Environmental Remediation

Course code ENVS3007Units 10Level 3000Faculty of Science and Information TechnologySchool of Environmental and Life Sciences

Contamination of soil and water may result from a variety of human activities, for example urban, industrial, mining and agriculture. The potential and actual impacts of contamination from these activities on natural ecosystems, and the resultant need for remediation are in many cases well documented. This course will introduce the subject of soil and water pollution from a wide range of sources and examine the mobility of contaminant constituents in soil and water ecosystems. Different remediation technologies and strategies to overcome the resultant environmental problems will be examined in relation to degraded urban, agricultural and industrial landscapes.

In order to participate in this course, students must complete a compulsory Health and Safety requirement. Students will receive full information on this compulsory component in the course outline provided by the school.

This course has a compulsory course component. As well as an overall passing grade (50%), students must meet the established minimum requirements relating to the formal examination and laboratory/practical assessments.

Available in 2014

Callaghan CampusSemester 1
Previously offered in 2013, 2012, 2011
ObjectivesOn successful completion of this course, students will:

1. understand mass balance and pollution calculations;
2. understand many of the basic concepts of pollution, the effects of environmental contamination and the various remediation technologies which may be employed;
3. be aware of contamination and degradation caused by various types of urban, industrial and agricultural development;
4. be able to evaluate the scientific and engineering approaches to landscape degradation and rehabilitation and demonstrate knowledge of various remediation technologies.
ContentSoil and groundwater pollution from different types of development and their behaviour and transport pathways in the environment will be examined. The remediation and treatment of contaminated land forms a major part of this course along with the issues associated with the treatment, reuse and land application of liquid and solid wastes. Pollution control methodologies will be examined and various treatment and remediation technologies covered. Material presented will also deal with the measurement and interpretation of a range of biological, chemical and microbiological pollutants.

Mining in different environments will be examined and issues such as siting of mine infrastructure, disposal and storage of overburden and topsoil, tailings disposal and site rehabilitation will be discussed. Advanced geomorphic techniques will be used to develop mine site rehabilitation plans. The chemical, petroleum and minerals processing industries and the effects that they have on soil and water contamination will be examined as well as methods of rehabilitating and remediating former industrial and mining sites.
Replacing Course(s)EMGT3100 Environmental Remediation
TransitionNot to count for credit with EMGT3100 Environmental Remediation.
Industrial Experience0
Assumed KnowledgeGEOS2050 and GEOS2070
Modes of DeliveryInternal Mode
Teaching MethodsField Study
Lecture
Practical
Assessment Items
Essays / Written Assignments
Examination: Formal- This formal examination has a compulsory course component. A mark of at least 40% in the final formal examination is required to demonstrate that the student has fulfilled course objectives 3 and 4. This is not addressed in other assessment items in the course. On achieving the minimum required mark in the final exam, a final mark will be given in the course and it will be recorded that the student has satisfied the compulsory course component.

Those who fail to satisfy the compulsory course component will have the normal avenues of appeal open to them. In the event of a successful appeal the student will be given a supplementary assessment to determine whether the student has satisfied the compulsory course component.
Laboratory Exercises- Students undertaking this course are required to demonstrate practical and theoretical competency by completing a minimum of 80% of the scheduled laboratory exercises and obtaining an overall grade of at least 50% in the laboratory component of the course.

These are required to demonstrate a student's understanding of Course Objectives 1 and 2 which refer to the application and understanding of concepts and skills. This is not addressed in other assessment items in the course. On passing the laboratory exercises, a final mark will be given in the course and it will be recorded that the student has satisfied the compulsory course component.

Those who fail to satisfy the compulsory course component will have the normal avenues of appeal open to them. In the event of a successful appeal the student will be given a supplementary assessment to determine whether the student has satisfied the compulsory course component.
Reports- Field excursion report
Contact HoursField Study: for 16 hour(s) per Week for 1 weeks
Laboratory: for 2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term
Lecture: for 2 hour(s) per Week for Full Term
Compulsory Components
Compulsory Course ComponentOHS-Safety Induction or Risk Assessment. In order to participate in this course, students must complete a compulsory fieldwork induction.
Timetables2014 Course Timetables for ENVS3007