Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 2

Course code PHAR1201Units 10Level 1000Faculty of Health and MedicineSchool of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy

Provides students with an understanding of the physical pharmacy principles applied to the preparation of liquid and semi-solid dosage forms. This includes the principles applied to solutions, suspensions and emulsions including surface tension, interfacial phenomena, surfactants, adsorption and pH. An introduction to concepts around stability/degradation and storage/preservation will also be explored. The course builds on existing knowledge in pharmaceutics looking at veterinary compounding and manufacture.

An introduction to the basic concepts of pharmacology and how they are applicable to the practice of pharmacy is covered, including receptor pharmacology and an introduction to the autonomic nervous system. Basic pharmacokinetic principles are introduced and the link between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is explored.

This course is a Compulsory Program Component that students must pass in order to progress in the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) program.

Available in 2015

Callaghan CampusSemester 2
Previously offered in 2014
ObjectivesAt the end of this course students will be able to:
1. Describe the physiochemical factors affecting solutions, suspensions and emulsions.
2. Describe the use of medicines in veterinary practice and the principles of veterinary compounding and manufacture.
3. Understand the basic principles of stability and degradation.
4. Understand the basic principles of storage and preservation.
5. Identify the factors influencing the rate and extent of dissolution of a drug.
6. Describe the different types of polyphasic liquid and semi-solid dosage forms used in therapeutics.
7. Discuss the influence of chemical properties of drugs and excipients on the physicochemical properties of liquid dosage forms.
8. Describe the use of pharmaceutical excipients in dosage form design.
9. Describe the application of the basic pharmacological concepts in the management of patients.
10. Describe the basic ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.
11. Discuss how pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics are interrelated.
Content1. Solubility and factors influencing dissolution.
2. Biopharmaceutical importance of particle size.
3. Osmotic properties of drug solutions.
4. Surface and interfacial properties of surfactants.
5. Emulsions, suspensions and other dispersions.
6. Diffusion.
7. Rheology.
8. Excipients including preservatives.
9. Key principles of surface activity, preservation of multiphase systems, adsorption and rheology of pharmaceutical systems.
10. An introduction to the basic concepts of pharmacology and how they apply to pharmacy, including an introduction to receptor pharmacology.
11. The pharmacology of the autonomic nervous system.
12. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) principles of pharmacokinetics.
13. An introduction to pharmacodynamics.
14. Concepts in veterinary medicine, compounding and manufacture.
Replacing Course(s)NA
TransitionNA
Industrial Experience0
Assumed KnowledgePHAR1101 Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 1
Modes of DeliveryInternal Mode
Teaching MethodsLecture
Integrated Learning
Practical
Tutorial
Assessment Items
Examination: FormalCourse Learning Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

Compulsory Course Component: The examination component will test a student's competency in one or more of the course learning objectives since these form part of the core competencies required of a pharmacist. Students must achieve a passing grade in the written formal examination to be able to obtain a passing or higher grade in this course. On achieving a passing grade, a final mark will be given in the course and it will be recorded that the student has satisfied the compulsory course component. Students who fail to satisfy this compulsory course component will be offered a supplementary written examination. Students who are required to complete a supplementary examination and satisfactorily pass the assessment and pass the course overall will be awarded a maximum mark of 50 for the course. Those who do not pass the supplementary examination will be awarded a zero mark and a FF grade, irrespective of their final numeric mark.
PracticalCourse Learning Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
ProjectsCourse Learning Objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Quiz - ClassCourse Learning Objectives 9, 10, 11
Contact HoursLecture: for 2 hour(s) per Week for 12 weeks
Workshop: for 3 hour(s) per Week for 12 weeks
Compulsory Components
Compulsory Program ComponentOHS - Workcover approved First Aid Certificate, National Police Check, Working with Children and Young People Declaration, Current NSW Health Immunisation record and Patient Confidentiality Form.
Requisite by EnrolmentThis course is only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours) program.
Compulsory Course ComponentThe assessment components test a student's competency in one or more of the course learning objectives since these form part of the core competencies required of a pharmacist so students must:
1. achieve a passing grade in the written formal examination.
Compulsory Program ComponentPrior successful completion of PHAR1101 Introduction to Pharmacy and Formulation Sciences 1.
Timetables2015 Course Timetables for PHAR1201