Researchers from the University of Newcastle (UON) Podiatry Department are looking for volunteers to take part in a clinical trial.

Foot Pressure Study

Friday, 17 March 2017


Researchers from the University of Newcastle (UON) Podiatry Department are looking for volunteers to take part in a clinical trial to determine the relationship between ankle range of motion and pressures under the foot in people with diabetes.

Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter, Dr. Martin Spink and Ms Angela Searle are recruiting adults over 18 years of age with either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes to take part in the trial.

To obtain more information regarding this study or enquire about your eligibility contact PhD Candidate Ms Angela Searle at angela.searle@uon.edu.au or (02) 4348 4996.

More Information

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, affecting over 8% of the global population and is associated with a life-time risk of foot ulcer of 12-25%. Foot ulcers reduce mobility and quality of life and are the most important risk factor for lower extremity amputation. High pressures under the foot are a risk factor for foot ulcer and have been linked to reduced ankle range of motion in people with diabetes.

Calf muscle stretching has been shown to improve ankle joint range of motion in both young and older adult populations without diabetes. Calf muscle stretching may be a simple, non-invasive and inexpensive method of increasing ankle joint range of motion resulting in lower pressures under the foot and a reduced risk of foot ulcer in people with diabetes.

Participants will be asked to attend the University of Newcastle Podiatry Clinic at Wyong Hospital for approximately 1 hour to have their foot type assessed, their ankle range of motion measured and their foot pressure measured both barefoot and in-shoe. If testing indicates restricted ankle joint movement, participants will be invited to take part in an 8-week stretching trial to try to improve ankle range of motion and potentially reduce pressure under the foot.

At the end of the trial a foot pressure report can be sent to the participants GP or podiatrist.