The University of Newcastle’s Professor Julie Byles has been appointed as Global Innovation Chair in Responsive Transitions in Health and Ageing.

UON researcher a global leader in health and ageing

Tuesday, 9 May 2017


The University of Newcastle’s Professor Julie Byles has been appointed as Global Innovation Chair in Responsive Transitions in Health and Ageing.

Julie joins a list of outstanding Global Innovation Chairs at UON, part of a suite of initiatives aimed at enhancing our global research performance and reputation.

This is the first Global Innovation Chair from the Faculty of Health and Medicine at UON, and will play a significant role in developing and maintaining our leadership in this area, while driving evidence-based translational policy across the university and into the sector.

An internationally recognised gerontologist and epidemiologist, Julie’s work in healthcare evaluation and assessment of the determinants of healthy ageing has led to policy, processes and practices that improve the healthcare and life prospects of older people in Australia and around the world.

“We have to be global in our thinking about ageing,” Julie insists. “It’s a complex process that impacts everyone in every community around the world.”

With an ageing population, this position will lead in this critical area of health and medical research for the University and our community.

We all experience transitions in our lives, particularly as we age. But Julie says that we need to respond to these changes and not be overwhelmed by them. Julie has been working with the World Health Organization (WHO) on developing policy and planning for a healthy population where we support people to have their maximum abilities.

Julie is a founding investigator and a Director of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health (ALSWH) where she has led the development of a powerful evidence base for government on better health policies and practices.

A Fellow of the prestigious Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences and a Fellow, Past President (2011-2013) and Presidential Life Member of the Australian Association of Gerontology, Julie’s outstanding achievements have been recognised at the highest level.

We all experience transitions in our lives, particularly as we age but we need to respond to these changes and not be overwhelmed by them. Julie has been working with the World Health Organization (WHO) on developing policy and planning for a healthy population where we support people to have their maximum abilities.

A long-term collaborator, Julie has led research and policy collaborations with a range of international organisations and partners including the International Longevity Centre Global Alliance, and the International Association for Gerontology and Geriatrics.