The French Revolution and Napoleon

Course code HIST3670Units 20Level 3000Faculty of Education and ArtsSchool of Humanities and Social Science

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the origins and development of the French Revolution and Napoleon, from the end of the Ancien Regime (1788) to the fall of Napoleon at the battle of Waterloo (1815). This may be offered as a Summer School course.

Not available in 2014

Previously offered in 2011, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2004
ObjectivesUpon completion of this course students will be expected to: display understanding of the origins of the Revolution and its impact on French society between 1788-1815; display an ability to critically analyze primary and secondary documents in the history field; be able to critically discuss and research aspects of the Revolution and Napoleon in France and Europe; be able to bring historical knowledge to bear upon the understanding of present-day issues associated with Revolution, war, conquest, resistance, and collaboration.
ContentThis course will present an overview of the French Revolution and the European wars it engendered between 1788-1815. Major topics to be addressed within this overview include: the Enlightenment; the origins of the Revolution; the impact of the Revolution on French and European societies; the Terror; the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte; the construction of the first French Empire; the reaction of both the European elites and the peoples of Europe to French conquest and the defeat of France by the allied powers.
Replacing Course(s)This course replaces HIST3420 The French Revolution, and HIST3430 Napoleon Bonaparte.
TransitionStudents who have completed HST342, HIST3420 and HST343, HIST3430 will not be eligible for this course.
Industrial Experience0
Assumed Knowledge20 units in History at 1000 level or equivalent.
Modes of DeliveryInternal Mode
Teaching MethodsLecture
Tutorial
Assessment Items
Examination: ClassClass test, as specified in the course outline, 20%.
Essays / Written AssignmentsTwo written assignments, which might include minor or major essays, tutorial papers, book reviews, essay proposals, bibliographies or other similar exercises as specified in the course outline, totaling 5,000 - 7,000 words, 60%.
Group/tutorial participation and contributionClass participation demonstrating preparation and involvement, worth 20%
Contact HoursLecture: for 2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term
Tutorial: for 2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term