [more]

Aims: To examine concurrent buprenorphine and benzodiazepine consumption and to compare opioid toxicity symptoms induced by methadone and buprenorphine, examining factors associated with the reporting of these symptoms. Design: Self-report cross-sectional survey. Setting: Five needle syringe programmes and five opioid substitution treatment services in Melbourne, Australia. Participants: A total of 250 people who had experience with methadone or buprenorphine. Eligibility criteria were current or previous methadone or buprenorphine use. Measurements: Structured questionnaire covering: demographic characteristics; current treatment and drug use; concurrent use of buprenorphine and benzodiazepines, including route of administration and source of medications; and opioid toxicity symptoms reported in association with methadone and buprenorphine consumption. Findings: Of those reporting buprenorphine use, two-thirds reported concurrent benzodiazepine use, with a median dose reported of 30 mg diazepam equivalents. A greater number of opioid toxicity symptoms were reported in relation to methadone consumption compared with buprenorphine. Those reporting opioid toxicity with buprenorphine were more likely to report intravenous use compared with those reporting opioid toxicity with methadone. Conclusions: The risk of opioid toxicity appeared greater with methadone compared with buprenorphine, despite high levels of benzodiazepine consumption and injection being reported in relation to buprenorphine use. The prevalence of buprenorphine injection and the normalization of methadone-induced sedation are two findings that merit further investigation. Establishing recommendations as to the safest and most effective way to manage benzodiazepine-using people in opioid substitution treatment is necessary for the optimization of treatment for opioid dependence in polydrug-using individuals. © 2007 The Authors.

DOI 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2006.01731.x
Citations Scopus - 50
Co-authors A Dunlop
2002 Lintzeris N, Dunlop A, Muhleisen P, Ritter A, 'Training primary health care professionals to prvide Buprenorphine and LAAM treatment', Substance Abuse, 23 245-254 (2002)

This paper describes the development and implementation of training programs for primary care medical practitioners and pharmacists in the delivery of buprenorphine and LAAM treat... [more]

This paper describes the development and implementation of training programs for primary care medical practitioners and pharmacists in the delivery of buprenorphine and LAAM treatment in the management of opiate dependence. Separate training programs were developed for each medication. Each training package included learning objectives, training materials, and assessment instruments. Findings of the evaluation of these initiatives and the subsequent Australian postregistration training program for buprenorphine are described. © 2002 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

DOI 10.1080/08897070209511497
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors A Dunlop
2002 Clark N, Lintzeris N, Gijsbers A, Whelan G, Dunlop A, Ritter A, Ling W, 'LAAM maintenance vs methadone maintenance for heroin dependence.', Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online), (2002)

BACKGROUND: LAAM and methadone are both full mu opiate agonists and have been shown to reduce dependence on heroin when given continuously under supervised dosing conditions. LAAM... [more]

BACKGROUND: LAAM and methadone are both full mu opiate agonists and have been shown to reduce dependence on heroin when given continuously under supervised dosing conditions. LAAM has a long duration of action requiring dosing every two or three days compared to methadone which requires daily dosing. LAAM is not as widely available internationally as methadone, and may be withdrawn from the market following ten cases of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and an association with QT prolongation. OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and acceptability of LAAM maintenance with methadone maintenance in the treatment of heroin dependence. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2000), PsycINFO (1887 to August 2000), EMBASE (January 1985 to August 2000), and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Issue 2 2000). In addition we hand searched NIDA monographs until August 2000 and searched reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and controlled prospective studies comparing LAAM and methadone maintenance for the treatment of heroin dependence and measuring outcomes of efficacy or acceptability were included. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Data on retention in treatment, heroin use, side-effects and mortality were collected by two reviewers independently. A meta-analysis was performed using RevMan. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. MAIN RESULTS: Eighteen studies, (15 RCTs, 3 Controlled prospective studies) met the inclusion criteria for the review. Three were excluded from the meta-analysis due to lack of data on retention, heroin use or mortality. Cessation of allocated medication (11 studies, 1473 participants) was greater with LAAM than with methadone, (RR 1.36, 95%CI 1.07-1.73, p=0.001, NNT=7.7 (or 8)). Non-abstinence was less with LAAM (5 studies, 983 participants; RR 0.81, 95%CI 0.72-0.91, p=0.0003, NNT=9.1 (or 10)). In 10 studies (1441 participants) there were 6 deaths from a range of causes, 5 in participants assigned to LAAM (RR 2.28 (95%CI 0.59-8.9, p=0.2). other relevant outcomes, such as quality of life and criminal activity could not be analysed because of lack of information in the primary studies. REVIEWER'S CONCLUSIONS: LAAM appears more effective than methadone at reducing heroin use. More LAAM patients than methadone ceased their allocated medication during the studies, but many transferred to methadone and so the significance of this is unclear. There was no difference in safety observed, although there was not enough evidence to comment on uncommon adverse events.

Citations Scopus - 30
Co-authors A Dunlop
2001 Higgs P, Maher L, Jordens J, Dunlop A, Sargent P, 'Harm reduction and drug users of Vietnamese ethnicity', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, 20 239-245 (2001)
DOI 10.1080/09595230120078603
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop
2001 Higgs P, Maher L, Jordens J, Dunlop A, Sargent P, 'Harm reduction and drug users of Vietnamese ethnicity', Drug and Alcohol Review, 20 239-245 (2001)
Citations Scopus - 15
Co-authors A Dunlop
1996 Lintzeris N, Holgate F, Dunlop A, 'Addressing dependent amphetamine use: A place for prescription', Drug and Alcohol Review, 15 189-195 (1996)

Amphetamines are among the most widely used of illicit drugs in Australia, and evidence documenting the occurrence of amphetamine-related harms, particularly among chronic regular... [more]

Amphetamines are among the most widely used of illicit drugs in Australia, and evidence documenting the occurrence of amphetamine-related harms, particularly among chronic regular users, is increasing, A review of contemporary Australian treatment approaches suggests that conventional modalities are unlikely to address the needs of a large proportion of dependent amphetamine users. This has prompted clinicians in Australia and the United Kingdom to commence treatment programmes incorporating substitution therapy. Despite the positive impressions of clinicians involved in these programmes, further research is required to establish the role and efficacy of such treatment approaches. Issues to be addressed in the establishment of a controlled study are examined.

Citations Scopus - 17
Co-authors A Dunlop
Fortier E, Alavi M, Bruneau J, Micallef M, Perram J, Sockalingam S, et al., 'Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Among People With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection and a History of Injecting Drug Use in New South Wales, Australia.', J Addict Med, 11 10-18
DOI 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000261
Co-authors A Dunlop
Show 72 more journal articles

Conference (70 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Dunlop A, et al., 'DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT CLINICIAN BARRIERS TO THE PROVISION OF REFERRAL TO TELEPHONE HELPLINES', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, A Dunlop, Jenny Bowman
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Wolfenden L, Bowman J, Dunlop A, et al., 'CLINICIAN PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE FOR MODIFIABLE BEHAVIOURAL HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOURS WITHIN SUBSTANCE USE TREATMENT SERVICES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors Luke Wolfenden, A Dunlop, Jenny Bowman
2016 Tremain D, Freund M, Wye P, Bowman J, Wolfenden L, Dunlop A, et al., 'INCREASING THE PROVISION OF PREVENTIVE CARE TO COMMUNITY DRUG AND ALCOHOL CLIENTS: A PILOT STUDY.', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Luke Wolfenden, Jenny Bowman
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Catherine Deste, Chris Paul, Billie Bonevski, Flora Tzelepis
2016 Guillaumier A, Bonevski B, Shakeshaft A, Farrell M, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'TOBACCO SMOKING CESSATION INTENTIONS AND PREFERENCES FOR QUIT SUPPORT AMONG CLIENTS OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Chris Paul, A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski
2016 Jackson M, Bowman J, Brown A, Lintzeris N, Clancy R, Bruno R, et al., 'KRONIC IN THE CLINIC: THE USE OF SYNTHETIC CANNABINOIDS BY NSW CANNABIS CLINIC CLIENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman
2016 Jackson M, Bowman J, Brown A, Lintzeris N, Clancy R, Bruno R, et al., 'MEDICINAL CANNABIS USE AND DRIVING BY CLIENTS OF NSW HEALTH CANNABIS CLINICS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2016)
Co-authors Jenny Bowman, A Dunlop, Richard Clancy
2015 Holliday S, Dunlop A, Hayes C, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, et al., 'THE EVALUATION OF A BRIEF EDUCATIONAL PAIN MANAGEMENT INTERVENTION AMONGST AUSTRALIAN GENERAL PRACTICE REGISTRARS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors A Dunlop, Parker Magin
2015 Allsop DJ, Dunlop A, Sadler C, Rivas G, Copeland J, 'Changes in cigarette and alcohol use during cannabis abstinence', Drug and Alcohol Dependence (2015) [E3]
DOI 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2014.09.031
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Grebely J, Dalgard O, Conway B, Foster G, Bruggmann P, Backmund M, et al., 'EFFICACY OF RESPONSE-GUIDED PEGYLATED INTERFERON AND RIBAVIRIN THERAPY FOR PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS WITH HCV GENOTYPE 2/3 INFECTION: THE ACTIVATE STUDY', JOURNAL OF HEPATOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Alavi M, Grebely J, Micallef M, Dunlop A, Balcomb A, Day C, et al., 'TREATMENT FOR HEPATITIS C VIRUS INFECTION AMONG PEOPLE WHO INJECT DRUGS IN THE OPIOID SUBSTITUTION SETTING: THE ETHOS STUDY', JOURNAL OF HEPATOLOGY (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Dunlop A, 'JAMES RANKIN ORATION: WHERE THE SPIRIT MEETS THE BONE: AN ADDICTION MEDICINE PERSPECTIVE ON DRUG AND ALCOHOL IN AUSTRALIA', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Byrne J, Perry N, Murray E, Symonds I, Dunlop A, 'A RETROSPECTIVE AUDIT OF THE DRUGS IN PREGNANCY SERVICE IN NEWCASTLE, NEW SOUTH WALES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors Ian Symonds, A Dunlop
2015 Jackson M, Bowman J, Holland R, Lintzeris N, Clancy R, Bruno R, et al., 'SYNTHETIC CANNABINOIDS: PREVALENCE, PATTERNS OF USE, MOTIVES AND EFFECTS IN TREATMENT SEEKING CANNABIS USERS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Richard Clancy, Jenny Bowman
2015 Nielsen S, Bruno R, Murnion B, Dunlop A, Degenhardt L, Demirkol A, et al., 'OPIOID PHARMACOTHERAPY DOSE REQUIREMENTS FOR OXYCODONE AND MORPHINE DEPENDENCE', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Nielsen S, Larance B, Lintzeris N, Holliday S, Vanderhaven M, Hordern A, et al., 'LONGER TERM OUTCOMES FOR PHARMACEUTICAL OPIOID DEPENDENCE: 12 MONTH FINDINGS FROM AN IN-TREATMENT COHORT', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Perry N, Dunlop A, Murray E, Brown A, Byrne J, Newman L, 'EMOTIONAL AVAILABILITY AND PARENTAL REFLECTIVE FUNCTIONING IN SUBSTANCE DEPENDENT PARENTS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2015 Winmill T, Brown A, Holland R, Williams P, Carnell J, Gardner L, et al., 'PATIENT PERSPECTIVES ON OPIATE SUBSTITUTION TREATMENT DURATION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2015) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Bonevski B, Wilson A, Dunlop A, Shakeshaft A, Tzelepis F, Walsberger S, et al., 'SMOKING CESSATION IN DRUG AND ALCOHOL TREATMENT SETTINGS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF STAFF AND CLIENT BARRIERS AND FACILITATORS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Flora Tzelepis, Amanda Wilson, A Dunlop, Billie Bonevski
2014 Holliday S, Magin P, Morgan S, Tapley A, Henderson K, Dunlop A, et al., 'WHICH, WHAT AND WHO: A DESCRIPTION OF OPIOID ANALGESIC, ANXIOLYTIC AND HYPNOTIC PRESCRIBING BY GENERAL PRACTITIONER REGISTRARS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Parker Magin
2014 Scott A, Brown A, Dunlop A, Gill T, Holland R, Fisk C, et al., 'QT PROLONGATION IN OPIOID SUBSTITUTION THERAPY: ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS 12-LEAD ELECTROCARDIOGRAM RECORDINGS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors Geoffrey Isbister, A Dunlop, Leonie Calver
2014 Montebello M, Allsop D, Copeland J, Lintzeris N, Dunlop A, Sadler C, et al., 'CANNABINOID REPLACEMENT THERAPY FOR MANAGEMENT OF CANNABIS WITHDRAWAL: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF NABIXIMOLS (SATIVEX (R))', AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Nielsen S, Larance B, Lintzeris N, Holliday S, Vanderhaven M, Hordern A, et al., 'SEEKING TREATMENT FOR PHARMACEUTICAL OPIOID DEPENDENCE: BASELINE CHARACTERISTICS FROM AN IN-TREATMENT COHORT', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Ezard N, Dunlop A, Lintzeris N, Carr A, Bruno R, 'LISDEXAMFETAMINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF METHAMPHETAMINE DEPENDENCE, A DOSE-ESCALATION STUDY PROTOCOL', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Leung S, Rivas G, Monds L, Holland R, Brown A, Deacon R, et al., 'SUBOXONE FILM ORAL REMOVAL STUDY - COMPARING "STACKING" VERSUS "SPACING" PHENOMENAE AND THE EFFECT OF SUPERVISION TIME ON MEDICATION DIVERSION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Nielsen S, Bruno R, Murnion B, Dunlop A, Degenhardt L, Demirkol A, et al., 'TREATING CODEINE DEPENDENCE WITH BUPRENORPHINE: HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH?', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2014) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Alavi M, Micallef M, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, Day CA, Treloar C, et al., 'Impact of treatment willingness on specialist assessment and treatment for hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in the opioid substitution setting: The ETHOS Study', Suchtmedizin in Forschung und Praxis (2013)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Alavi M, Grebely J, Micallef M, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, Day CA, Treloar C, 'Assessment and treatment of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in the opioid substitution setting: The ETHOS study', Suchtmedizin in Forschung und Praxis (2013)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Bamvita J, Grebely J, Alavi M, Micallef M, Dunlop AJ, Balcomb AC, et al., 'Typology of people who inject drugs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection: A novel method to uncover factors important in understanding HCV treatment uptake', Suchtmedizin in Forschung und Praxis (2013)
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Holmes J, Lintzeris N, Dunlop AJ, Childs S, Merinda T, Hamilton M, 'DEVELOPING AN OUTCOME FRAMEWORK FOR DRUG AND ALCOHOL SERVICES IN NSW', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Newman L, Perry N, Dunlop AJ, 'THE IMPACT OF PARENTAL SUBSTANCE USE ON CHILDREN. A DISCUSSION ABOUT CHILD PROTECTION AND TARGETED INTERVENTION', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Allsop DJ, Copeland J, Lintzeris N, Dunlop AJ, Montebello M, Sadler C, et al., 'A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF SATIVEX (R) AS AN AGONIST REPLACEMENT THERAPY DURING CANNABIS WITHDRAWAL', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Holland RM, Brown A, Fisk C, Robertson B, Dunlop AJ, 'KRONIC IN THE CLINIC: A NEWCASTLE PERSPECTIVE', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Bruno R, Allsop DJ, Copeland J, McGregor L, Norberg MM, Dunlop AJ, et al., 'THE IMPACT OF SATIVEX (R) ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION DURING TREATMENT FOR CANNABIS WITHDRAWAL', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Brown A, Perry N, Dunlop AJ, Newman L, 'USE OF BIRD'S NEST DRAWING IN ASSESSING ATTACHMENT IN FAMILIES WITH SUBSTANCE USE PROBLEMS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Ezard N, Barry J, Dunlop AJ, Francis B, Crosby B, Lintzeris N, 'ADDRESSING PSYCHOSTIMULANT USE PROBLEMS IN NSW, AUSTRALIA: ALCOHOL AND DRUG SERVICE TRAINING NEEDS', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2013 Nielsen S, Muhleisen P, Murnion B, Sadler C, Ling S, Smith C, et al., 'PHARMACEUTICAL OPIOID TREATMENT PRESENTATIONS PRESCRIBED METHADONE OR BUPRENORPHINE IN THREE NEW SOUTH WALES LOCAL HEALTH DISTRICT DRUG TREATMENT SERVICES', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2013) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Holliday S, Magin PJ, Dunbabin JS, Oldmeadow CJ, Henry J-M, Lintzeris N, et al., 'Motivating factors amongst NSW general practitioners regarding the prescription of opioid substitution therapy', Drug and Alcohol Review (2012) [E3]
Citations Web of Science - 1
Co-authors Parker Magin, Christopher Oldmeadow, A Dunlop, John Attia
2012 Breen C, Burns L, Conroy E, Powers J, Loxton DJ, Hutchinson D, et al., 'Caring for individuals affected by foetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Positives, challenges and suggestions for improvement', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors Deborah Loxton, Jenny Powers, A Dunlop
2012 Nielsen S, Larance B, Black E, Lintzeris N, Degenhardt L, Ali R, et al., 'Pain prevalence, severity and interference in an Australian opioid agonist treatment sample', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Perry N, Dunlop AJ, Brown A, Newman L, 'An attachment-based group parenting intervention for substance dependent mothers and infants', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Perry N, Parkes A, Tsantefski M, Brown A, Dunlop AJ, Newman L, 'Assessment of parenting capacity by alcohol and other drug workers: What to do and how to do it', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Puxty S, Dunlop AJ, 'Managing medico-legal risk in drug and alcohol treatment', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Ryan A, Dunlop AJ, Holmes J, Hunt V, Lintzeris N, Mammen K, 'The Australian Treatment Outcomes Profile Phase II: Clinical outcome monitoring for the drug and alcohol sector', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2012 Muhleisen P, Dunlop AJ, Brown A, Gardner L, Cochrane C, Carnell J, 'The film was not a drama', Drug and Alcohol Review: Abstracts of the Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs Conference 2012 (2012) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Holliday S, Magin PJ, Dunlop AJ, Dunbabin JS, Henry J, Goode SM, et al., 'Opioid analgesics in chronic non-cancer pain: A quality use of medicines study', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, John Attia, Parker Magin
2011 Dunbabin JS, Holliday SM, Magin PJ, Dunlop AJ, Ewald BD, Goode SM, Henry J, 'Discomfort with mental illness in general practice waiting rooms: A cross-sectional study', 2011 PHC Research Conference Abstracts (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Parker Magin, A Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2011 Lintzeris N, Ali R, Dunlop AJ, Leung S, Muhleisen P, 'Harms: How much, how many, how often?', Drug & Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Newman L, Perry N, Dunlop AJ, 'Improving parenting risk assessment in a 'high-risk' drug abusing antenatal population', Drug & Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Lintzeris N, Ali R, Dunlop AJ, Leung S, Muhleisen P, 'Symposium - Making a switch to suboxone sublingual film: The evidence and practical implications', Drug & Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Ryan A, Demirkol A, Dunlop AJ, Hermosilla R, Holmes J, Hunt V, et al., 'Workshop - The Australian Treatment Outcome Profile (ATOP): Clinical outcome monitoring for the drug and alcohol sector', Drug & Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Thompson T, Dunlop AJ, Madden A, Lintzeris N, Hinton T, Burrows N, 'Symposium - Consumer participation and representation in drug and alcohol services: What are we doing and are we getting it right?', Drug & Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Black E, Larance B, Mattick R, Lintzeris N, Degenhardt L, Bruno R, et al., 'Minimising the unintended consequences of opioid treatment: Development of a drug behaviour scale for use in Australia', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Holland R, Dunlop AJ, Hinman J, Ribbons K, Sadler CW, Gill AJ, et al., 'Buprenorphine-naloxone vs wait list control RCT: Health service utilisation and health economic outcomes', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors Patrick Mcelduff, A Dunlop, John Attia
2011 Jones H, Burns L, Gordon A, Kaltenbach K, Dunlop AJ, Conroy E, et al., 'Symposium - Emerging clinical issues in the treatment of women with substance use disorders: from pregnancy to parenting', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 Newman L, Perry N, Dunlop AJ, 'Presenter 4: Improving parenting risk assessment in a 'high-risk' drug abusing antenatal population', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 McKetin R, Dunlop AJ, Holland R, Sutherland R, Baker AL, Hudson S, 'The NSW health stimulant treatment program evaluation', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
2011 Puxty S, Dunlop AJ, 'The legal minefield of patient relationships in drug and alcohol treatment', Drug and Alcohol Review (2011) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2010 Holliday SM, Dunlop AJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Henry J, Dunbabin JS, Ewald BD, 'Does GP care of drug & alcohol patients cause distress to other patients? A cross-sectional waiting room study', 2010 Primary Health Care Research Conference: Program & Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Parker Magin, Ben Ewald, A Dunlop
2010 Holliday SM, Dunlop AJ, Magin PJ, Goode SM, Henry J, Dunbabin JS, Ewald BD, 'Patient experiences of GP waiting rooms: A cross-sectional study', GP10. Abstracts (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Parker Magin, A Dunlop, Ben Ewald
2010 Dunlop A, Lintzeris N, Gill T, Sadler C, Ribbons K, Attia J, et al., 'EFFECTIVENESS AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF UNSUPERVISED BUPRENORPHINE-NALOXONE VERSUS WAIT LIST CONTROL RCT', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Patrick Mcelduff, John Attia
2010 Hill KN, Aldrich R, Duggan A, Dunlop AJ, 'ENHANCING CLINICAL COMMUNICATION: A MODEL FOR DRUG AND ALCOHOL LEADERSHIP', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2010 Holliday S, Magin P, Dunlop A, Ewald B, Henry J, Goode S, Dunbabin J, 'DOES PRESCRIBING OPIATE SUBSTITUTION THERAPY DISTRESS A GENERAL PRACTITIONER'S OTHER PATIENTS? A CROSS-SECTIONAL WAITING ROOM STUDY', DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW (2010) [E3]
Co-authors Ben Ewald, A Dunlop, Parker Magin
2009 Dunlop AJ, McKetin R, Salmon A, Holland R, Baker AL, 'The stimulant treatment program evaluation: Client characteristics and preliminary outcomes', Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs Conference 2009 APSAD 2009 Conference (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00130.x
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
2009 Dodds LH, Soh T, Dunlop AJ, 'The Australasian Chapter of Addiction Medicine Trainees Symposium', Drug and Alcohol Review (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00130.x
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Holliday SM, Dunlop AJ, Magin PJ, Ewald BD, Henry J, Goode SM, Dunbabin JS, 'The waiting room ambience in general practice (WRAP) study: Patients attitudes to aspects of their experience in GPs' waiting rooms', Drug and Alcohol Review (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00123.x
Co-authors Ben Ewald, A Dunlop, Parker Magin
2009 Ling S, Dunlop AJ, Curtis J, 'Barriers to nurse practitioner authorisation in senior rural drug and alcohol nurses in New South Wales', Drug and Alcohol Review (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00123.x
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Lintzeris N, Ali R, Dunlop AJ, Haber P, Wodak A, 'Prescription opioid policy: What is working/not working, and what can we do better', Drug and Alcohol Review (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00130.x
Co-authors A Dunlop
2009 Dunlop AJ, Bell J, Gill AJ, Sadler CW, Ribbons K, Holland R, et al., 'Buprenorphine-naloxone waiting list randomised controlled trial: Preliminary results', Drug and Alcohol Review (2009) [E3]
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2009.00123.x
Co-authors A Dunlop
2008 Knock EJ, Cleworth S, Davies R, Hudson S, Robertson B, Salmon A, et al., 'Management of low level psychotic disorders in stimulant users participating in ambulatory treatment', Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2008) [E3]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
Show 67 more conferences

Report (5 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Gowing L, Ali R, Dunlop A, Farrell M, Lintzeris N, 'National Guidelines for Medication-Assisted Treatment of Opioid Dependence', Department of Health, Commonwealth of Australia (2014) [R1]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2014 Dunlop AJ, 'Clinical Guidelines For The Management of Substance Use During Pregnancy, Birth and The Postnatal Period', NSW Ministry of Health (2014) [R1]
Co-authors A Dunlop
2011 McKetin R, Dunlop A, Holland R, Sutherland R, Baker AL, Salmon A, Hudson S, 'Stimulant Treatment Program Evaluation Report 2011', NSW Health (2011)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
2008 Dunlop AJ, Tulloch B, McKetin R, Adam T, Baker AL, Wodak A, 'Preliminary evaluation of the NSW stimulant program', Mental Health Drug and Alcohol Office, NSW Department of Health, 28 (2008) [R1]
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
2008 Dunlop A, Tulloch B, McKetin R, Adam T, Baker AL, Wodak A, 'Preliminary Evaluation of the NSW Stimulant Treatment Program', NSW Health. (2008)
Co-authors A Dunlop, Amanda Baker
Show 2 more reports
Edit

Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 30
Total funding $10,931,679

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20164 grants / $5,513,708

Novel interventions to address methamphetamines in Aboriginal communities, including a randomised trial of a web based therapeutic tool used to treat dependence in clinical settings$2,177,908

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study of lisdexamfetamine for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence$1,303,735

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme Discovery project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Enhancing treatment of Hepatitis C in opioid substitution setting II (ETHOS II): a partnership project to enhance Hepatitis C care in drug and alcohol clinics$1,265,716

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

A practice change intervention to increase the provision of antenatal care addressing maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy: a stepped-wedge trial$766,349

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2016
Funding Finish 2016
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20152 grants / $777,111

An RCT of cannabinoid replacement therapy (Sativex®) for the management of treatment-resistant cannabis dependent patients$762,711

Funding body: NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)

Funding body NHMRC (National Health & Medical Research Council)
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Addiction Imaging$14,400

Funding body: Hunter Medical Research Institute

Funding body Hunter Medical Research Institute
Project Team Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Doctor Amanda Brown, Associate Professor Chris Dayas, Associate Professor Peter Stanwell, Associate Professor Nicholas Lintzeris, Professor Iain McGregor, Dr David Allsop, Dr Nghi Phung
Scheme Research Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2016
GNo G1500923
Type Of Funding Grant - Aust Non Government
Category 3AFG
UON Y

20141 grants / $454,545

NSW Drug & Alchohol Service Clinical Outcome and Quality Indicator (COQI) Framework$454,545

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo
Type Of Funding Not Known
Category UNKN
UON N

20132 grants / $573,930

Experiences of addiction, treatment and recovery: an online resource for members of the public, health professionals and policy makers$499,000

Funding body: ARC (Australian Research Council)

Funding body ARC (Australian Research Council)
Scheme Discovery Project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Kronic in the cannabis clinic: impact of synthetic cannabinoids on treatment seekers and health services$74,930

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20121 grants / $354,054

Double blind randomised controlled trial of electronic alcohol screening and brief intervention (s-SBI) for hospital outpatients$354,054

Funding body: Australian National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body Australian National Health and Medical Research Council
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20112 grants / $641,283

Activate - a collaborative trial in injectors of individualized treatment for genotype 2/3$400,000

Funding body: Kirby Institute

Funding body Kirby Institute
Scheme Discovery project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Sativex in the management of cannabis withdrawal$241,283

Funding body: National Health & Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health & Medical Research Council
Scheme Discovery project
Role Lead
Funding Start 2011
Funding Finish 2011
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20103 grants / $180,000

Aberrant drug behaviours$90,000

Funding body: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre

Funding body National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre
Scheme Discovery project
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Pharmacotherapies: pain and addictions; GPs and pharmacists$45,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Validating of treatment outcome profile instrument under Australian conditions$45,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2010
Funding Finish 2010
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20091 grants / $15,000

Prescribed and Illicit opiates in society survey$15,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2009
Funding Finish 2009
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20088 grants / $2,107,248

Enhanced treatment for Hepatitis C in opoid substitution settings$1,495,188

Funding body: National Health and Medical Research Council

Funding body National Health and Medical Research Council
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

Two year evaluation of stimulant treatment clinics$283,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

A randomized controlled trial of unsupervised buprenorphine-naloxone versus wait list control$121,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Preliminary evaluation of stimulant treatment clinics$80,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

An attachment-based group parenting intervention for substance dependent mothers and infants$54,000

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Conjoint Professor Louise Newman, Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Mr Peter Walsh
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189627
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

Modification and validation of treatment outcom profile instrument under Australian conditions and evaluate implementation of outcome measurement in three opioid pharmacotherapy treatment services$50,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Addiction pharmacotherapy in private rural general practice$15,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

Improving parenting risk assessment in a 'high risk' drug and alcohol abusing antenatal population$9,060

Funding body: NSW Ministry of Health

Funding body NSW Ministry of Health
Project Team Doctor Kumudu Rathnayaka, Conjoint Professor Louise Newman, Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop, Professor Ian Symonds, Mr Peter Walsh
Scheme Drug and Alcohol Grants Program
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2008
Funding Finish 2008
GNo G0189628
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - State
Category 2OPS
UON Y

20071 grants / $15,000

Barriers to senior alcohol and drug nurses seeking nurse practioner status$15,000

Funding body: Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)

Funding body Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (MHDAO)
Scheme Project grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2007
Funding Finish 2007
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

20051 grants / $50,000

Modafinil RCT for amphetamine withdrawal$50,000

Funding body: Department of Health

Funding body Department of Health
Scheme Project Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2005
Funding Finish 2015
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Commonwealth
Category 1CS
UON N

20042 grants / $49,800

Shared care alcohol project$24,900

Funding body: Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation

Funding body Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

Shared care alcohol project$24,900

Funding body: Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation

Funding body Alcohol Education & Rehabilitation Foundation
Scheme Research Grant
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2004
Funding Finish 2004
GNo
Type Of Funding Other Public Sector - Commonwealth
Category 2OPC
UON N

20031 grants / $100,000

Buprenorphine-naloxone RCT$100,000

Funding body: Victorian Department of Human Services (DHSV)

Funding body Victorian Department of Human Services (DHSV)
Scheme Research contract
Role Lead
Funding Start 2003
Funding Finish 2003
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N

19991 grants / $100,000

Treating ethnic Vietnamese heroin users with new opioid pharmacotherapies$100,000

Funding body: Victorian Department of Human Services (DHSV)

Funding body Victorian Department of Human Services (DHSV)
Scheme Research contract
Role Lead
Funding Start 1999
Funding Finish 1999
GNo
Type Of Funding Aust Competitive - Non Commonwealth
Category 1NS
UON N
Edit

Research Supervision

Number of supervisions

Completed5
Current4

Total current UON EFTSL

PhD0.5

Current Supervision

Commenced Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2017 PhD Targeted Antenatal Smoking Cessation Intervention in High-Risk Substance Dependent Pregnancy PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2013 PhD Increasing the Provision of Preventive Care Delivered by Community Health Drug and Alcohol Clinicians PhD (Behavioural Science), Faculty of Health and Medicine, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 Masters The feasibility of an internet based tobacco treatment in a NSW Health cannabis clinic Psychology, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2013 Masters The feasibility of an internet based tobacco treatment in a NSW Health cannabis clinic Psychology, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor

Past Supervision

Year Level of Study Research Title Program Supervisor Type
2015 Honours Synthetic cannabinoids: Patterns of use, motives, effects and harms in treatment-seeking cannabis users Psychology, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2014 Honours QT prolongation and methadone & buprenorphine Medical Science, The University of Newcastle Principal Supervisor
2014 Masters Day Care Programs for Patients on OTP Psychology, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2012 PhD Improving antenatal risk assessment in a high-risk substance using antenatal population Psychology, The University of Newcastle Co-Supervisor
2009 PhD Buprenorphine and benzodiazepines: interactions in human and animal models Pharmacology, Monash University Co-Supervisor
Edit

Research Collaborations

The map is a representation of a researchers co-authorship with collaborators across the globe. The map displays the number of publications against a country, where there is at least one co-author based in that country. Data is sourced from the University of Newcastle research publication management system (NURO) and may not fully represent the authors complete body of work.

Country Count of Publications
Australia 134
United Kingdom 15
United States 12
Canada 6
Belgium 1
More...
Edit

Conjoint Associate Professor Adrian Dunlop

Position

Conjoint Professor
School of Medicine and Public Health
Faculty of Health and Medicine

Focus area

Medicine

Contact Details

Email adrian.dunlop@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4016 4664
Mobile 0423568178
Fax (02) 4016 4661

Office

Room Newcastle Community Health Centre, Level 3, 670 Hunter St
Edit