Health Sociology I

Description

This course will introduce students to the sociological study and understanding of health and illness, focusing predominantly on Australian society. The course will examine the causes, nature and consequences of major health inequalities, the ways they are culturally understood, and some of the most important attempts to address them. Substantive topics may be drawn from a range of areas including the social distribution of health and illness; health promotion and illness prevention; access to health care; the state and health care system; the division of labour in the health workforce; ideologies of health, illness and inequality; and health, politics and social change.

Availability

Callaghan Campus

  • Semester 2 - 2015

Learning Outcomes

1. An understanding of sociological approaches to the study of health and illness.

2. An understanding of some of the social, economic, political and cultural factors involved in the reproduction or transformation of inequalities in health and health care in Australian society.

3. Skills in critically reading, analysing and evaluating health sociology literature.

4. Skills in researching, constructing and presenting well-supported arguments in written and verbal form.

Content

  1. Sociological approaches to the study and understanding of health and illness.
  2. The social distribution of health and illness in Australian society.
  3. Health promotion and illness prevention.
  4. Access to health care.
  5. The Australian health care system.
  6. Health, politics and social change.

Review of Progress

This course is a compulsory program requirement for students in the following program(s):

In addition to meeting the University's overall requirements for academic progression, students enrolled in these program(s) must satisfactorily complete this course in order to progress in their program.

Assessment Items

Written Assignment: Essays/Written Assignments

Formal Examination: Formal Examination

Participation: Groupt/Tutorial Participation & Contribution

Contact Hours

Lecture

Face to Face On Campus 1 hour(s) per Week for Full Term

Seminar

Face to Face On Campus 2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term