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Dr Aashild Naess

Senior Lecturer

School of Humanities and Social Science (Linguistics)

A way with words

A love of language has taken Åshild Næss to unexpected places.

a way with words

Linguist Dr Åshild Næss is an unlikely person to have gravitated to field research. The researcher with the Faculty of Education and Arts' Endangered Languages Documentation, Theory and Application Group admits to liking her creature comforts and claims to not have an adventurous bone in her body.

Her first field trip, as a 23-year-old Norwegian Masters student, involved a treacherous boat trip to one of the tiniest, most remote islands in the Pacific, where food and water were scarce, power supply non-existent and her sleeping quarters frequently invaded by spiders the size of small dinner plates.

"I swore then that I would never do field work again," recalls Næss, who promptly moved to the Netherlands after that experience to pursue a theoretical PhD on verb transitivity, which she researched within the safe, comfortable confines of the University of Nijmegen library.

However, when her former Masters supervisor Even Hovdhaugen offered her a postdoctoral research opportunity back in the Solomon Islands, where she had made her first field trip, Næss once again packed her bags and insect repellent.

Næss has since forged a niche specialising in the description and documentation of two languages - Äiwoo and Vaekau-Taumako - spoken in the isolated Reef Islands area of the Solomons. Äiwoo has about 7000 speakers, sprinkled across a number of islands, and Vaekau-Taumako about 1500.

The two languages have existed in close proximity for an estimated 1000 years, yet are quite different, something that has long intrigued researchers across a range of disciplines. Næss' work on Äiwoo led to a breakthrough finding on the origin of the language that settled a decades-old debate between linguists and provided researchers in other fields with new insight into the migratory pattern of the region's settlers.

It had been theorised that Äiwoo had a Papuan language foundation, because of its apparent difference to the Austronesian group of languages common to the area. However, by analysing the language in collaboration with an historical linguist, Næss proved that the Papuan hypothesis was incorrect and Äiwoo was an Austronesian language.

"Archaeologists had been struggling for years with the idea that there were Papuan languages in this area because they had never found any evidence that the Papuan migration had advanced that far," Næss says.

"So our result, while unexpected among linguists, verified what archaeologists had found, which was an important outcome because this is a key area for understanding the settlement of the Pacific."

In 2011, Naæs published a reference grammar of Vaekau-Taumako, co-authored by Hovdhaugen, and hopes her appointment this year to the University of Newcastle will provide her with the opportunity to further her work in the description and documentation of Äiwoo. She is also keen to expand her research into the effects of contact between the 13 languages spoken in Temotu Province, the easternmost province of the Solomons, analysing the lexical and structural borrowing that has taken place.

While still a reluctant field worker, Næss says her love of language ultimately outweighs any trepidation about spartan living conditions and oversized arachnids.

"I find it incredibly stimulating and challenging," she says. "It is a bit like doing a really big and complicated crossword puzzle. You figure out one bit, then another bit changes completely as a result of that, then you have to go back and revise everything."

a way with words

A way with words

A love of language has taken Åshild Næss to unexpected places.

Read more

Career Summary

Biography

I completed an MA in linguistics at the University of Oslo in 1998; my MA thesis was a sketch grammar of a previously undescribed Polynesian language of the Solomon Islands. I then went on to do a PhD in linguistics at the University of Nijmegen, completed 2004; a revised version of my dissertation was published under the title "Prototypical Transitivity" by John Benjamins in 2007. I have since held postdoctoral positions at the University of Oslo and the University of Nijmegen, and a Visiting Professorship at the University of Zürich. I have been employed as Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Newcastle since January 2012.

Research Expertise
I specialise in linguistic typology and language documentation/description. In typology, my main research interest have so far been in the notion of transitivity as a crosslinguistic category, and in the crosslinguistic properties of case marking; most recently on how case-marking is linked to the marking of pragmatic properties in language. I have also published research on verb serialisation and complex verb forms, and on how these are linked to the conceptualisation of complex events. I have done linguistic fieldwork on two languages spoken in the eastern Solomon Islands, Vaeakau-Taumako (Pileni) and Äiwoo. In 2011 I published a reference grammar of Vaeakau-Taumako, co-authored with Even Hovdhaugen. My work on Äiwoo was instrumental in resolving a decades-long debate about the origin of the so-called Reefs-Santa Cruz languages; they are now generally accepted to belong to the Oceanic subgroup of the Austronesian language family. I have also studied the language-contact situation between Äiwoo and Vaeakau-Taumako, and the mechanisms through which lexical and structural borrowing has taken place between these languages. 

Collaborations
I am an affiliated partner with the research project "“Evolution of Semantic Systems” at the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen. I maintain informal collaborative links with a number of colleagues at various institutions, including the Australian National University, the University of Oslo, the University of Zürich, and the LACITO research centre in Paris.

Qualifications

  • PhD (Linguistics), University of Nijmegan - The Netherlands
  • Cand Magisterii (Equiv Bachelor Deg), University of Oslo - Norway
  • Cand Philol (Equiv MRes), University of Oslo - Norway

Keywords

  • Introduction to Linguistics
  • Language contact
  • Language documentation and description
  • Linguistic typology
  • Oceanic languages
  • Typology

Languages

  • Dutch (Fluent)
  • Danish (Fluent)
  • Norwegian (Fluent)
  • French (Fluent)
  • Solomon Islands Pijin (Fluent)

Professional Experience

UON Appointment

Title Organisation / Department
Senior Lecturer University of Newcastle
School of Humanities and Social Science
Australia

Academic appointment

Dates Title Organisation / Department
1/01/2012 -  Membership - Linguistics Linguistics
Australia
1/01/2010 -  Membership - Medicinal Chemistry Medicinal Chemistry
Australia
1/01/2008 -  Membership - Linguistic Society of America Linguistic Society of America
United States
1/01/2002 -  Membership - Association for Linguistic Typology Association for Linguistic Typology
United States
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Publications

For publications that are currently unpublished or in-press, details are shown in italics.


Book (4 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Naess A, Hovdhaugen E, A Grammar of Vaeakau-Taumako, de Gruyter Mouton, Berlin, Germany, 519 (2011) [A1]
2011 Naess A, Global grammatikk: Språktypologi for språklærere, Gyldendal Akademisk, Oslo, Norway, 274 (2011) [A2]
2007 Naess A, Prototypical transitivity, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 240 (2007) [A1]
2000 Naess A, Pileni, Lincom Europa, Munich, Germany, 88 (2000) [A1]
Show 1 more book

Chapter (10 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2011 Naess A, 'Reefs-Santa Cruz: Reclassifying a language group.', Identity Matters: Movement and Place, The Kon-Tiki Museum, Oslo 63-77 (2011)
2011 Hovdhaugen E, Naess A, 'Language is power: the impact of fieldwork on community politics', Documenting endangered languages: Achievements and perspectives, de Gruyter Mouton, Berlin, Germany 291-304 (2011) [B1]
DOI 10.1515/9783110260021.291
2011 Naess A, 'Case on the margins: pragmatics and argument marking in Vaeakau-Taumako and beyond', Case, animacy and semantic roles, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 305-328 (2011) [B1]
DOI 10.1075/tsl.99.11nae
2009 Naess A, 'How transitive are EAT and DRINK verbs?', The linguistics of eating and drinking, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 27-43 (2009) [B1]
2009 Naess A, 'Varieties of dative', The Oxford Handbook of Case, Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom 572-580 (2009) [B1]
2007 Naess A, 'Defining transitivity: markedness vs prototypicality', New trends in typology: Young typologists¿ contributions to linguistic theory, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, Germany 179-198 (2007) [B1]
2006 Naess A, 'Case semantics and the agent-patient opposition', Case, valency and transitivity, John Benjamins, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 309-327 (2006) [B1]
2006 Naess A, 'Past, present and future in Reefs-Santa Cruz research', Sustainable data from digital fieldwork: from creation to archive and back., Sydney University Press, Sydney, Australia 157-162 (2006) [B1]
2004 Naess A, 'Spatial deixis in Pileni', Deixis and demonstratives in Oceanic languages, Pacific Linguistics, Canberra, Australia 81-97 (2004) [B1]
2004 Naess A, 'Serial verbs and complex constructions in Pileni', Complex predicates in Oceanic languages: studies in the dynamics of binding and boundness, Mouton de Gruyter, Berlin, Germany 225-249 (2004) [B1]
Show 7 more chapters

Journal article (22 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2015 Næss Å, 'The Äiwoo verb phrase: Syntactic ergativity without pivots', Journal of Linguistics, 51 75-106 (2015)

Formal models of syntax typically accord the structural position external to the verb's domain a privileged status in the overall syntactic makeup of a language, either by assumin... [more]

Formal models of syntax typically accord the structural position external to the verb's domain a privileged status in the overall syntactic makeup of a language, either by assuming that external arguments are always S or A, or by linking external argument position to syntactic pivothood. This paper demonstrates that the Oceanic language Äiwoo has an ergative verb phrase - i.e. A as the VP-internal argument and S/O as external arguments - but no corresponding S/O pivot. That is, the ergative structure of the verb phrase in Äiwoo does not entail any syntactically privileged status of the VP-external arguments; rather, it is simply a by-product of various diachronic developments. This situation shows that what has traditionally been perceived as fundamental differences in grammatical organisation - the difference between an accusative and an ergative pattern of VP structure - need not in fact be associated with any broader differences in syntactic or pragmatic structure. More importantly, it goes against the assumption that it is possible to assign universal functions to syntactic configurations. Instead, it can be seen as providing support for the view argued for by Evans & Levinson (2009: 444) that 'most linguistic diversity is the product of historical cultural evolution operating on relatively independent traits'.

DOI 10.1017/S0022226714000048
2015 Næss Å, 'The Äiwoo verb phrase: Syntactic ergativity without pivots', Journal of Linguistics, 51 75-106 (2015)
DOI 10.1017/S0022226714000048
2014 Berthele R, Whelpton M, Næss A, Duijff P, 'Static spatial descriptions in five Germanic languages', Language Sciences, (2014)

The paper presents qualitative and quantitative analyses of expressions describing static topological relations in Frisian, Icelandic, and Norwegian (Bokmål), Swiss German, and S... [more]

The paper presents qualitative and quantitative analyses of expressions describing static topological relations in Frisian, Icelandic, and Norwegian (Bokmål), Swiss German, and Standard German. According to the literature, speakers of Germanic languages typically express more than just the bare minimum of spatial relational information when describing spatial scenes. As an example, they can add postural or other manner information as an unmarked choice in their spatial descriptions (the cup stands on the table vs. the cup is on the table). The main focus lies on a detailed description of the modalities and proportions of this additional expression of information on the spatial scene in the five languages. Distributed expression of spatial relational semantics, posture verb usage and resultative constructions are analyzed. Descriptive and inferential methods are used to show the similarities and differences across the five languages, on the level of group tendencies (means), of individual speakers, and of individual stimulus items. The analyses show considerable differences across the languages. Speakers of Standard German and Frisian are most prone to integrate additional manner information into the descriptions, whereas speakers of Icelandic, Norwegian or Swiss German only rarely integrate this kind of information into their spatial descriptions. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.langsci.2014.07.006
Citations Web of Science - 1
2014 Vejdemo S, Levisen C, van Scherpenberg C, Gudmundsdóttir Beck T, Næss A, Zimmermann M, et al., 'Two kinds of pink: development and difference in Germanic colour semantics', Language Sciences, (2014)

This article traces the birth of two different pink categories in western Europe and the lexicalization strategies used for these categories in English, German, Bernese, Danish, S... [more]

This article traces the birth of two different pink categories in western Europe and the lexicalization strategies used for these categories in English, German, Bernese, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Icelandic with the cognate sets pink, rosa, bleikur, lyserød, ceris. In the 18th century, a particular shade of light red established itself in the cultural life of people in Western Europe, earning its own independent colour term. In the middle of the 20th century, a second pink category began to spread in a subset of the languages. Contemporary experimental data from the Evolution of Semantic Systems colour project (Majid et¿al., 2011) is analysed in light of the extant historical data on the development of these colour terms. We find that the current pink situation arose through contact-induced lexical and conceptual change. Despite the different lexicalization strategies, the terms' denotation is remarkably similar for the oldest pink category and we investigate the impact of the advent of the younger and more restricted secondary pink category on the colour categorization and colour denotations of the languages. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI 10.1016/j.langsci.2014.07.007
Citations Scopus - 1Web of Science - 2
2013 Næss Å, 'From Austronesian Voice to Oceanic Transitivity: Äiwoo as the "Missing Link"', Oceanic Linguistics, 52 106-124 (2013) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/ol.2013.0005
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Boerger BH, Naess A, Vaa A, Emerine R, Hoover A, 'Sociological factors in Reefs-Santa Cruz language vitality: a 40 year retrospective', International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 214 111-152 (2012) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 1
2012 Naess A, 'Cutting and breaking in Aiwoo: Event integration and the complexity of lexical expressions', Cognitive Linguistics, 23 395-420 (2012) [C1]
DOI 10.1515/cog-2012-0012
Citations Scopus - 3Web of Science - 2
2012 Naess A, 'Structural parallels between Vaeakau-Taumako and the Vanuatu outliers: Capell revisited', Oceanic Linguistics, 51 567-588 (2012) [C1]
2011 Naess A, 'The grammar of eating and drinking verbs', Language and Linguistics Compass, 5/6 413-423 (2011) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 2
2011 Naess A, Jenny M, 'Who changes language? Bilingualism and structural change in Burma and the Reef Islands', Journal of Language Contact: evolution of languages contact and discourse, IV 217-249 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1163/187740911X589253
2011 Naess A, 'Directional verbs in Vaeakau-Taumako', Oceanic Linguistics, 50 120-139 (2011) [C1]
DOI 10.1353/ol.2011.0007
2011 Naess A, ''Natur i Norge er det litt forskjellig': Det-setninger som topikaliseringsstrategi i tekster skrevet av vietnamesiske innlærere. ['Natur i Norge er det litt forskjellig': Sentences with expletive subjects as a topicalisation strategy in texts written by Vietnamese learners or Norwegian]', NOA Norsk som andrespråk, 27 5-23 (2011) [C1]
2010 Naess A, 'Deconstructing Constructions', STUDIES IN LANGUAGE, 34 934-942 (2010) [C3]
DOI 10.1075/sl.34.4.08nae
2009 Naess A, 'The typology of semantic alignment', LANGUAGE, 85 713-716 (2009) [C3]
2008 Naess A, 'Language description, history and development; Linguistic indulgence in memory of Terry Crowley', BIJDRAGEN TOT DE TAAL- LAND- EN VOLKENKUNDE, 164 552-553 (2008) [C3]
2008 Naess A, Boerger BH, 'Reefs-Santa Cruz as Oceanic: Evidence from the verb complex', Oceanic Linguistics, 47 185-212 (2008) [C1]
Citations Scopus - 10
2007 Ross M, Næss Å, 'An oceanic origin for Äiwoo, the language of the Reef Islands?', Oceanic Linguistics, 46 456-498 (2007) [C1]

Whether the languages of the Reefs-Santa Cruz (RSC) group have a Papuan or an Austronesian origin has long been in dispute. Various background issues are treated in the introducto... [more]

Whether the languages of the Reefs-Santa Cruz (RSC) group have a Papuan or an Austronesian origin has long been in dispute. Various background issues are treated in the introductory section. In section 2 we examine the lexicon of the RSC and Utupua-Vanikoro languages and show that there are regular sound correspondences among these languages, and that RSC languages display regular reflexes of Proto-Oceanic etyma and are therefore Austronesian. We also show that together the RSC and Utupua-Vanikoro, languages form an Oceanic subgroup, which we label "Temotu," and that the Temotu group is probably a first-order subgroup within the Oceanic family. In section 3, we examine a variety of constructions and morphemes in Äiwoo, the language of the Reef Islands, to see whether they have plausible Oceanic sources. The answer in most cases is that they do. This is important, as several of these constructions have in the past been given as evidence that the RSC languages have a Papuan origin. We conclude that the RSC languages are Austronesian and that there is no need to posit a Papuan element to explain their origin. © by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 24
2007 Naess A, Hovdhaugen E, 'The history of Polynesian settlement in the Reef and Duff Islands: the linguistic evidence', Journal of the Polynesian Society, 116 433-449 (2007) [C1]
2006 Næss Å, 'Bound nominal elements in Äiwoo (Reefs): A reappraisal of the "multiple noun class systems"', Oceanic Linguistics, 45 269-296 (2006) [C1]

The little-described Reefs-Santa Cruz (RSC) languages are usually assumed to be of mixed Papuan-Austronesian origin, though attempts at linking them systematically either to known... [more]

The little-described Reefs-Santa Cruz (RSC) languages are usually assumed to be of mixed Papuan-Austronesian origin, though attempts at linking them systematically either to known Papuan or Austronesian languages have yielded meager results. One of the rinain arguments in the literature for the presence of "Papuan structures" in the RSC languages has been the claim that the languages have complex systems of noun classes, described in any detail only for the largest RSC language, Reefs or Äiwoo. This paper examines the claim that Äiwoo has one or more noun class systems, based on fieldwork material. It draws two main conclusions: First, the phenomena in question cannot be felicitously analyzed as noun classes in the usual sense of the term, and bear no obvious resemblance to the Papuan-style gender systems to which they have been compared. Rather, they are bound nominal elements of which some have a mainly nominalizing function, whereas others show characteristic properties of classifiers or class terms. Second, there is little or no evidence that the presence of these elements in the language indicates a non-Austronesian origin or influence. On the contrary, the classifier or class-term system, in fact, has obvious parallels in a number of Oceanic languages of Vanuatu. While this does not entail any conclusions about the genetic status of Äiwoo, or of RSC in general, it is clear that the so-called noun classes do not constitute evidence of a Papuan link. © by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.

Citations Scopus - 6
2004 Naess A, 'What markedness marks: the markedness problem with direct objects', Lingua, 114 1186-1212 (2004) [C1]
2002 Naess A, 'Transitivity and accusativity in Pileni', Rongorongo Studies, 12 66-76 (2002) [C2]
2000 Naess A, 'Possessive marking in Pileni', STUF: Sprachtypologie und Universalienforschung, 53 308-318 (2000) [C1]
Show 19 more journal articles

Conference (29 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2014 Naess A, 'Symmetrical voice in Äiwoo', Paper presented at the 7th conference on Austronesian and Papuan Languages and Linguistics, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK (2014)
2013 Naess A, Boerger BH, Vaa A, 'Generic agents in Reefs-Santa Cruz: Proto-Oceanic */ni- revisited', Paper presented at the 21st International Conference on Historical Linguistics, University of Oslo, Norway (2013) [E3]
2013 Naess A, 'From Austronesian voice to Oceanic transitivity: Äiwoo as the 'missing link'', Paper presented at the 9th Conference on Oceanic Linguistics, University of Newcastle (2013) [E2]
2013 Naess A, 'Split transitivity and the problem of grammatical relations', Paper presented at the Australian Linguistics Society Annual Conference, University of Melbourne (2013) [E3]
2012 Naess A, 'Clitics and the verb phrase in Aiwoo: Syntactic ergativity without pivots', 12th International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics, Bali (2012) [E3]
2011 Naess A, 'Case and pragmatic salience: What a language without case can tell us about pragmatic properties of case-marking systems', Paper presented at the 9th Biennial Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology, University of Hong Kong (2011) [E2]
2011 Naess A, Jenny M, 'Who changes language? Bilingualism and structural borrowing in Burma and the Reef Islands', Paper presented at the Conference on Rethinking Contact-Induced Change, Leiden University, the Netherlands (2011) [E2]
2010 Naess A, Hovdhaugen E, 'Language contact in the Reef Islands: keeping one's distance at close quarters', The Gotland Papers. Selected presentations from the VII International Conference on Easter Island and the Pacific: Migration, Identity, and Cultural Heritage., University of Gotland, Sweden (2010)
2010 Naess A, 'Transitivity and word classes in Äiwoo', Transalpine Typology Meeting, University of Pavia, Italy (2010) [E2]
2009 Naess A, 'The not-quite-case system of Vaeakau-Taumako', Paper presented at the SKY Conference on Case In and Across Languages, University of Helsinki, Finland (2009) [E2]
2007 Naess A, 'The structure of complex verbs in Äiwoo', Paper presented at the 3rd Conference on Austronesian Languages and Linguistics, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK (2007)
2007 Naess A, 'Defining transitivity: markedness vs prototypicality', Paper presented at the 7th Biennial Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology, Paris, France (2007)
2007 Ross M, Naess A, 'An Oceanic origin for Äiwoo, the language of the Reef Islands?', Paper presented at the 7th International Conference on Oceanic Linguistics, Université de la Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa, New Caledonia (2007)
2007 Naess A, 'Transitivity and word order in Äiwoo: an OVS language in the Solomon Islands', Paper presented at the 7th International Conference on Oceanic Linguistics, Université de la Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa, New Caledonia (2007)
2007 Naess A, 'Prototypical ditransitivity', Paper presented at the Conference on Ditransitive Constructions, Max Planck Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany (2007)
2006 Naess A, 'Bound nominal elements in Äiwoo: recategorising the 'noun classes'', Paper presented at the 2nd Conference on Austronesian Languages and Linguistics, Oxford, UK (2006)
2006 Naess A, 'Verb structure in Äiwoo: 'exotic' data and genetic classification', Paper presented at the Workshop om Mapping the Pacific: positions, representations and interpretations, University of Oslo, Norway (2006)
2006 Naess A, Hovdhaugen E, 'Äiwoo and Vaeakau-Taumako: contact and distance', Paper presented at the Workshop on Mapping the Pacific: positions, representations and interpretations, University of Oslo, Norway (2006)
2005 Naess A, 'Aspect, tense and mood in Äiwoo (Reefs-Santa Cruz, Solomon Islands)', Paper presented at the 1st Conference on Austronesian languages and Linguistics, St Catherine's College, Oxford, UK (2005)
2005 Naess A, 'The functions of case: unifying the discriminatory and indexing approaches', Paper presented at the 6th Biennial Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology, Padang, Indonesia (2005)
2004 Naess A, 'Determination and quantification in Pileni', Paper presented at the 6th International Conference on Oceanic Linguistics, University of the South Pacific, Port Vila, Vanuatu (2004)
2003 Naess A, 'Intransitive eating? The affected agent and its challenge to theories of transitivity', Paper presented at the 5th Biennial Meeting of the Association for Linguistic Typology, University of Cagliari, Italy (2003)
2003 Naess A, 'Eating and drinking in Ngiyambaa: the expression of universal semantic categories in apparently language-particular constructions', Paper presented at the Conference on Cross-Linguistic Data and Theories of Meaning, Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (2003)
2003 Naess A, 'Case semantics and the agent-patient opposition', Paper presented at the PIONIER Workshop on Case, Valency and Transitivity, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands (2003)
2002 Naess A, 'Eat, drink and be merry: the influence of affected-agent semantics on the interpretation of objectless clauses', Paper presented at Semantics in the Netherlands, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands (2002)
2002 Naess A, 'Transitive marking in Pileni', Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Oceanic Linguistics, Australian National University (2002)
2002 Naess A, 'What markedness marks: the markedness problem with direct objects', Paper presented at the PIONIER Workshop on Variation in Form vs Variation in Meaning, Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands (2002)
2001 Naess A, 'Serial verbs and shared-argument constructions in Pileni', Paper presented at the 3rd European Meeting on Oceanic Linguistics, LACITO-CNRS, Paris, France (2001)
1998 Naess A, 'Spatial deixis in Pileni', Paper presented at the 2nd European Meeting on Oceanic Linguistics, Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands (1998)
Show 26 more conferences

Thesis / Dissertation (2 outputs)

Year Citation Altmetrics Link
2004 Naess A, Transitivity: from semantics to structure, Radboud University Nijmegen (2004)
1998 Naess A, Pileni: A sketch of the grammar of a Polynesian Outlier language, University of Oslo (1998)
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Grants and Funding

Summary

Number of grants 7
Total funding $136,620

Click on a grant title below to expand the full details for that specific grant.


20151 grants / $18,379

Documenting Aiwoo$18,379

Funding body: The Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project

Funding body The Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project
Project Team Doctor Aashild Naess
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2015
Funding Finish 2015
GNo G1301371
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

20143 grants / $110,241

Endangered Languages Documentation, Theory and Application$90,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Bill Palmer, Doctor Mark Harvey, Doctor Aashild Naess, Doctor Catriona Malau
Scheme Research Programme 2014
Role Investigator
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400925
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

Documenting the Utupua languages$18,241

Funding body: The Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project

Funding body The Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project
Project Team Mr Aslak Vaag Olesen, Doctor Aashild Naess
Scheme Small Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1301372
Type Of Funding International - Competitive
Category 3IFA
UON Y

Austronesian and Papuan Languages and Linguistics, School of Oriental and African Studies, London, UK, 16-17 May 2014$2,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Aashild Naess
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2014
Funding Finish 2014
GNo G1400551
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20131 grants / $1,500

21st International Conference of Historical Linguistics, Oslo 4-9 August 2013$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Aashild Naess
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2013
Funding Finish 2013
GNo G1300772
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

20122 grants / $6,500

A linguistic Archive of Aiwoo$5,000

Funding body: University of Newcastle

Funding body University of Newcastle
Project Team Doctor Aashild Naess
Scheme New Staff Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200712
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y

12th International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, 2 - 6 July 2012$1,500

Funding body: University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts

Funding body University of Newcastle - Faculty of Education and Arts
Project Team Doctor Aashild Naess
Scheme Travel Grant
Role Lead
Funding Start 2012
Funding Finish 2012
GNo G1200580
Type Of Funding Internal
Category INTE
UON Y
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Research Supervision

Current Supervision

Commenced Research Title / Program / Supervisor Type
2014 Investigating Ergativity in Roviana
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2014 Documenting the Manihiki Language
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2014 Valence and Argument Structure in Nalogo
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Principal Supervisor
2014 Morphosyntactic Alignment in Mono-Alu (North West Solomonic)
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2012 The Effects of Teachers' Motivational Strategies on EFL Learner's Achievement
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2011 A Grammar of Nese
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2010 Documentation and Description of a Highly Endangered Northwest Solomonic Language
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
2010 Topics in a Grammar of Nehan
Linguistics, Faculty of Education and Arts
Co-Supervisor
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News

ELDP Grant success

UK grants to assist severely endangered languages

September 26, 2014

The University of Newcastle (UON) has been awarded three grants from the Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (ELDP), UK, to assist in the documentation of endangered Pacific languages.

Stephen Logan

Linguistics, Education and Sociology star in the QS World Rankings

March 18, 2014

If you want to be at the forefront of linguistics study and research in Australia, the University of Newcastle is the place to be.

Dr Aashild Naess

Position

Senior Lecturer
School of Humanities and Social Science
Faculty of Education and Arts

Focus area

Linguistics

Contact Details

Email aashild.naess@newcastle.edu.au
Phone (02) 4921 5890

Office

Room MC112
Building McMullin Building
Location Callaghan
University Drive
Callaghan, NSW 2308
Australia
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