Dermatology and Topical Formulations

Course code PHAR2101Units 10Level 2000Faculty of Health and MedicineSchool of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Presents the pathophysiology of altered health states and their management including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Specific conditions covered in this course include dermatological disorders, including dermatitis, psoriasis, fungal, acne and bites. The course considers aspects of pharmacy practice including a systematic review of prescription and non-prescription medications and complementary and alternate medicines, which will address the quality use of medicines in the treatment of these conditions.

The course builds on student's existing knowledge and understanding of the physical pharmacy principles. It provides students with an understanding of how these principles are applied to the preparation of liquid and semi-solid dosage forms used for topical application of medications including creams, ointments, gels, colloids, transdermal preparations and sunscreen formulations. The stability of these drug products and factors influencing the storage and shelf life of products is included in this course.

Application of the knowledge developed in this course will be complemented by clinical skills training.

Not available in 2014

ObjectivesAt the end of this course students will be able to:
1. Describe the pathophysiology and management of dermatological disorders, including dermatitis, psoriasis, minor skin infections and acne.
2. Describe the quality use of medicines' issues surrounding these therapeutic agents in the treatment of these diseases and continue to develop clinical skills and communication skills in the therapeutic management of these conditions.
3. Develop skills in the use and recommendation of non-prescription medications and advice on non-pharmacological treatment options available in the management of these conditions.
4. Identify the principles of drug stability and discuss pharmacy practice issues relating to storage of topical drug products.
5. Describe the formulation and manufacture of topical dosage forms and sterile drug products including creams, ointments, gels, colloids, transdermal preparations and sunscreen formulations.
6. Understand the skills required in the preparation of topical and dermatological pharmaceutical products and develop competency in extemporaneous dispensing.
Content1. This course will cover the pathophysiology, therapeutic treatment and pharmacy practice issues in the management of:
- Dermatological disorders (including psoriasis; acne; eczema and contact dermatitis; seborrhoeic dermatitis; rosacea; nappy rash; bites and stings; drug induced skin disorders; allergies; Photodermatoses including sunburn; minor bacterial, fungal and viral skin infections; burns and wound care).
2. The concept of minor illness and major disease will be discussed, including the use of prescription and non-prescription products, including Complementary and Alternate Medicines. Non-pharmacological approaches to the management of these conditions will also be discussed.
3. The course covers advanced concepts in formulation development and design of topical preparations including:
- Sterile products, aseptic technique, microbial contamination, spoilage and preservation, principles of sterilisation and storage considerations.
- Dispensing and compounding skills in the preparation of topical dosage forms including creams, ointments, gels, colloids and transdermal preparations.
- Sunscreen formulations.
4. Aging of the skin.
Replacing Course(s)NA
TransitionNA
Industrial Experience0
Assumed KnowledgePHAR1101 Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 1 and PHAR1201 Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 2.
Modes of DeliveryInternal Mode
Teaching MethodsCase Study
Lecture
Integrated Learning
Practical
Self Directed Learning
Tutorial
Assessment Items
Case StudiesCourse Learning Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Examination: ClassCourse Learning Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Examination: FormalCourse Learning Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
PracticalExtemporaneous Dispensing
Course Learning Objectives 4, 5, 6

Compulsory Course Component: Students must demonstrate competency in both theoretical knowledge and practical dispensing skills which form part of the core competencies required of a pharmacist so an overall mark of at least 60% in a combination of the extemporaneous dispensing examinations is required to be deemed competent in compounding and pharmaceutical dispensing. On achieving a passing grade, a final mark will be given in the course and it will be recorded that the student has satisfied the compulsory course component. Students who fail to satisfy this compulsory course component will be offered a supplementary examination. Students who are required to complete a supplementary examination and satisfactorily pass the assessment and pass the course overall will be awarded a maximum mark of 50 for the course. Those who do not pass the supplementary examination will be awarded a zero mark and a FF grade, irrespective of their final numeric mark.
Contact HoursLecture: for 3 hour(s) per Week for 12 weeks
Tutorial: for 1 hour(s) per Week for 12 weeks
Practical: for 2 hour(s) per Week for 10 weeks
Compulsory Components
Requisite by EnrolmentThis course is only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) program.
Compulsory Program ComponentPrior successful completion of PHAR1101 Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 1 and PHAR1201 Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 2.
Compulsory Course ComponentThe assessment components test a student's competency in one or more of the course learning objectives since these form part of the core competencies required of a pharmacist so students must:
1. achieve an overall mark of at least 60% in a combination of the extemporaneous dispensing examinations to be deemed competent in compounding and dispensing.